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#26 TwiliteZoner OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Aug 21, 2010 9:16 AM

OK... I finally was able to get a complete upload. The last BYTE magazine (Electronic Office) should be workign and complete now. Sorry for the problems..


Not a problem. Your work is very much appreciated.

#27 Standard User OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Aug 21, 2010 7:36 PM

It shows as 388 MB's here, but I think it is complete. Haven' t checked every page, yet. ;) For reference, the back cover appears to be a Radio-Shack ad.

We appreciate the effort and patience that goes into preserving these. :)

#28 SeaGtGruff OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Aug 21, 2010 10:26 PM

It shows as 388 MB's here, but I think it is complete.

I think he was just giving an approximate number. It shows up in a directory listing as 397,523 KB-- drop the last three digits, call it megs instead of kilos, "397 megs."

But as we all know, a computer kilo is 1024, not 1000, so it isn't actually 397 MB.

This is what I get when I look at the properties: 388 MB (407,063,291 bytes)

We appreciate the effort and patience that goes into preserving these. :)

I second that! :)

Michael

#29 high voltage OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Aug 22, 2010 3:40 AM

Love it too
I don't mind a sideways page, good issue anyway.
A mouse could be had for $332.00 and HDDs for $4000? wow.

#30 Bill Loguidice OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Aug 22, 2010 8:49 AM

Love it too
I don't mind a sideways page, good issue anyway.
A mouse could be had for $332.00 and HDDs for $4000? wow.


Which is about $700 and $8500 respectively in today's dollars if you're referring to 1983 prices. The hard drive is understandable given the technology of the time and how amazing it would have been to have one, but certainly having a $700 mouse would be tough to justify, especially then...

#31 high voltage OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Aug 22, 2010 2:47 PM

yeah, that was the 83 issue.

Could you put up another 70s issue? They sure make exiting reading

#32 Jimmer OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Aug 22, 2010 4:16 PM

I don't remember which issue I was flipping through but I ran across an Ohio Scientific ad. That was my first computer with its 8-inch floppies. Oh, those clicks as the floppies were accessed!!!

Reading through these issues is formally a "blast from the past!"

Bravo and thank you, Thump!

- Jim -

#33 ThumpNugget OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Aug 22, 2010 4:30 PM

The next one was going to be the December 1980 issue on "adventure gaming" but I can swap it with the February 1978 issue "Hardware Projects" (unofficial title). I should have it up tonight sometime.

One tidbit of great news: I have been able to obtain an issue #1... Anyway I am going to be out of town for a couple of weeks starting September 3rd and will be sans internet most of the time. My goal is to get six magazines up before I go including the two I mentioned above, plus issues #1, #2, and #9... so lots of good 70's reading coming up. The one remaining issue to put before I go I have not decided on yet..probably the September 1983 portable computing issue.. The #1 and #2 issues will be posted just before I leave.

#34 ThumpNugget OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Aug 22, 2010 5:32 PM

BYTE Vol 03-02 1978-02 Hardware Projects - 596 Pages, 397 Megs

This issue of BYTE has a plethora of electronics projects.. Articles include an Address State Analyzer, a $3 Light pen, a minifloppy interface, a digital interface, and using stepper motors.

Beyond hardware project there are also articles on simulating motion, a disassembler for the KIM computer, a Tutorial on Boolean Algebra, a second part on brain controlled robotics, and programming entomology.

Probably the most interesting articles deal with networking. The first article is entitled "CIE NET: A Design for a Network of Community Information Exchanges Part I", and another article called "Personal Computers in a Communications Network"

More interesting stuff in the Nucleus section as well...

Download it here: BYTE Vol 03-02 1978-02 Hardware Projects

Cover

BYTE Vol 03-02 1978-02 Cover.jpg

Index

BYTE Vol 03-02 1978-02 Index.jpg

Bonus!

BYTE Vol 03-02 1978-02 Bonus.jpg

#35 JamesD ONLINE  

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Posted Mon Aug 23, 2010 8:07 PM

Announcing the most advanced disk anywhere for $6,000
The 74 megabyte disk from Ohio Scientific

I carry more on a cord around my neck for $10 now. :D
Ya gotta love it!

