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Atari Indus GT disk drive - equivalent to a 'Happy' drive? Better?

indusGT indus gt atari floppy disk drive happy drive

55 replies to this topic

#51 dafivehole OFFLINE  

dafivehole

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Posted Sun Feb 22, 2015 12:17 PM

Just ordered a Happy 1050 kit from AtariMax... free shipping  :-D  Can't wait to compare to my Indus...

 

Roger



#52 Larry OFFLINE  

Larry

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Posted Sun Feb 22, 2015 12:41 PM

Let us know what you think after you've used it awhile!

 

It will also be neat to see what the Mega-Speedy does for the 1050.  They will likely be showing up in the next several weeks.

 

-Larry



#53 Faicuai OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Mar 4, 2015 8:56 AM

...Always wondered about the recurrence (and treatment) of this question, for which the most immediate (and simple) would stem from operating a stock INDUS drive and a stock 1050 in a modern host (A800/800XL + Incognito or Ultimate, with latest version of SDX).

 

Out of the box, and with proper SW, the Indus is clearly a better-built, better-looking, more efficient and more reliable drive than the 1050 (period). It will do ~55-60 Kbps on SDX with NO HW UPGRADES, whatsoever. I happen to own both Indus and 1050 drives. The Indus takes up clearly less space (hor+ver), draws less power, it runs much cooler, makes a lot less noise, it is FASTER than the 1050, supports multiple-density schemes (up to 180K SS), has on-board display and front-access controls, and it is VERY easy to upgrade, with dedicated internal expansion slot. Plus, on top of all this, it actually runs a Z80 (not that I am a real fan of it, but think about the gazillion of code written for it).

 

post-29379-0-55149000-1371917379.jpg

 

 

Snap in the 64KB-board into the Indus expansion slot (which I already installed in one of my units), and watch your Indus push its performance envelope to its limits, plus (magically) transforming itself into a CP/M HOST COMPUTER! Now, your Atari becomes a "terminal" connected via SIO, and you can boot and run Z80/CPM code via Indus own computing resources.

 

Not sure what the point is comparing a souped-up 1050 (none of its max-performance kits are "minor" upgrades, at all) except for saying that the 1050 HW platform enjoyed a wider collective-support from hacking activists (which is true, of course). Pour in that collective experience back into the Indus, and it will effortlessly match (and surpass) the 1050, at half the power & heat, 30% less volume, much more reliably, and bad-ass looking, too!

 

My 0.02c


Edited by Faicuai, Wed Mar 4, 2015 9:03 AM.


#54 bbking67 OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Mar 4, 2015 10:05 AM

...Always wondered about the recurrence (and treatment) of this question, for which the most immediate (and simple) would stem from operating a stock INDUS drive and a stock 1050 in a modern host (A800/800XL + Incognito or Ultimate, with latest version of SDX).

 

Out of the box, and with proper SW, the Indus is clearly a better-built, better-looking, more efficient and more reliable drive than the 1050 (period). It will do ~55-60 Kbps on SDX with NO HW UPGRADES, whatsoever. I happen to own both Indus and 1050 drives. The Indus takes up clearly less space (hor+ver), draws less power, it runs much cooler, makes a lot less noise, it is FASTER than the 1050, supports multiple-density schemes (up to 180K SS), has on-board display and front-access controls, and it is VERY easy to upgrade, with dedicated internal expansion slot. Plus, on top of all this, it actually runs a Z80 (not that I am a real fan of it, but think about the gazillion of code written for it).

 

attachicon.gifpost-29379-0-55149000-1371917379.jpg

 

 

Snap in the 64KB-board into the Indus expansion slot (which I already installed in one of my units), and watch your Indus push its performance envelope to its limits, plus (magically) transforming itself into a CP/M HOST COMPUTER! Now, your Atari becomes a "terminal" connected via SIO, and you can boot and run Z80/CPM code via Indus own computing resources.

 

Not sure what the point is comparing a souped-up 1050 (none of its max-performance kits are "minor" upgrades, at all) except for saying that the 1050 HW platform enjoyed a wider collective-support from hacking activists (which is true, of course). Pour in that collective experience back into the Indus, and it will effortlessly match (and surpass) the 1050, at half the power & heat, 30% less volume, much more reliably, and bad-ass looking, too!

 

My 0.02c

 

Well said Faicuai.  Until SDX came out (which I bought immediately), the biggest issue I had with the GT (I owned two) was simply that no DOS outside of DOS XL supported Syncro-Mesh.  I loved the GT for all of the reasons mentioned (save for the CPM upgrade that didn't seem to be available commercially).  I did burn through several power supplies over my time with Indus drives (luckily they were easy to replace using the Atari 5200 equivalence).

 

While the Indus was my first FDD for the Atari, I later got a smokin' deal on some brand new 1050's (close-out from a retailer I worked for).  Once I upgraded the 1050's (one with a US Doubler and one with a USD clone) I ended up using these as primary drives and preferred them just from a pure practicality perspective: I could use the high speed in more situations.  I never thought for a second that the 1050 was better, but it was somewhat more practical for that given time period.  Once I started using SDX things improved

 

When I started using the 1050, I had acquired a 130XE... and to me the 1050 styling paired up with the 130XE was awkward looking at best, whereas the Indus GT looked great alongside any Atari.  I always preferred the 800XL over the 130XE, but the 130XE was far better when using the ICD carts (R-Time 8 and SDX) where they went out the back or on the Multi I/O port extender).



#55 mechanerd OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Nov 8, 2017 7:01 PM

I wish I had never sold my Indust GT.. Too bad they never made a DS DD version.  Guess what i got from a friend, A collection of 2000 MIDI files from the Action Annex BBS that I helped run back in 1982-1986. The BBS went offline about 1990. 206-892-8969 (disconnected) The BBS ran an atari 800 with an ATR 8000 with a collection of 5.25" and sometimes 8 " floppy drives in DSDD format. The CP/m was neat to run.   However, about 1994, the 8 bit disks were archived to Atari ST 3.5" disks. about 75 of them . Only 25 read correctly. So I want to get an ATR 8000 working again.. The two hulks from the storage unit both failed within an hour of operation and even replacing the power supply with a pc one for +5v and +12 led to the boards just sucking power and heating up the ram chips.
I am in search of an sio cabled, dsdd drive that can read these disks. 
The sio2pc cable is one route. but I found some old DOS IBM PC software that might read the disks correctly. 
I will gather up an old Pentium with an ISA FD controller,  I have 5 5.25" drives that I know work and read those disks. 
Funny that the ATR 8000 also had a parallel and serial port with drivers for the Atari to add a p; and r: device. 
Basically for the cost of a handful of 74ls chips one could make an Indus into an ATR.. 
I am tempted to get a xf551 dsdd drive and run it to destruction to get the data.
But for a real drive, the 1050 with the Happy mod sounds like the way to go.



#56 sup8pdct OFFLINE  

sup8pdct

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Posted Thu Nov 9, 2017 1:27 PM

You can use an XF to read atr8000 disks however some work will be required to get the sectors in the same order as written.

There are 3 different DSDD disk layouts. Percom, ATR8000 and xf551. XF does side one from track 1 to 40 then side 2 from track 40 to 1.I cannot remember what the percom and atr do.

I know one does second side from track 1 to 40, and the other does track 1 both sides then track 2 both sides etc

.If you can borrow a Blackbox with floppy board,it can be set to read dsdd floppies in ATR8000 format as well as xf and percom.

 

James







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