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How come there aren't any 5.25 external USB floppy drives?


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#26 JamesD ONLINE  

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Posted Mon Feb 5, 2018 6:16 PM

 

That is freaking cool!  I have no need for one, but for those who do the prices is even reasonable.  GOOD POST!  :thumbsup:

There used to be more of them out there.
What they will do if you hook up a 5.35" drive is anyone's guess. 



#27 OLD CS1 OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Feb 5, 2018 7:42 PM

So...yeah...anyone know of a current 720k DD disk read solution for modern computers?

 

YMMV.

 

eBay Auction -- Item Number: 232205508565

eBay Auction -- Item Number: 191981106489



#28 JamesD ONLINE  

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Posted Mon Feb 5, 2018 8:41 PM

I had a USB floppy that looked like the 2nd one.  I never tried reading non-pc formats.  



#29 -^Cro§Bow^- OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Feb 5, 2018 11:24 PM

That first one clearly states on the box that is supports 720k/1.44mb disk types so it likely will do the business but the price seems a bit out there. Especially the $15 to ship.

 

The second one looks like the one I have now and it while the article I read from last November stated this drive could do 720kb disks, it simply does not. Strangely this drive I just got does show up as a TEAC drive though. 



#30 OLD CS1 OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Feb 6, 2018 12:04 PM

I just confirmed my Dell USB floppy drive, the model with both the USB port and the slide-in docking port for the old Inspiron and Latitude D-series, both formats and uses 720k floppies.

 

Dell model FDDM-101, mechanism is NEC FD3238T.

 

To format under Windows 7, use

 

format x: /n:9 /t:80

 

Where x: is the floppy drive letter.



#31 Keatah OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Apr 19, 2018 9:00 PM

The question is how much you would be willing to pay for a pretty, all-in-one solution. $80? $100? $150? $200? As long as nobody is manufacturing a such device, I see that you've got a few less elegant, but working solutions to choose from:

  • The FC5025 mentioned twice. It has a fair price, but is read only and only does 5.25" drives. However it nowadays support non-MFM formats which is great.
  • The SuperCard Pro mentioned once. It costs twice as much as the FC5025 but can write disks as well and handles different sized drives.
  • The Kryoflux not previously mentioned here, but which seems to have dropped in price once the SuperCard hit the market. Perhaps it is the one with the biggest community support, if you need that.

Catweasel seems like a thing from the past, but then again 5.25" floppy disks also are a thing of the past.

 

Can SuperCard Pro work with native file systems? Specifically MS-DOS 5.0 and MS-DOS 6.22?

 

Smithsonian uses FC5025

 

Kryoflux is full of shit.

 

Catweasel, yes, is outdated.

 

---

 

IMHO, the best solution is a computer with USB and 5.25/3.5 drive support.

 

I got to thinking of this "problem" and found my Tualatin rig fits the bill. It has onboard 5.25 and 3.5 interfaces. It has multiple USB ports.

 

In fact I might re-case it just so I can add a 5.25 without giving up the dual optical drives! A nice little summer project!



#32 carlsson OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Apr 20, 2018 10:14 AM

Can SuperCard Pro work with native file systems? Specifically MS-DOS 5.0 and MS-DOS 6.22?


I don't own the unit so I can't give you the first person assertive answer you probably are looking for, but the manufacturer has a specific PC disk format section of their forum which I would suggest is there for discussing how to archive and restore PC disk formats, which by the way tends to be the most common ones that any internal drive likely is able to handle if your computer has internal drives.

 

http://www.cbmstuff....play.php?fid=11



#33 jjh76 ONLINE  

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Posted Fri Apr 20, 2018 10:43 AM

For 5.25" disks, you could try getting one of these and using a serial to usb adapter:

 

https://www.ebay.com...aYAAOSwIjxa18bC



#34 Keatah OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Apr 20, 2018 12:44 PM

For 5.25" disks, you could try getting one of these and using a serial to usb adapter:

 

https://www.ebay.com...aYAAOSwIjxa18bC

 

I don't think that would work, the 4869 external drive's interface is not a standard RS-232 serial interface at all. They have "special" interface cards or built-in ports for those. The drives were built at a time when IBM was getting pissed at itself for losing control over the PC architecture.

 

Anything fucking PS/2 is proprietary and under license. A failed attempt at regaining control.