#36 Standard User OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Aug 23, 2010 8:53 PM

Off-topic, idle question, but at what density/scale were most chips etched at back then. (80's), say, compared to a modern 32nm process of today. If we were to create a 6502 on a new process, what scale factor are we talking about - 100x, 1000x ? ;)

Edited by AtariNerd, Mon Aug 23, 2010 8:54 PM.


#37 potatohead OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Aug 24, 2010 9:43 AM

I think I remember part of that adventure gaming issue. Looking forward to that. Old school text / graphic adventures are a lot of fun.

One of the Prop heads got Zork playing on the thing. Reads games from SD card, and outputs to TV, Serial, VGA. Seeing that has got me in the mood for that nostalga trip big!

Re: 70's issues. Yes!! I was floored by the quality of articles. I printed out the Bill Gates article on the future of software development, and have seen several people stop to read it on the office window. Seeing stuff like that gives a great perspective on just how far things have come in some ways, and not so far in others.

#38 high voltage OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Aug 24, 2010 11:27 AM

Awesome another 70s issue many thanks
I was just asked to do some magazine scanning myself, but it seems a difficult task to keep the pages straight in the scanner, especially if you have a Canon Pixma MP630, were nothing heavy like the other magazine half can be sticking out (as it falls to the ground).
Tips?

#39 ThumpNugget OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Aug 24, 2010 3:32 PM

Oh! Scanning with a flatbed scanner would be painful... I focus on throughput when doing scanning - a feeder scanner is much faster and much straighter for magazine pages. Getting pages straight should not be too difficult though.. When you OCR them after processing let the software straighten the pages for you. The scanning software can do this too but I have not had a lot of luck going that route and the OCR works better if you process the pages first... Scan,process to remove bleed, OCR with correction (straighten the pages), fix the pages with OCR problems (about 1 out of 50), OCR the problem pages with "exact" image placement, bookmark, done. :)

#40 ThumpNugget OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 25, 2010 12:40 PM

BYTE Vol 05-12 1980-12 Adventure - 404 Pages, 276,303,872 Bytes

The BYTE Adventure Issue! Two adventures with source code including one by Scott Adams, Survey of adventure games, Article on Zork and Character variation in RPG Games... reviews of Dungeon Campaign, Stellar Trek, Morlocs Tower, ODYSSEY: The Compleat Adventure, Microsoft Adventure, and others.

There are some excellent non-adventure articles as well: Part 2 on the Micrograph video processor, Computerized testing, Multi-machine computer games, A review of the HP-41C Pocket Computer, etc.

Download it here: BYTE Vol 05-12 1980-12 Adventure

Cover

BYTE Vol 05-12 1980-12 Cover.jpg

Index

BYTE Vol 05-12 1980-12 Inex.jpg

Bonus!

BYTE Vol 05-12 1980-12 Bonus 1.jpg BYTE Vol 05-12 1980-12 Bonus 2.jpg

#41 akator OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 25, 2010 12:52 PM

Once again, pure awesomeness. Thanks, ThumpNugget :D

#42 batari OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Aug 26, 2010 12:23 AM

Off-topic, idle question, but at what density/scale were most chips etched at back then. (80's), say, compared to a modern 32nm process of today. If we were to create a 6502 on a new process, what scale factor are we talking about - 100x, 1000x ? ;)

In the 70s-80s, transistor size was measured in Ám. I believe the 6502 was 16Ám and the 8086 was 3Ám. I guess that would be 100x-500x bigger?

#43 potatohead OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Aug 26, 2010 9:02 AM

I just checked in to see the adventure game issue. Thanks!!

I really am enjoying the tutorial articles. The way things were explained in BYTE is excellent, and often simple and accessible. What a great resource.

#44 Hans OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Aug 26, 2010 1:13 PM

Dear ThumpNugget:

You rule.

I've been searching for electronic versions of this magazine for ever! It was a great magazine - I still recall the issue where the IBM PS/2 was introduced.

Any chance of digitizing all of the 1980s issues & putting them up as a torrent?

