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The ColecoVision II Video game system


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Poll: ColecoVision II Video game system (104 member(s) have cast votes)

Would you be interested in purchasing a brand new 21st Century Colecovision II videogame system for around $200?

  1. Yes if the quality was better then the original 1982 Colecoviison game console. (89 votes [85.58%])

    Percentage of vote: 85.58%

  2. No I am happy with my old oriignal Colecovision or Adam system I am using now. (13 votes [12.50%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.50%

  3. I perfer to use a Computer emulation program to play Colecovision and ADAM games. (2 votes [1.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 1.92%

Vote

#1 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 4:49 AM

As far as I am aware no one is planning on making a 21st Century "ColecoVision II" video game system. These are just some ideals and comments I wrote up to see if there is any interest

Suggestions and ideas: Someone should make a Colecovision II console. Both the Colecovision and Adam computer systems from the early to mid 80's are starting to break and wear out. If some company was able to make a videogame system called "Colecovision II" they might be able to sell over a thousand consoles if it was priced around $200. Also making a "Colecovision II" standalone system would generate more demand for programmers to create new videogames for the Colecovision system. I would like to see a new ADAM computer made also but the demand for a "ADAM computer II" would be a lot less. In reality most people using their Coleco ADAM's today are using them to play exclusive classic Coleco Super Games and Colecovision cartridge games. Hardly anyone is going to use the ADAM for word processing, spreadsheets, and other daily tasks. Windows is so much better than the 1983 ADAM computer.

A new and improved standalone Colecovision videogame system should be called "Colecovision II". It should also have the following features:

1. In order to sell over a thousand Colecovision standalone machines the name would need to be called something like "ColecoVision II". Perhaps several thousand game machines could be sold with a name like that. (There might be copy write issues also too consider with Coleco in the name. )

2. The "ColecoVision II" game system should have more memory then an ADAM Computer. Perhaps 1GB of memory that is expandable. Room for advanced future Supergames.

3. It would be ideal if the "ColecoVision II" would also have a second game cartridge slot to play Atari 2600 games. This would increase sales since both Atari 2600 fans and Colecovision fans would be interested in the game system. Basically instead of having a expansion module front slot to plug in a Expansion module #1 Atari 2600 adapter the unit could have a built in Atari 2600 adapter. Currently only Expansion module #1 and Expansion module #3 the Adam computer plug into the front expansion slot on the old Colecovision. The front expansion slot could be eliminated on the "Colecovision II" console.

4. If there was going to be a front Expansion slot on a new "Colecovision II" game console instead of a built in Atari 2600 adapter like mentioned above, then the front expansion module should allow one to plug in both the Coleco expansion module #1 and #3 modules.

5. The "Colecovision II" should be able to play all Colecovision ADAM Supergames. Adam was the Supergame module for the Colecovision. Perhaps programmers would need to do some conversions of the ADAM games to get them to run in cartridge form on the Colecovision II. The cartridge should also use flash memory to hold the Adam hall of fame. Currently all Coleco Super Games store the names and scores on a disk or Digtial Data Pack.

6. The "Colecovision II" game system should have a HDMI output and one composite video output. Both HDMI and composite video output would be 480i quality with a 4:3 ratio. Ones HDTV processor can upconvert 480i to 1080P. Every new TV now uses HDMI. One could also have component video and S-Video but to save on cost all you really need is one HDMI output and one composite video output with one mono RCA audio output.

7. Maybe the "Colecovision II" should also support 16:9 and 1080P for new advanced games. That 1080P feature might be too expensive and would only be good for new games. Game designers might be able to take advantage of a 16:9 output option. Of course all old games would play in 4:3 at around 480i quality.

8. Maybe the "Colecovision II" should support stereo sound for future games that would use stereo sound. All old games would be in mono.

9. The controllers for the "Colecovision II" system should allow a USB game controller, USB trackball, USB keypad, USB Steering Wheel, and USB keyboard to be connected to the "Colecovision II". Then with an optional $50 adapter sold separately one can connect any old 80's Coleco controller (Roller controller, Expansion module #2: Driving module, Super Action Controller, and standard Coleco hand controller).


