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#1551 jericho_21 OFFLINE  

jericho_21

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Posted Tue Nov 6, 2018 7:09 PM

Right. That is true. But, I was thinking about only Atari systems, not other developers. But, you're right. It would be CPU-intensive for sure. I agree. It is hard enough for me to get 3D acceleration, for a certain example, on my Linux and Windows guests on VirtualBox for my iMac, and I have a Intel quad-core i7 and 16 GB of RAM in it. The 3D acceleration slows down the machines down too much if it is checked, but that is experimental on VirtualBox anyway, and I am working with a late 2009 iMac, so it is slower than newer Macs. So, I understand what you mean about emulation and it not being perfect. But, good point anyway. Real hardware trumps emulation all the time. So, yes, I do get that, but thanks for bringing it up anyway.

 

Anyway, that was just an example. I am no emulation expert, but I am certain it could be harder to emulate older cores for classic video gaming. But, I could be 180º off on that, too. Thanks. :)



#1552 42bs OFFLINE  

42bs

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Posted Wed Nov 7, 2018 12:38 AM

Anyway, why you want to play a NES (for example) game on the jaguar when you have a NES emulator on the PC? IMHO it's better to use your time to create a new and original game than an emulator.

 

Writing an original game for the Jaguar isn't an easy job. Esp. for a one-man-team. First the (unique) game-idea, then the game play and graphic and sound are often killers. I remember some reactions when I released T-Tris for the Lynx. Many comments on the "stolen" sound effects or the poor gfx. None about being the first Lynx game with safe-game feature :.(

 

Writing an emulator is challenging and can be done alone (or mostly alone).

 

(Edit: Typos, more info)


Edited by 42bs, Wed Nov 7, 2018 12:47 AM.


#1553 jericho_21 OFFLINE  

jericho_21

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Posted Wed Nov 7, 2018 12:45 AM

 

Writing an original game for the Jaguar isn't an easy job. Esp. for a one-man-team. First the (unique) game-idea, then the game play and graphic and sound are often killers. I remember some reactions when I release T-Tris for the Lynx. Many comments on the "stolen" sound effects or poor gfx.

Writing an emulator is challenging and can be done alone (or mostly alone).

This is true, too. Atari used teams of programmers to make video games for the Jaguar. At least, that is what I heard through the grapevine, and it is probably so. I can see how it is tough, especially with assembly code. 



#1554 42bs OFFLINE  

42bs

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Posted Wed Nov 7, 2018 12:49 AM

This is true, too. Atari used teams of programmers to make video games for the Jaguar. At least, that is what I heard through the grapevine, and it is probably so. I can see how it is tough, especially with assembly code. 

 

Assembly if not tough. That's an urban legend. It is a bit more time consuming though.



#1555 jericho_21 OFFLINE  

jericho_21

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Posted Wed Nov 7, 2018 12:55 AM

Perhaps. I think that is what I meant anyway. Tell me, does one need to have an understanding of BASIC for assembly code and have a great understanding of math? That is the learning curve for me: understanding a totally different counting system. We are raised to know decimal math, but hex gets me. I can wing it, but that's it.

 

I had heard from someone that one would need to understand BASIC well to get into assembly. I am sure it isn't that hard otherwise, but I am coming from this as a total novice, that's all.



#1556 42bs OFFLINE  

42bs

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Posted Wed Nov 7, 2018 1:13 AM

Well, hex and binary arithmetic are a must for any programming on an embedded system. I'd even say for *any* kind of programming.

 

Assembly is not difficult. And knowing BASIC is neither a must nor is it hindering.

 

The difficulty is the machine. Writing code for a multi cpu system is a challenge.

 

So, if you want to start programming in Assembly, do it on an easier system (like the Lynx ;-) )



#1557 CyranoJ ONLINE  

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Posted Wed Nov 7, 2018 2:38 AM

Or hit up RaptorBasic+

#1558 jericho_21 OFFLINE  

jericho_21

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Posted Wed Nov 7, 2018 10:49 AM

Or hit up RaptorBasic+

That is true as well. Assembly would be of use on the Lynx, for sure. I have been wanting to learn Raptor BASIC+ anyway. OK. Thanks for the info. :)



#1559 slx OFFLINE  

slx

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Posted Fri Nov 9, 2018 7:13 AM

 
Assembly if not tough. That's an urban legend. It is a bit more time consuming though.

Assembly language itself is probably simpler than most other stuff as it is limited to very elementary instructions but knowing what to read and write where is the challenge, I imagine even more so in the Jag‘s case with multiple processors to use.


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#1560 LinkoVitch OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 9, 2018 8:33 AM

Yes and no.  Assembly is simpler (RISC even more so), it also removes some of the abstraction introduced by higher level languages (like variables).  So if you were to start programming with assembler you would probably find it makes perfect sense, if you come from a high level language, you might be a little confused by the absence of concepts like variables, and datatypes.

Talking to hardware is going to require you know "where" to write things in any language, possibly again abstracted for you by some of the languages that will present you a nice API and do a lot of the lifting for you behind closed doors.

There are various simulators that will simulate a CPU and allow you to write assembly and step through it's execution, watching registers and processor flags being set etc, they are AWESOME learning and prototyping tools.  I have used Easy68K myself loads when trying to figure out why a bit of code isn't doing what I thought on the jag, as it gives me much better visibility of what the 68K is doing than what I can see of the Jag's

The extra CPUs in the jag can mostly be ignored until you need them, and if you have gotten your head around one CPU, picking up others isn't that difficult.  I think the biggest hurdle for people with assembly is that they assume it's difficult or some kind of wizard language.. it's not.. It's just a very logical, very simplistic programming language.  It may take more instructions to do the same thing, but it does the same things in smaller steps.



#1561 42bs OFFLINE  

42bs

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Posted Fri Nov 9, 2018 8:37 AM

LinkoVitch: Perfect description. I double the tip with the simulators. I always try to get one when I learn a new Assembly/CPU.



#1562 MAYAman OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 9, 2018 11:23 AM

When I hit the lottery I will commission the creation of a Panzer General type game for the Jaguar.  It will be the greatest WWII simulator ever made.  That is all!



#1563 Hastor OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 9, 2018 11:25 AM

As someone that's only worked in higher level languages, I understand how assembly can be more straightforward. However I also feel like it's along the lines of teaching someone to use a pair of scissors. I can teach sometime who has never seen them to use them in 2 minutes. Gonna be a while before I let them cut my hair though.




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