#45 ThumpNugget OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 27, 2010 7:54 AM

BYTE Vol 00-09 1976-05 Shooting Stars - 100 Pages, 57,425,920 Bytes

Byte Issue #9! An up-close look at the KIM computer, Build a serial ASCII Word Generator, Build an Octal Front Panel, Serialize bits from your keyboard, a detailed look at PROMs, a look at the INTERSIL IM6100 chip, and so much more!

The letters section has some great letters including one on the blasphemy of wanting to remove front panel lights...

Download it here: BYTE Vol 00-09 1976-05 Shooting Stars

Cover

BYTE Vol 00-09 1976-05 Cover.jpg

Index

BYTE Vol 00-09 1976-05 Index.jpg

#46 Hatta OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 27, 2010 8:12 AM

These are coming a lot more frequently than weekly. :) You must be keeping pretty busy with this. I love it.

#47 ThumpNugget OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 27, 2010 10:21 AM

Dear ThumpNugget:

You rule.

I've been searching for electronic versions of this magazine for ever! It was a great magazine - I still recall the issue where the IBM PS/2 was introduced.

Any chance of digitizing all of the 1980s issues & putting them up as a torrent?


Hey there Hans, thanks much for the comment.. At this point I have no idea how many I will do or how far up datewise I will scan. If the opportunity comes up to get the later issues I will probably get them and take a look to see if they are worth scanning. I have a pile of creative computing and Kilobaud mags that I would like to get done as well so it just depends on what shows up to buy and what gets completed in my collection.

As far as torrents that will probably happen as volumes become complete (and if not someone else will make torrents since the mags are now "out there") So far I am only at about 30 Gigs a week (about 10% of what is available) for transfers. I have also had some offers to take some of the bandwidth so there is no need as of yet to remove any of the older magazines. Issues #1 and #2 will get posted next week (actually they are already up I just have not put a link to them yet :) ) - that may draw some attention at some point and change things who knows.

#48 high voltage OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 27, 2010 2:55 PM

BYTE Vol 00-09 1976-05 Shooting Stars another great issue. Many thanks.
Wow, the first home computer space strategy game/shoot em up (for a Scelby Computer).
Posted Image
(cropped pic for illustration purposes)
I know, Basic programming books were loads available way back, but a book with just one game title, in machine language, with extras, to purchase as a video game intended.
I want that book

Edited by high voltage, Fri Aug 27, 2010 2:57 PM.


#49 Bill Loguidice OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 27, 2010 4:52 PM

BYTE Vol 00-09 1976-05 Shooting Stars another great issue. Many thanks.
Wow, the first home computer space strategy game/shoot em up (for a Scelby Computer).
Posted Image
(cropped pic for illustration purposes)
I know, Basic programming books were loads available way back, but a book with just one game title, in machine language, with extras, to purchase as a video game intended.
I want that book


It actually wasn't for a "Scelbi", I think that's just the publisher or branding for the book series. Also, it appears to just be a variation on the popular "Trek" games that had a commercial and non-commercial run from the early 70's to pretty much the mid 80's. Adam Trionfo posted the PDF of "Scelbi's Galaxy Game for the "6800"" by Robert Findley, which as near as he can tell was published in 1977. The one in the BYTE issue from 1976 appears to be "Scelbi's Galaxy Game for the "8008/8080"", which appears to have been published in 1976. So there were at least two books in this series.

Here is the link to Adam's PDF (he got the book through inter-library loan):

http://tinyurl.com/24eckhy or http://www.orphanedg...(Robert Findley)(1977).pdf

and his full explanation:

"
I have added the book "Scelbi's Galaxy Game for the '6800'" by Robert Findley [Scelbi Computer Consulting, Inc.]. Since this book isn't well known at ALL, I have decided to include more information about it than I normally would. Listed below are the description from the back of the book, the book's introduction, and the table of contents for the book. This should give you a better idea of what to expect from this book.