My first Colecovision I owned was back in 1982. I enjoyed the near arcade quality graphics and sound. In 1983 I owned the Expansion module #3 that turned the Colecovision into a Super Game module called the Adam computer. Games like Buck Rodgers the Super game, Donkey Kong the Super Game, Donkey Kong Junior the Super Game(5 screens), Subroc the Super Game, and others were much better quality compared to the 32K cartridge versions. Some Coleco Adam games could hold 256K worth of data on the high speed Digital Data Pack. Some games approached the 256K limit while most games were somewhere around 80K-160K in length.

Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Dec 4, 2009 5:33 AM.


#2 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 4:52 AM

I see that there are many threads about making new hardware and games for the Colecovision/Adam computer. Is there a website one can purchase items like Pacman the Collection and Space invaders the Collection? Where does one purchase the items that are talked about for the Colecovision?

Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Dec 4, 2009 4:58 AM.


#3 mimo OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 6:24 AM

After spending the morning de-soldering faulty ram on a coleco pcb that appears to be made of cheese I would seriously consider a new replacement, but $200 would be out of my league

#4 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 6:37 AM

The other important feature I forgot to add to my wish list on a "ColecoVision II" Console

10. A BIOS chip that can be updated with the latest firmware update. Possible a USB floppy disk drive could be attached or game cartridge that would update the BIOS in the "Colecovision II". This would allow for bugs to be fixed and improved updated operating systems to be loaded. The USB controller port or hub on the "ColecoVision II" should allow a USB flash drive to be connected to do firmware updates.




Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Dec 4, 2009 6:46 AM.


#5 mimo OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 6:58 AM

http://www.opcodegames.com/ for buying some of the new games

#6 ten-four OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 7:20 AM

http://www.opcodegames.com/ for buying some of the new games


Hi...

Also CollectorVision has a few new games to choose from. :D

#7 S1500 OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 7:37 AM

Plays Atari 2600 games, but has 1 gig of RAM & HDMI? Bizarre mix of specs. It's like putting a GPS nav unit on a Ford Model T. :)

#8 VectorGamer OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 7:58 AM

I'm confused...

From what I read Eduardo is actively working on the Opgrade Module and then an actual console sometime after...

Did I misunderstand his Opgrade Module thread?

#9 TI99Kitty OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 8:37 AM

As a purely intellectual excerise, I designed a "ColecoVision 2" console (specs and visual design only, I know nothing about creating new hardware). Before I knew much (i.e.: anything) about the Dreamcast, I decided that a CV2 should:

· be a next-gen console, fully capable of competing with whatever Sony, Micro$haft and Nintendo might put out in the next couple of years
· run on a standard OS (even if it's a modified version); most likely Linux, as it's less prone to crashing than Windows
· be fully backwards-compatible with original CV software and hardware (meaning you could use original CV carts and expansion modules, not just emulator ROMs); the console would include a cartridge slot and a front expansion slot for this purpose, and would include adapters to allow the original controllers to be plugged into the controller ports
· have ports for 4 standard CV2 controllers
· come bundled with 2 CV2 controllers
· be about the same size as the original CV, which leaves some room to have a built-in controller "dock"
· have retractable cords on the controllers, much like the Recoil controllers I have for my PC (this, along with the controller "dock" would help reduce clutter)
· include a handheld console, about the size of a Game Boy, that docks with the main console, and provides an extra screen for games that are capable of using it (think instrument panel for simulators, etc.); when separated from the main console, it would function as an independent handheld, for a playing your games when you're away from your console, and would store games and save data on an SDHC or standard SD card
· allow for online play (see the first point) and network connectivity
· include at *least* two USB ports and at *least* one SDHC card slot (probably built into the detachable handheld unit)

I was thinking at least a quad-core processor, 3d accelerator card, and at least 5.1 surround-capable sound card, with an at least 200GB hard drive and at least 1GB of RAM (both of which would be easily upgraded/replaced by the end user). Some games would be downloadable to the handheld unit, for remote play (with fewer features, of course). Video output would be composite/component, with the options for s-video or HDMI (s-video and HDMI cables would, of course, be sold separately). Games could be played from CD or DVD (or Blu-Ray as well, if Sony isn't too greedy over the license fees), as well as CV carts or SD/SDHC cards (having games on SDHC cards might help make up for lack of Blu-Ray support, and would make it easier to play games on the handheld unit). Separate expansion units would allow for playing Atari 2600 carts, TI-99/4a carts, Intellivision carts, or games for any system we could get permission to emulate. The console itself would be capable of functioning as a PC, and therefore capable of emulation, and would have a keyboard/mouse/printer/etc. (all sold separately, of course).

