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Double Hi-Res Graphics


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#26 thej OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 22, 2015 2:52 PM

"Inside the Apple 2e" by Gary B. Little is a MUST HAVE book!

it's covers all the hardware and important aspects of DOS3.3 and other stuff to.
This includes Clear and Concise descriptions of ALL of the soft switches for ALL text and Graphics modes !!!
There are many convoluted descriptions of how to use the softswitches online. NOT worth your trouble !!!

You can find a copy here:

http://apple2online....13_Apple-II-IIe

TheJ



#27 whiteplanet OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Sep 23, 2015 5:12 PM

Little information on Double-HiRes Graphics. Great

book on everything else on the Apple ][e from

a technical perspective.

I have seen the chapter index and outline

to this book:-

 

Hi-Res Graphics & Animation Using Assembly

Language by Leonard Malkin

 

It is detailed explanation/examples of graphics

for the Apple ][ and also includes Double-HIRes

Graphics.



#28 JamesD ONLINE  

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Posted Thu Oct 8, 2015 4:58 PM

Compute issues 89 and 90 (1987) have commands for Double Hi-res graphics.



#29 MarkO OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Oct 8, 2015 5:34 PM

<< SNIP >>
 
Hi-Res Graphics & Animation Using Assembly
Language by Leonard Malkin

 << SNIP >>


I have been looking for this Book, since you posted this.. This one is like, "Unobtainium", for anything in a reasonable price range..

MarkO

#30 MarkO OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Oct 8, 2015 5:41 PM

Compute issues 89 and 90 (1987) have commands for Double Hi-res graphics.


At the Internet Archive:

Compute Issue 89

Compute Issue 90
 
 
MarkO

#31 whiteplanet OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:24 PM

I have been looking for this Book, since you posted this.. This one is like, "Unobtainium", for anything in a reasonable price range..

MarkO

 

Unfortunately there are members in the community who have this book. They were willing to scan

and send it to me. But when it came to actually doing it, it all stopped. It seems to be the

case of 'who has the largest collection of books' for the Apple. And that's it. What is

point of having the books on the shelf just sitting there? And not using them.

Especially if someone can. So yes, I agree. It is that cateory of 'unobtainium'. Will look into

the links you have posted.

 

Thanks


Edited by whiteplanet, Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:25 PM.


#32 Caterpiggle OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Oct 12, 2015 11:40 PM

Hello to you all,

 

What I need is the BESTEST demo graphics capabilities on all Apple II family computers ! I need to download the BEST graphics demo ever up to 2015 year ! Not the Artist programs, only DEMO.



#33 Caterpiggle OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:25 PM

No-one answer my question above ? ANYONE ?



#34 Osgeld ONLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:51 PM

http://www.pouet.net...Apple II&page=1



#35 Caterpiggle OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 13, 2015 8:43 PM

Wow .. that is pretty limited Graphics Demo on that web site above ...

 

Not such as on Atari 8 bits in thousands of Graphics Demo ....

 

Thank you for drop off that link above ! :-D



#36 TMR OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Nov 14, 2015 7:04 AM

Wow .. that is pretty limited Graphics Demo on that web site above ...


Pouet isn't a complete archive of the any section of the demo scene, but DemoZoo pretty much mirrors it and i didn't find any large archives elsewhere when looking a while back...
 

Not such as on Atari 8 bits in thousands of Graphics Demo ....


The Apple II was one of the demo scene's origin points, but the European coders took to it far more readily and most of the evolution from crack screen to stand-alone demo took place there where the Apple II wasn't the most commonplace system.

As to why there's not much now... i don't know why there aren't more dedicated Apple II coders out there, but as a UK-based 6502 bunny with prototype code who has only ever seen half a dozen Apple IIs in the wild and can't afford real hardware for testing, that's my excuse and i'm sticking to it! =-)

#37 JamesD ONLINE  

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Posted Sat Nov 14, 2015 12:14 PM

Machines that were primarily popular in the US didn't get many demos.
Basically, the Apple II and CoCo.
I guess American coders were interested in programming something else.



#38 ZylonBane OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Nov 14, 2015 1:15 PM

I'm sure the Apple II's stone-age audio/visual capabilities have nothing to do with it.



#39 Osgeld ONLINE  

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Posted Sat Nov 14, 2015 3:08 PM

IMO that makes it more fun 

 

I have been threatening to do a demo for the apple II for years, and even have some routines scattered about on disks, but something usually takes priority 


Edited by Osgeld, Sat Nov 14, 2015 3:09 PM.


#40 TMR OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Nov 14, 2015 6:52 PM

Machines that were primarily popular in the US didn't get many demos.
Basically, the Apple II and CoCo.
I guess American coders were interested in programming something else.


The PAL people had something of a feedback loop with each demo released giving other coders new ideas and leading to new inventions, but this code was PAL and crapped out on NTSC so the American sceners never properly saw what was going on to learn from it. The C64 was popular in both regions but the NTSC demo scene there has always been... well, for want of a better word, more primitive compared to what the PAL guys were doing at around the same time. It didn't stop them producing demos though...
 

I'm sure the Apple II's stone-age audio/visual capabilities have nothing to do with it.


Like Osgeld says, in demo coding circles that's usually just a challenge - there's a lot of demos for the 48K Spectrum for example and that's only about twice the CPU grunt and a guaranteed means to latch onto the vertical blank away from what the Apple II has on the hardware front (usually with AY support but it's an add-on for the 48K machines like the Mockingboard is).
 

