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Whey looks like pus and smells like vomit

Posted by Random Terrain, in Personal_Stuff 12 August 2011 · 1,548 views

Health
I read this back in the late 1980s, but it seems a lot of people still think that whey is a health food. The following Fit For Life II text is from the link below, but I fixed some errors they had in their blog entry:

www.foreverlivinghealth.com/there-is-a-better-way-than-whey/


Taken from Fit For Life II by Harvey & Marilyn Diamond 1988, p.328



Q: When would be the best time to take brewer's yeast?

A: The best time to consume brewer's yeast is right after the sun turns to ice. We poor Americans are hopelessly gullible. We are constantly having wastes stuck down our throats, and more often than not we are convinced to pay for the privilege! Because of the gargantuan amount of food that is processed in this country, a tremendous amount of waste by-products are generated. These wastes are usually exceedingly difficult to dispose of, but then they are routinely labeled as 'healthy' and sold to people who have been convinced that health can be purchased in neatly packaged tins.

Look at whey, the putrid, yellow-green by product of cheese production. Only about 10% of the milk used to make cheese actually ends up as cheese. The rest of the unlovely liquid separates out as vile-smelling, vile-tasting whey. In the late 1970s there was a frantic search for ways to dispose of it. Before dairy consumption doubled from 1960 to 1978, it was simply trucked to hog farms and fed to pigs, but that became too expensive. Strict federal and state regulations prohibit dumping raw whey down sewers. Whey is 100 to 200 times stronger a pollutant than residential sewage, and most municipal sewage plants cannot treat it adequately. Disposal in streams is out because whey depletes waterways of oxygen, thus rendering them incapable of supporting marine life. Disposal on unused land or gravel pits is often unsuitable because of seepage into water supplies. Many cheese factories simply used to dump the stuff surreptitiously and illegally. An article in the Los Angeles Times (December 4, 1978) announced. "The solution hit upon by both industry and government is to apply high technology and sophisticated marketing techniques and feed the stuff to humans."

Right! Of course! Where else would they get rid of it? There may be strict regulations prohibiting whey from being dumped into the sewers, but there is nothing prohibiting them from dumping it into your food. Don't you just feel like throwing your arms around the food processors in this country and giving them a big kiss? They're in heaven. They get whey better than free—they are paid one cent a gallon to haul it away. The factories producing the whey are more than happy to pay a penny a gallon to have it hauled off so they don't have a waste problem to deal with. Now, start reading some labels and you'll see whey listed in a mind-boggling array of products—soup mixes, cocoa, pancake batter, Twinkies, margarine, packaged mashed potatoes, spaghetti sauces, salad dressings, baby foods, breads, etc., etc. Ovaltine has more whey than any other ingredient except sugar. Whey looks like pus and smells like vomit. It does not belong in your food.

The same goes for molasses, which is the by-product of the refining of sugar, sold for its 'health-giving' qualities. Ha! It used to be trucked off and fed to cows, until it became apparent that people would pay a lot more for it than the cattle farmers.

Brewer's yeast is the by-product of beer production. The beer brewers didn't know what to do with their offal either, so the most dependable solution of all was used—call it a 'health food' and dump it down the throats of the gullible population. Such a nice, easy, profitable, answer to such a nasty, smelly problem.

I was once at a seminar where the subject of brewer's yeast was raised. A girl sitting directly in front of me said, "Ugh, brewer's yeast. I have some every morning, but it stinks up my whole kitchen when I take the top off the can." I tapped her on the shoulder and asked. "If it stinks up your kitchen, what do you suppose it's doing in your intestines?" she got the kind of perplexed look on her face of someone who has just been asked to spell chrysanthemum.

Whether the product is whey or molasses or brewer's yeast or fluoride or radioactive wastes, we must not allow big business to use our bodies to solve their toxic waste problems.



Q: You mentioned Gatorade in a negative way. I thought it was a healthy thirst quencher?

A: Of course you though that. It is exactly what the food processors pay the advertisers to get you to think. The truth is, dishwater is probably a better drink. Gatorade is nothing but water and a bunch of chemicals—water, sucrose (refined sugar), glucose (more refined sugar), salt, sodium citrate (more salt), and yellow dyes number 5 and 6. Sounds like something used to remove paint from a wall. By law these drinks must say on the label how much actual fruit juice they contain. On the label of Gatorade, in print so small you need an extra set of eyes to see it, it states, "Contains no fruit juice." A fruit drink with no fruit. The food processors are taking P.T. Barnum's comment "There is a sucker born every minute" a little too seriously. Look, we can’t keep falling for these things. If we’re not careful, they’re going to start feeding us radioactive waste while telling us how good it is for us. Whoops! I almost forgot. They already are.




Random Terrain
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Nice article, but all dairy is unhealthy according to a lot of people including this doctor:

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" I was once at a seminar where the subject of brewer's yeast was raised. A girl sitting directly in front of me said, "Ugh, brewer's yeast. I have some every morning, but it stinks up my whole kitchen when I take the top off the can." I tapped her on the shoulder and asked. "If it stinks up your kitchen, what do you suppose it's doing in your intestines?" "

Tell me something that doesn't stink up your intestines.
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" I was once at a seminar where the subject of brewer's yeast was raised. A girl sitting directly in front of me said, "Ugh, brewer's yeast. I have some every morning, but it stinks up my whole kitchen when I take the top off the can." I tapped her on the shoulder and asked. "If it stinks up your kitchen, what do you suppose it's doing in your intestines?" "Tell me something that doesn't stink up your intestines.

A perfume gelcap? An incense enema?
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