This was all before I knew anything about the Dreamcast. After learning about the DC (when I was planning to buy one), I decided I liked the idea of the handheld unit docking with the controller better than docking with the console, as this allows each player to have their own mini-screen, and their own save game slots. I'd make the handhelds a bit bigger than Sega's VMU, though. And to save space on the controller, to allow for a bigger handheld unit, the rumble feature would be built into the handheld.

(If an agreement with Sega could be reached, the console would also be capable of playing Dreamcast, Saturn, Genesis, etc., games out of the box. The console could then be called the ColecoVision Dreamcast (as opposed to the Sega Dreamcast, see?), or CV Dreamcast for short.)

Fake edit: Better idea -- the controller cords would retract into the *console*, rather than the controllers. Each controller itself would be handheld game unit with a port for the console to plug into. Think of a handheld, about the size of a DC controller, but with a bigger screen. The console would still come bundled with two controllers, and additional controllers would retail for about the same as a current gen handheld from Sony or Nintendo. Games for the handheld would be available on SDHC cards, or for download through the CV2 console.

Real edit: for spelling/punctuation errors.

Edited by TI99Kitty, Fri Dec 4, 2009 8:43 AM.


#10 ten-four OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 8:44 AM

I'm confused...

From what I read Eduardo is actively working on the Opgrade Module and then an actual console sometime after...

Did I misunderstand his Opgrade Module thread?


Hi rmaerz :)

No, I do not think you have misunderstood something from Eduardo's thread. :D

#11 youki ONLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 8:47 AM

I would definitly buy a new colecovision II.

all what i ask , is to be fully compatible with the original. I don't care about improved feature like more ram, better graphics , better sound...

I just want it more reliable , using standard connector for alimentation , audio and video and ideally switchable from PAL to NTSC and the oposite.

The only thing that would improve the colecovision i would like to see, is a CD ROM or DVD reader for the console.
Something like, somewhere in the console you put 32k of RAM that you could load from data on the CD and then use that loaded 32k as it would be simple ROM. That would allow to make very big game. Like great RPG for instance. And would allow to produce new game at low cost. (compared to cartridge format)

#12 S1500 OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 9:08 AM

I think you have 2 radically different designs competing here. One is a modern console that can compete with a Xbox 360 or PS3 with the latest & greatest hardware. The other is a backwards compatible design with 30+ year old hardware(Atari 2600, etc). The two will not mix.

Trying to make a console to compete with the big boys is a massive task that can't be done in a garage with a few friends. It's like trying to make a car to compete with GM, Ford & Chrysler in your backyard. And that's not even including fabrication costs. Others have tried & we all know the fates of them.

A ColecoVision's architecture wouldn't know what to do with HDMI, or surround sound. It's like trying to teach a caveman to fly a predator drone.

#13 5-11under OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 9:31 AM

I think you have 2 radically different designs competing here. One is a modern console that can compete with a Xbox 360 or PS3 with the latest & greatest hardware. The other is a backwards compatible design with 30+ year old hardware(Atari 2600, etc). The two will not mix.

Trying to make a console to compete with the big boys is a massive task that can't be done in a garage with a few friends. It's like trying to make a car to compete with GM, Ford & Chrysler in your backyard. And that's not even including fabrication costs. Others have tried & we all know the fates of them.

A ColecoVision's architecture wouldn't know what to do with HDMI, or surround sound. It's like trying to teach a caveman to fly a predator drone.


Agree pretty much 100%, although I could argue that HDMI would add at least some minimal advantage for future connectivity.
5-11under

Edit: I like my CV to be a CV. I don't need extras like high speed processors, higher resolution graphics, or compatibility with Adam or other products. Some improvements would be nice, however, like increased reliability, and external USB or memory card storage for menu/games (although the Atarimax flash cart does a decent job at this). Extra RAM and ROM can be added inside cartridges fairly effectively (not sure if RAM access speed is an issue), if necessary, without too much added cost.

