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What is the Lantronix UDS-10 and what can it do for me? (Modified 9/6/16)

Posted by --- Ω ---, 28 April 2014 · 8,799 views

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** UPDATED**  - 2/03/2016
 
The Lantronix UDS-10 is a hardware device that can give a "Classic Computer" the ability to do things for which it was never designed or intended.  Many of our Classic Computers, have RS-232 ports, even communications programs, but for the most part are unable to get on the Internet.
 
The Lantronix device is a 'smart box', a dual purpose interface.  The first thing it does, is to allow for a conversion from RS-232 pinouts to RJ-45 or an "Ethernet Plug" which is the current standard.  The second thing it accomplishes... it handles all the Internet protocols, independent of the Classic Computer.  To the classic computer, the Lantronix device appears to be only a simple MODEM and even uses the old "Hayes"  command set.
 
Now you may ask, "Why would I want to get my old Classic Computer on the Internet?"  Well, do you remember the old BBS systems?  Yes, a real old-style Bulletin Board System!  These privately run, non commercial systems are easily accessible via Telnet, and Telnet is what the Lantronix does best.  You'll be able to re-live the nostalgia of the BBS days, by connecting to real Classic Computers, run by real people.  You'll meet new friends, learn new things and give that Classic Computer a chance to do something besides play a few games or sit in the corner gathering dust.
 
If you would like to learn a little bit more about the Lantronix UDS-10, there are a couple of links below that might interest you.
 
<< How do I get one, how much does it cost >>
<< Instruction Manual >>
 
If you would like to get a current listing of one of HUNDREDS of currently active BBS available via Telnet, click the link below.
 
<< The BBS Corner >>
<< The Synchronet BBS List >>
 
 
Below is a photo taken with my Lantronix UDS-10 equipped TI-99/4A connected to a real live BBS via Telnet.
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There are no additional long-distance charges, you'll get HOURS of enjoyment, learn lot's of things and meet new people too.  So put that old Classic Computer to work!  :)
 
The attached PDF file will give you step by step instructions on getting online... easily.  While the document is directed at TI-99/4A users, much of the information will be useful for any Classic Computer user.
  
Posted Image
 
 
UPDATE -- 12/16/2014
<< THIS MESSAGE >>  Contains the instructions and first version of Stuart's Internet Browser
This program works on both regular TI's... AND NANO-PEB'S!!   Now is your chance to get in on the ground-floor with this emerging capability.  Maybe you have what it takes to make a 'Killer TI Web page'.
 
UPDATE -- 02/03/2015
Stuart's Internet Browser got some major attention recently in a German IT newsletter.  << HERE >>
After they linked to this page the counter went nuts!  :)  At the time of this posting, there was a lot of discussion on Stuart's little marvel.  Check it out!
 
For more information on Stuart's browser << GO HERE >>
 
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( DOWNLOAD THE PDF BELOW)

Attached Files






Thanks for the tip!  I've been looking for a device like this for a long time, even for projects which have nothing to do with vintage computers.

 

I'm curious: how do you "dial" an IP address for a Telnet BBS if your communication program (such as the one you're using on your 99/4A) only knows how to dial phone numbers?  Perhaps the UDS10 manual explains this; I haven't read it thoroughly yet.

 

EDIT: I see now; you would "dial" the IP address and port number, using a regular AT-style modem command.  Impressive!

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 I was on the "internet" in the early 1990's using Telco and a 2400-baud modem on my TI, through a portal provided by my Delphi subscription. Thank God I had an unlimited account, as it sure was slow, even though it was all text-based back then.

 

But you could reach out to the broader world around you, if you didn't mind scrolling through endless multi-quoted repeats of all prior posts in a reply to reach the newly-added one-liner.

 

I ended up becoming friends with a guy who was working for Cray supercomputers doing international systems installs for that company at the time, who moved out to this area of South Dakota pretty much as a direct result of our conversations. Back then, cutting-edge tech could chat with orphan-tech on an even keel.

 

The conversations revolved around the then-current government seizure of a certain T-rex fossil named "Sue" and all the controversy surrounding that. I just happened to work at the place that discovered the specimen and was using the internet and other venues to seek support for our cause.

 

Pretty cool beans being there at that time in technology when it was opening up to the masses. It was all quite new to everyone and not the entertainment/info/marketing staple that it is today. The speed of your modem and connection was the bottleneck and not the particular system you were using. But even back then, there were many advertisements. ~sigh~ Gotta pay the piper I guess, the same then as now.

 

Other than some message boards where I talked about "Sue," I thought the "WWW" was slothlike slow on the TI, compared to some local BBS I belonged to, and not enticing to me at all.

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What about Commodore PET?  The SuperPET 9000 has a true RS-232 for connecting to IBM mainframe to transfer software code. No browser of any kind though.

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What about Commodore PET?  The SuperPET 9000 has a true RS-232 for connecting to IBM mainframe to transfer software code. No browser of any kind though.

 

If as you say, the Commodore Pet has a true RS-232, it should just a matter of making up a cable that matches the pinouts of the Pet to work with the UDS-10.  Almost all Classic Computers have NO Web browser, my TI is no different.  Many computers from that era had a telecommunications program to call BBS systems with.  If you can obtain a program like that, you should be in business.  BE AWARE, some of those older computers could not go above 2400 baud. 