Description from the Back of the Book:

Captain your own crusading starship against the logic of your "6800". Your mission: search-and-destroy a random number of alien ships. But, don't run out of time, out of fuel, out of ammunition or out of the galaxy. Your galaxy consists of 64 quadrants, subdivided into 64 sectors. Plan your mission to destroy all aliens. But, every time you move you lose a stardate and precious fuel. Don't run into a roaming star that could damage your ship! And, don't forget how much fuel your warp factor uses!

Suddenly, "Condition RED! Alien in sight!" How big is he? Fire a phasor or torpedo? He's damaged or destroyed. But, you've used up valuable fuel! Does he fire back? How much fuel was used for protective shields? Be careful. You're running out of time and fuel. You get the idea. You must maneuver logically, strategically, carefully... to complete your mission.

Here's the multidimensional computer game you've asked for. Using the original manufacturer's recommended mnemonics and assembly format, with hexadecimal notations, you've got a total book form program in machine language, for 4K memory, with flow charts, illustrations and more.

Introduction

Imagine yourself as captain of a space ship traveling throughout the galaxy. Your mission is to seek and destroy all alien ships to make the galaxy safe so that other ships from your planet may journey into outer space. Due to the urgency of the mission it must be completed within a given time. If the mission is not completed with-in the time allotted, the safety of all future voyages is in jeopardy. Your space ship is supplied with a limited amount of fuel and weapons so you must choose your course and attack strategy carefully. Mission control has placed space stations at various points in the galaxy for refueling. A space station contains a limitless amount of fuel and weapons. However, don't get caught too far from a space station with your energy low or you may end up drifting endlessly through space.

As an aid in searching the galaxy, the space ship is equipped with a galaxy scanner which is capable of displaying three different degrees of detail. The short range scan provides an accurate picture of the immediate quadrant through which the space ship is currently traveling. Your location and that of any alien ships, stars, and space stations in the quadrant are defined by exact sector coordinates. The long range scan displays the contents of the eight quadrants surrounding the quadrant you presently reside in. The wide angle scanner provides a view of the total galaxy from which you can plot your course.

The space ship is equipped with two types of weapons. The PHASOR is an energy discharge device which homes in on all enemy ships in the immediate area and directs specified amounts of energy at each. This energy, if enough to destroy, will completely eliminate the alien ship. However, should the alien ship survive the attack, it will retaliate by shooting back at your ship. It is important that you keep the energy in your ship's protective shields at sufficient levels to withstand any possible retaliation from the enemy. The other weapon available is the TORPEDO. It is capable of destroying any alien ship on impact. The target must be in direct line of sight of the space ship for the torpedo to reach its destination. A missed torpedo shot results in immediate retaliation by the alien ship. Also, be careful when there is a space station in the area. If the torpedo hits it, the space station is destroyed.

Now, turn your imagination into the realm of reality by transforming your small computer system into the control station of the space ship. Each move by the space ship is controlled by the computer operator and the responsibility of the total mission is placed on the operator's shoulders. The GALAXY program presented here will allow one to make this transformation by loading the program as presented, and simply adding the appropriate I/O routines for one's specific I/O setup. Or, it can be expanded by revising the command operations or adding new commands to make the game more complex, and modifying it to take advantage of special I/O devices which the reader may have associated with one's computer system. The number of possible variations are limitless. The operation of this program is explained in detail to aid those that desire to make revisions and additions to its operation.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1 - Operation of the Galaxy Program

Chapter 2 - System Requirements

Chapter 3 - Data Table, Messages and Subroutines

Chapter 4 - Major Routines of the Galaxy Program

Chapter 5 - '6800' Assembled Listing

Chapter 6 - Sample of Galaxy Operation

You can download "Scelbi's Galaxy Game for the '6800'" here:

http://tinyurl.com/24eckhy

(or use the full URL:)

http://www.orphanedg...(Robert Findley)(1977).pdf

Now, at last, I can say... Enjoy!

Adam
"

Edited by Bill_Loguidice, Fri Aug 27, 2010 4:53 PM.


#50 Bruce Tomlin OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Aug 28, 2010 8:07 AM

From the "64x64" thing, it sounds like a variant on the typical "star trek" game of the era. Looking at the linked scan, this seems to be quite right. And I think it might be useful to OCR that thing.




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