Edited by 5-11under, Fri Dec 4, 2009 9:41 AM.


#14 Ransom OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 9:55 AM

Agree pretty much 100%, although I could argue that HDMI would add at least some minimal advantage for future connectivity.
5-11under

Edit: I like my CV to be a CV. I don't need extras like high speed processors, higher resolution graphics, or compatibility with Adam or other products. Some improvements would be nice, however, like increased reliability, and external USB or memory card storage for menu/games (although the Atarimax flash cart does a decent job at this). Extra RAM and ROM can be added inside cartridges fairly effectively (not sure if RAM access speed is an issue), if necessary, without too much added cost.


I agree -- a more reliable CV with clean output would be nice. If it could be made to look externally exactly like the original CV (other than the plugs on the back), so much the better -- perhaps reusing old cases to avoid any legal issues.

(Hmm. Maybe we're really talking about a CV motherboard project. If it could be made to use an off-the-shelf power pack and if it fit in the original case, that's all someone would really need to come up with for most hobbyists. There is the power switch height issue, though.)

Edited by Ransom, Fri Dec 4, 2009 9:58 AM.


#15 S1500 OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 11:13 AM

I think a good idea would be to explore cartridge interfaces that could work with a standard PC, whether it's USB or even through a PCI port. I saw the article on hackaday that lets you read SNES modules. Combine that with a decent emulator(emphasis on decent) and you could slap it on a mini-ITX mobo or something. Then add hardware bridging to use older controllers, and wallah: a ColecoVision clone. Could make for a fun kit with the cartridge interfaces alone. Of course add good video outputs that aren't RF.

#16 Pixelboy OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 11:51 AM

Most people who would be interested in a new CV are not willing to pay 200$ for it, that much is certain. Only hardcore CV fans will agree to pay that price. Today, most people can buy a working Game Boy Color or Game Boy Advance for 50 bucks or less, so why would they want to pay 200$ for over-25-year-old technology?

A CV clone needs to be as cheap as possible, and this implies a no-bells-and-whistles design philosophy. We're talking about a motherboard that would be designed to accomodate both old components (original Z80 CPU, original sound chip, original TMS9928 graphic chip, all cannibalized from existing CV consoles) and new components (such as modern RAM chips, and anything else that can be done more cheaply with modern components). I'm guessing the original components could be replaced with modern equivalents (the Z80 in particular, but also the graphic chip which could be replaced with the V9958) but then that would likely complicate the design of the whole machine.

Most CV fans just want a reliable system which is build to last, with a cartridge port, joystick ports, a generic modern power supply (not the hard-to-replace prehistoric black power block that original CVs came with) and some modern TV output options. HDMI seems like a logical choice, but as I understand it, certain royalties need to be paid just for having that option incorporated. Plain A/V, S-video and component output would seem more appropriate at this point in time, even if it's not the ideal solution for the long-term.

Just the points I have outlined above represent quite a challenge for any hardware hobbyist, and that's just for the motherboard, I haven't mentionned the casing or the joysticks, which are significant projects in themselves. On the other hand, if someone managed to get this motherboard done and working, even just a prototype, you can be sure it would receive a LOT of attention from a lot of interested parties, some with deep pockets...

#17 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 4:26 PM

http://www.opcodegames.com/ for buying some of the new games


Hi...

Also CollectorVision has a few new games to choose from. Posted Image


Thanks for the two links. I noticed both websites do not have any prices or a shopping cart to purchase products. Are these games only made in limited runs and sold on EBAY? I did email the two websites to see if they would sell the items directly.

If there was a shopping cart with prices it would generate more sells. The only places I see the games are on EBAY once and a while. The Pacman Collection game sells for over $100 on EBAY. It must be because these are limited runs only? I guess it also costs a lot of money to get permission from the creators of Donkey Kong and Pacman to include it in a new project. These games should be able to sell over a thousand cartridges if they were marketed correctly for around $50 or $60 a cartridge. Making a Colecovision emulation version of Pacman and Donkey Kong for around $30 for PC owners would sell many copies.

Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Dec 4, 2009 4:32 PM.


#18 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 5:04 PM

My first ColecoVision in 1982 cost around $200. My first Expansion module #3 that turned the Colecovision into a Super Game machine with Adam computer cost $600 back in 1983. So the complete Coleco system was $800 total in 1983. On EBAY factory new Colecovisions sell for over $500.

I have no doubt that over 1,000 people would be willing to spend $200 for a "ColecoVision II" machine if it offered improved graphics and sound for new games and 100% backwards compatibility for old 80's games. The key is to have the Colecovision name on the product. The HDMI output would be the ideal feature. Many new TV's are removing analog outputs like S-Video and placing 4 or more HDMI inputs on TV's. Even cheap DVD players for $29 at Walmart have HDMI output. The "Colecovision II" could also have a din plug that would allow optional component video and S-Video cables to be used for older TV's (It would just ship with HDMI and composite video as stadnard).The sound and video would be excellent over HDMI. The picture and sound quality would be just as good as a Coleovision emulator program on the PC.

A low cost bare bones $100 Colecovision clone also could be made

For example Telegames made the Personal Arcade that was a Colecovision clone. That unit played around 99% of all Coleco games but lacked the front expansion input. For $100 suggested retail price some people would be willing to purchase a Colecovision clone that offered only a cartridge slot to play standard 80's Coleco cartridges. This model would just have a HDMI output and one composite output with RCA mono audio output. The name of this unit could be called "Colecovision Clone" or some other name with Coleco in it. It should not be called "Colecovision II" since it is not a real improvement over the 80's version. Without the front expansion module interface I personally would not be interested in the new Colecovision product since I own a ADAM computer and ATARI 2600 adapter that I could not use anymore. Most people would just want to play old Classic games and would not care about having no front expansion input.



Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Dec 4, 2009 5:17 PM.


#19 VectorGamer OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 6:34 PM

I think you have 2 radically different designs competing here. One is a modern console that can compete with a Xbox 360 or PS3 with the latest & greatest hardware. The other is a backwards compatible design with 30+ year old hardware(Atari 2600, etc). The two will not mix.

Trying to make a console to compete with the big boys is a massive task that can't be done in a garage with a few friends. It's like trying to make a car to compete with GM, Ford & Chrysler in your backyard. And that's not even including fabrication costs. Others have tried & we all know the fates of them.

A ColecoVision's architecture wouldn't know what to do with HDMI, or surround sound. It's like trying to teach a caveman to fly a predator drone.


Agree pretty much 100%, although I could argue that HDMI would add at least some minimal advantage for future connectivity.
5-11under

Edit: I like my CV to be a CV. I don't need extras like high speed processors, higher resolution graphics, or compatibility with Adam or other products. Some improvements would be nice, however, like increased reliability, and external USB or memory card storage for menu/games (although the Atarimax flash cart does a decent job at this). Extra RAM and ROM can be added inside cartridges fairly effectively (not sure if RAM access speed is an issue), if necessary, without too much added cost.


Perhaps the biggest gripe with the CV hardware is video out and it's why it usually is one of, if not the first points made about an improved ColecoVision. Power problems are another and it's arguable which is worse.

Costs have to kept in check. It seems like $150 is what gamers are willing to spend for a CV II.

But, maybe this is what the comment "I like my CV to be a CV" means - for me if you try to modernize too much it no longer becomes a "new and improved" retro console and therefore nostalgia is lost. The new hardware must be backward compatible with all legacy expansion modules, controllers and obviously the games.

It would be great in the gaming experience with this console that classic games, Sinistar for example, look and sound arcade perfect. Perhaps this makes it an arcade cabinet in a console.

Question regarding 1080p, HDMI, etc etc...How will Donkey Kong or Space Panic look on my 52-inch HD with this console hooked up using HDMI?

Re: this console competing with the big 3 - I would have to say that if anyone writes games for this console that rival what's available on PS3, Wii and Xbox to please do yourself a favor and write games for those consoles. You are doing yourself a disservice.