I have been threatening to do a demo for the apple II for years, and even have some routines scattered about on disks, but something usually takes priority


i've got a oneparter pretty much ready to go (well, i have to update the greets) which runs on 48K with a Mockingboard so i might have to push it out at some point soon... but i'm not placing any money on it working across the board though, it relies on a technique that only some of the documentation reckons will work from frame sync! =-)

#41 ZylonBane OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Nov 14, 2015 11:18 PM

Like Osgeld says, in demo coding circles that's usually just a challenge

 

Almost. The challenge of most scene demos on 80s/90s computers is finding novel ways to exercise the hardware. That's not really possible with the Apple II. You have a slow CPU, a speaker that clicks, and video hardware that does exactly what it was designed to do and no more. It's... boring.

 

Now the Apple //gs offers much more possibilities for demo coders.



#42 TMR OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Nov 15, 2015 3:30 AM

Almost. The challenge of most scene demos on 80s/90s computers is finding novel ways to exercise the hardware. That's not really possible with the Apple II. You have a slow CPU, a speaker that clicks, and video hardware that does exactly what it was designed to do and no more. It's... boring.


Again, that's not much different to the 48K Spectrum but there's still a reasonably solid demo scene there. And not all demo coding is about (ab)using the video hardware either, routines like DYCPs, DXYCPs, plotters, bobs, line and filled vectors would all be fair game with the challenges being 1) getting them going with the Apple II's video layout and then 2) finding the most optimal method to push the object count and/or refresh speed up.

Now the Apple //gs offers much more possibilities for demo coders.


Yes and no, for some demo coders the IIGS would be interesting but just as many like restrictions; there's twice as many demos for the Apple II as there are the IIGS and, as far as i know at least, all of the interested coders coming from outside the Apple II community right now are leaning towards the older machines.

#43 Osgeld ONLINE  

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Posted Sun Nov 15, 2015 9:58 AM

I find the iigs boring its got a slow cpu and a me too every other 16 bit computer vibe

#44 JamesD ONLINE  

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Posted Sun Nov 15, 2015 12:18 PM

I find the iigs boring its got a slow cpu and a me too every other 16 bit computer vibe

Because clearly, a 6502 with tacked on features that mostly just catch it up with the competition, tied to 4 bit per pixel graphics are too "16 bit" and a 3MHz CPU, faster than most 8 bits is too slow.   :ponder: 
 



#45 Osgeld ONLINE  

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Posted Sun Nov 15, 2015 1:35 PM

yea but compared to every other 16 bit machine its painful, and what you get is me too 4096 colors and me too software, its only saving grace is the backwards compatible part, otherwise a stock GS is mostly a brick even in its own software lineup (which is why the first thing you do to a GS, if someone didnt already is toss a pile of ram in it and a CPU accelerator card) 

 

its a 1984 design released to compete against 1987 computers in a era when apple was trying to reassure hard core apple II people they were not left behind in the wake of the mac II lineup


Edited by Osgeld, Sun Nov 15, 2015 1:41 PM.


#46 JamesD ONLINE  

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Posted Sun Nov 15, 2015 6:20 PM

yea but compared to every other 16 bit machine its painful, and what you get is me too 4096 colors and me too software, its only saving grace is the backwards compatible part, otherwise a stock GS is mostly a brick even in its own software lineup (which is why the first thing you do to a GS, if someone didnt already is toss a pile of ram in it and a CPU accelerator card) 

 

its a 1984 design released to compete against 1987 computers in a era when apple was trying to reassure hard core apple II people they were not left behind in the wake of the mac II lineup

The 65816 is more capable than a 6502 but comparing a 3MHz 65816 with it's 3 special purpose registers to an 8MHz 68000 with 16 registers, flat memory model and 8/16/32 bit support is asking a lot.  If you stick an 8+ MHz accellerator into the IIgs it is reasonably competitive though and a lot of the games that are slow were written for a IIgs with an accelerator board, they really weren't intended to run on a stock machine.  Plus, the GS GUI isn't very optimized from what I can tell.
 



#47 Osgeld ONLINE  

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Posted Sun Nov 15, 2015 6:26 PM

only reason I compare a 816 and a 68k is cause that was the market it competed in, looping back around to the topic I think the 8 bit apple II is more interesting becuase of its severe limitations in graphics and sound, a GS is just going to show me amiga and atari st routines we have all seen a thousand times, just slower :)



#48 potatohead OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 27, 2015 10:29 PM

Well, there was a thread on comp.sys.apple2 regarding the GS outputting the signals needed for composite display.  I don't have a GS, or I would have wired that up just to see whether it's still active in some of the GS graphics modes.  Could be demo material there, somewhere.

 

BTW, the recent releases by French Touch seem to be doing fun stuff with the Apple 2 video.  Cycle exact mode changes do the sorts of things we are used to seeing on other 8 bit computers.



#49 Tanrunomad OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Dec 1, 2015 11:58 AM

There is a program called Double Vision which added double hi-res capability to Applesoft.  The disk image includes the actual source code to examples.  I used this to create the DHR BASIC game Double Deadly Orbs a few years back.  Here's the link: https://dl.dropboxus...doublevision.do



#50 MarkO OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Dec 1, 2015 3:31 PM

Well, there was a thread on comp.sys.apple2 regarding the GS outputting the signals needed for composite display.  I don't have a GS, or I would have wired that up just to see whether it's still active in some of the GS graphics modes.  Could be demo material there, somewhere.

 

BTW, the recent releases by French Touch seem to be doing fun stuff with the Apple 2 video.  Cycle exact mode changes do the sorts of things we are used to seeing on other 8 bit computers.

 

( NOT SO ) Cheap Tunes was very cool too..  I have an Original MockingBoard, so it was "very authentic"...

 

I would like to Port, Swinth to Double Hi-Res and MockingBoard...

 

Swinth Music

 

Swinth Graphics

 

MarkO





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