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If your interested in a UDS-10, here is the best deal I have seen, so far...
 
Lot of 5 Lantronix Universal Device Server Lan to Serial UDS 10 UDS-10 UDS10

Current Price... $29.99 ( USD ) plust $10.00 ( USD ) Shipping..
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If your interested in a UDS-10, here is the best deal I have seen, so far...
 
Lot of 5 Lantronix Universal Device Server Lan to Serial UDS 10 UDS-10 UDS10

Current Price... $29.99 ( USD ) plust $10.00 ( USD ) Shipping..

 

 Not bad, that's $7.99 per unit!  

 

I've been thinking about adding one of << THESE >> to my UDS-10 so my Classic Computer will have WiFi capability.  You'll have to use your Windoze P.C. to enter your routers SSID & password, but after that you can plug it into any device you want, in my case the TI's UDS-10.  Of course you'll have to get a power transformer between of 5 to 12 VDC since the TI has no USB port.

 

<< THIS VIDEO >> shows how simple it'll be to install.

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Do you think "tcpser" would also be a viable option?

 

http://manned.org/tcpser/e8754729

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Do you think "tcpser" would also be a viable option?

 

 

Honestly, I don't know, sorry.  I know many of the Commodore users have gone that route, but I've NEVER heard of anyone doing that with the TI, and that makes me wonder.

 

I personally like the UDS-10 though because I don't need the PC to be on or have another program running just to call out with the TI.  It's a straight shot TI-Lantronix-Router.

 

Now, with Stuart's new Internet Browser written to be compatible with the UDS-10, that's another thing to consider.  Compatibility among the few remaining TI'ers was important to me, as well as the support.

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What is it about the NanoPEB that makes the UDS-10 incompatible with it?  (Other than the Stuart browser.)

 

For the screenshot at the top, what program was used on the TI 99/4a to "dial" the BBS?  Was it Terminal Emulator 2 or something else?

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What is it about the NanoPEB that makes the UDS-10 incompatible with it? 

 

Most legacy software for the TI, like Telco pictured above, addressed the UART directly, so any change in the chip, or the way it handles the data will make the old programs incompatible.  I BELIEVE Stuart is using DSR  access.  

 

Now I'm not a programmer and all this minutiae is above my pay grade, so you might be better served to contact the author for a first hand, and probably more accurate response. ;)

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My friend and I recently tried some experiments with calling BBSs for my podcast. We had some successes and some failures. I don't have a UDS-10. I have a UDS1100 and an MSS100. I have found enough differences to say that one device doesn't always fit all which seems unfortunate. Also: Each vintage hardware can be different. The reason we tried all these experiments is to document how to connect up to telnet-hosted BBSs like Heatwave. It's fun to relive all this.

 

tcpser presents itself as a modem to any vintage system, but the devil is in the details. I have a couple of systems that have so far resisted speaking to tcpser or Lantronix and those issues are probably down to cabling.

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I agree, it is fun, and it should be, it's a hobby! :)

 

True, the UDS-10 for example does not use the same pinouts as a standard modem, so you're right, there is a good chance cabling could be an issue.

 

One of the things I really like about the UDS-10, other than it's price (I've seen them as low as $7.00 each) is the fact that I don't need to boot up a PC or load any programs just to call out with my classic computer.  The little old Lantronix just sits there waiting at a seconds notice to be used.

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Hi,

 

is TELCO v2.3 the very latest version ?

 

schmitzi

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is TELCO v2.3 the very latest version ?

 

 

 I believe it it is.  I personally don't use Telco anymore though.

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ah, OK, thanks.

 

what do you use instead, Omega ?

isn´t it the Telco here in the screenprint on top ?

 

Ralf

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what do you use instead, Omega ?

isn´t it the Telco here in the screenprint on top ?

 

 

When I wrote the booklet on getting your TI online, and when I started this blog I was using Telco, so yes, that is Telco in the photo above.

 

What I'm using now is SOOOO MUCH BETTER (IMHO), but I've been sworn to secrecy.  I'd love to tell you, really I would, especially when I read posts from people having problems with inferior programs.  I so wish I could say, "Don't waste your time with that P.O.S., try THIS instead!",  I can't do that though, as I don't know when it'll be ready, and there is no reason to miss out on the BBS experience now.

 

So, use Telco for now...

 

When the man in charge deems the time is right, he'll release it.  

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BUMP: Look at update section at the bottom of the main article.

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** The Telco image was replaced to add a little COLOR to the page.

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When I wrote the booklet on getting your TI online, and when I started this blog I was using Telco, so yes, that is Telco in the photo above.

 

What I'm using now is SOOOO MUCH BETTER (IMHO), but I've been sworn to secrecy.  I'd love to tell you, really I would, especially when I read posts from people having problems with inferior programs.  I so wish I could say, "Don't waste your time with that P.O.S., try THIS instead!",  I can't do that though, as I don't know when it'll be ready, and there is no reason to miss out on the BBS experience now.

 

So, use Telco for now...

 

When the man in charge deems the time is right, he'll release it.  

 

It's now over a year. Can you talk yet? :)

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Ooops, I guess I let the one get away from me.  Sure, the program is called TIMXT.   The thread on this awesome program is:  << HERE >>

 

If you want to download it, go to << message #18 >>

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