#20 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 8:27 PM

I think you have 2 radically different designs competing here. One is a modern console that can compete with a Xbox 360 or PS3 with the latest & greatest hardware. The other is a backwards compatible design with 30+ year old hardware(Atari 2600, etc). The two will not mix.

Trying to make a console to compete with the big boys is a massive task that can't be done in a garage with a few friends. It's like trying to make a car to compete with GM, Ford & Chrysler in your backyard. And that's not even including fabrication costs. Others have tried & we all know the fates of them.

A ColecoVision's architecture wouldn't know what to do with HDMI, or surround sound. It's like trying to teach a caveman to fly a predator drone.


Agree pretty much 100%, although I could argue that HDMI would add at least some minimal advantage for future connectivity.
5-11under

Edit: I like my CV to be a CV. I don't need extras like high speed processors, higher resolution graphics, or compatibility with Adam or other products. Some improvements would be nice, however, like increased reliability, and external USB or memory card storage for menu/games (although the Atarimax flash cart does a decent job at this). Extra RAM and ROM can be added inside cartridges fairly effectively (not sure if RAM access speed is an issue), if necessary, without too much added cost.


Perhaps the biggest gripe with the CV hardware is video out and it's why it usually is one of, if not the first points made about an improved ColecoVision. Power problems are another and it's arguable which is worse.

Costs have to kept in check. It seems like $150 is what gamers are willing to spend for a CV II.

But, maybe this is what the comment "I like my CV to be a CV" means - for me if you try to modernize too much it no longer becomes a "new and improved" retro console and therefore nostalgia is lost. The new hardware must be backward compatible with all legacy expansion modules, controllers and obviously the games.

It would be great in the gaming experience with this console that classic games, Sinistar for example, look and sound arcade perfect. Perhaps this makes it an arcade cabinet in a console.

Question regarding 1080p, HDMI, etc etc...How will Donkey Kong or Space Panic look on my 52-inch HD with this console hooked up using HDMI?

Re: this console competing with the big 3 - I would have to say that if anyone writes games for this console that rival what's available on PS3, Wii and Xbox to please do yourself a favor and write games for those consoles. You are doing yourself a disservice.

A "Colecovision II" over HDMI would output the signal in the original ratio of 4:3 at a resolution of 480I. A persons 16:9 HDTV would display the image at 4:3 with black or gray bars on the left and right of the screen. If a person owned a 1080P display the 480I signal coming from the "Colecovision II" would be upconverted to 1080P with a ratio of 4:3. For people that want to fill the entire 16:9 screen they could stretch the 4:3 image with one of the menu options on the HDTV.

Also a "ColecoVision II" could output native 16:9 ratio for game developers that want to take advantage of the 16:9 ratio. All new TV sets have 16:9 screens. The old 4:3 screen is not an option any more on new TV's. So if one wants to watch 4:3 old TV shows or play 4:3 videogames they need to have black or gray bars on the side to see the original ratio of the content.

For example take a 480I DVD like a old TV show or exercise video that has a ratio of 4:3 and output it on one of the DVD players that has 1080P upconvert video processors over HDMI. If the TV is setup correctly you will have black or gray bars on the left and right, but the general quality would be good. It would not be true HD quality like Blu-ray or PS3 games. Some old films like the Wizard of OZ that were scanned at 8K are then transferred to Blu-ray at 4:3 at 1080P quality.

Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Dec 4, 2009 8:39 PM.


#21 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 9:24 PM

The "Colecovision II" in no way would be better quality then the big 3 video game console makers unless some corporation has several millions of dollars for research and development. Also why would some big corporation want to base a new videogame system on old 8 bit Z80 technology from the early 80's. If you had a 128 bit videgame system that played old 8 bit videogames then there would be a small market for that.

A modern day $299 PS3 that plays Blu-ray games is the best available game system currently. A dual layer BD-ROM disc will hold up to 50GB of data. Maybe if there was a way to modify the PS3 to play Colecovision games off of a BD-ROM or DVD-ROM there would be some interest. A Colecovision emulation for the PS3 would be something very neat to own.

There are desktop PC emulators for the Colecovision and ADAM computer that work ok. They are not perfect and they could still use some improvement.