 


Edited by Keatah, Fri Apr 20, 2018 12:56 PM.


#35 Keatah OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:05 PM

I don't own the unit so I can't give you the first person assertive answer you probably are looking for, but the manufacturer has a specific PC disk format section of their forum which I would suggest is there for discussing how to archive and restore PC disk formats, which by the way tends to be the most common ones that any internal drive likely is able to handle if your computer has internal drives.

 

http://www.cbmstuff....play.php?fid=11

 

I will have to read through it and see what's all there. I get the sneaky suspicion that it's all about archiving and special container formats for that purpose. And while I'm archiving, too, I'm not doing it with the anal-ness of SPS or any shit like that. I took inventory and found that..

 

My old 486 DX2/50 (undergoing cleaning and "restoration") has:

5.25/1.2M

3.5/1.44M

Parallel port Zip drive

3 IDE HDD

Runs MS-DOS 5.0, 6.22, and Win 3.1

 

My old Tualatin rig has:

3.5/1.44M

Parallel-port and USB Zip drive

3 IDE HDD

Firewire and USB ports

Supports modern flash media

Supports 5.25/1.2M drive (I have to buy one)

Runs WinXP currently.

 

..with that hardware there I see several options to mix and match and transfer floppies to modern flash media. Could even simply load one of the hard drives and then use an IDE-USB adapter for $5.00.

 

It's nice to have the options and capability there. And I was hoping to add a 5.25 - USB interface, much like those 3.5 - USB drives that were popular in the dot-com era.


Edited by Keatah, Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:07 PM.


#36 Keatah OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:18 PM

A note on "preservation" I really have no desire, actually negative zero desire to image and preserve floppy disk images with the level of detail SPS does.

 

I'm only interested in lifting the data off them and storing it in modern media - which can be migrated over time and used on all PCs. All without dealing with specialized drivers or formats or even hardware.



#37 OLD CS1 OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Apr 20, 2018 3:27 PM

Actually not that bad.  The disk drive interface is well-documented and 37-pin connectors are surprisingly not difficult to find.  I have rigged up an adapter to use one of these enclosures with the TI -- though just the hardware and have not have time to test, yet.  Maybe in a few weeks; it is on my "list."

 

But in any case you are not using that with USB without some kind of additional interface.



#38 Keatah OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Apr 21, 2018 2:13 AM

I'm not sure I'm interested in designing or setting up a custom interface. Looking for a simpler route that other non-technical people can apply, too.

 

Is it your intent to interface one of those IBM drives to a TI-99/4A? Did I read that right?


Edited by Keatah, Sat Apr 21, 2018 2:25 AM.


#39 Keatah OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Apr 21, 2018 2:50 AM

My realistic practical/doable options seem to involve the use of old hardware.

 

1- I can connect the 5.25 temporarily to the Tualatin rig (PIII), and dump to a USB JumpDrive or WD removable.. The Award BIOS was coded in a transitory time when the 5.25 and 3.5 drives were becoming legacy, but still around.

 

2- I can leave the 5.25 in the 486 and use the Parallel Port ZipDrive from the 486, and then use my USB ZipDrive to transfer directly into any modern rig. This would work in 100MB chunks.

 

3- I just got a NIC card. I might be able to use that. But I feel tedium could be an issue here - because my fat-ass is too lazy to set up the drivers (right now) in Win 3.1, if it's supported there. It's a 3Com Fast EtherLink ISA 10/100 Base-TX 3C515-TX.

 

4- I could use the serial port with a terminal, but, that sounds like it requires too much tedious fiddling with the software. File-by-file is out of the question. And zipping/compressing, again, too many steps.

 

---

 

I also got to thinking about imaging the old 486's hard disks also. They're 212MB and 504MB and 1.6GB each. I know the first two only support CHS. I was hoping my little USB-IDE cable would work, but it only understands LBA, and 48 at that. So, back to the PIII rig I think. It supports CHS and has BIOS options to set the capacity and parameters. I checked that it interpreted the numbers on the HDD label. And the capacity matched the BIOS calculations. I have yet to try it for real though, however..

 

I could also use imaging programs of the day, but, I'd rather use a certain version of Acronis TrueImage that I know is reliable. Additionally, I could just copy the DoubleSpace/DriveSpace container files.






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