The main purpose of a "ColecoVision II" would be the following

The original Colecovision sold over 2 million systems between 1982-1985. The problem with the original Colecovison is that it only had a RF channel 3/4 output. In 1983 the standalone Coleco ADAM included a composite video output which greatly improved the video quality. I am aware that people have had their existing Colecovisions upgraded to have better quality video output. The main problem we face today is that a 1982 Colecovision is 27 years old. When the Colecovision's and ADAM's become over 30 years old more and more systems will start to break and it will just be harder and harder to repair the systems as the years go on.

1.The main purpose of a "ColecoVision II" videogame system would be to make a modern day 21st Centrury videogame system that plays all the existing Colecovision cartridges and allows the use of all the expansion modules. Basically 100% backwards compatibility of the original Colecovision.

2. As a bonus the "ColecoVision II" videogame system would include a HDMI output for modern TV's and a legacy composite output for old TV's. Since the original 80's Coleco game controllers are falling apart the "ColecoVision II" would use a low cost USB game controller, USB trackballs, USB steering wheel, USB keypad, and USB keyboard. The system should also accept original Coleco controllers for those that still have working ones. One of the reasons I use a PC Coleco emulator a lot is the keyboard functions a lot better then my original Coleco controllers. Also the video and audio quality is better on a PC. A "ColecoVision II" BIOS firmware updates would also be possible with a USB flash memory to make operating system improvemnets.

3. The "Colecovision II" should also have more memory then the Adam Computer Super Game module #3. With improved graphics and sound technology game developers could make advanved videogames. This would be a selling point. People could purchase a Atarimax Colecovision 128 in 1 Multicart to play old public domain games while waiting for game developers to make new and improved games. Some people like me are getting very excited about the new Space Invaders, Pacman, and Donkey Kong screen shots that have been posted. Some of the new games are going to need even more power then Coleco's Supergame system called the ADAM computer.

4. If a $200 "ColecoVision II" was designed very well and released in about 3 years from now it is possible that over a 1,000 people would purchase it. It would take about 3 years to design a system that was better then the original Colecovision. Maybe if a business contract with a major retail store like Walmart, Sears, or a toy store was possible perhaps 5,000 to 10,000 "Colecovision II"'s could be sold over a few year period. If it had a colorful box like the original Colecovision and was boxed with one neat game that would be great. There are people that grew up in the 80's that would purchase a modern "ColecoVision II" system.

Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Dec 4, 2009 9:58 PM.


#22 Inky OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 10:02 PM

The only extra I would want is ADAM compatibility and standard 512K ram.

#23 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 4, 2009 10:13 PM

The only extra I would want is ADAM compatibility and standard 512K ram.

The first ADAM add on memory modules were the original Coleco 64K memory. Then later 256K and 512K were created by third party companies. The ADAM computer did have 1MB and 2MB memory modules that were created by Micro Innovations back in the late 80's for the ADAM. The ADAM computer also had a 1.44MB 3.5 inch floppy drive and hard drive in the late 80's and early 90's that were created by Micro Innovations. Personally I would like to see a new and improved "ADAM Computer II" made but I do not think there is enough demand. Most people still using their ADAM's today mainly use them for Coleco Adam Supergames and standard Colecovision cartridges.

It would be possible to convert all the ADAM games and Supergames over to a cartridge. A 256K cartridge would be all that is needed to hold the biggest game every made for the ADAM. The cartridge would also need to be a flash memory cart in order to store the hall of fame names and scores.

Of course if you really needed a ADAM computer for business applications like word processing and spreadsheets you could always plug Expansion module #3 the ADAM computer directly into the front port of a "Colecovision II" system. Then you would have a ADAM computer with HDMI video and audio output.

Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Dec 4, 2009 10:30 PM.


#24 S1500 OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Dec 5, 2009 12:20 AM

Okay, now I'm getting reminded of this Onion article.

http://www.theonion....oyee_decides_to

#25 WatchVenusSpa OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Dec 5, 2009 4:47 AM

I for one would buy one just to have a system compatable with the classic games. The new stuff would be cool but just so long as they give me a similar feel as the classic CV and the games are fun ala the Wii.




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