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Why is the TI99/4a so popular here?


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#26 Casey OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 7:30 AM

I'd say one thing that continues to draw interest in the TI is the level of development in hardware, software, and emulation. New games and languages are still being created, new expansion options, and the emulation is really quite good. That we are able to use a TI-99/8 in emulation is itself quite a feat, and with rumored emulation of other non-produced TI models (99/2, 99/5) the future is still quite exciting for those of us who have been fans of the TI. The community that has been built here is second to none.

#27 --- Ω --- OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 8:13 AM

Our little TI community here at Atari Age is populated with POSITIVE people, which keeps others coming back.

Our TI community also has something for everyone, and people can find a niche to fill and feel part of the community.

 

As mentioned we have hardware guys, software guys, documentation guys, librarian & history guys, music guys, video guys, gamer guys and new people coming in.  Everyone is included no matter what their level of hardware or technical expertise.  It's a fun place to be with new stuff happening all the time.  With the new hardware, the "entry expense for admission" compared to other systems has gone way down while the quality of the games has gone way up.  Who in their right mind would NOT want to join us?

 

http://ti99.atariage.com



#28 Zuse OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 8:17 AM

This was my thought, too -- it's a noisy few. Their enthusiasm is pretty awesome though, and they seem more realistic about their fetish than the Jaguaristas.

 

Nothing good was ever accomplished without at least a small share of crazy. Or maybe "passion" is the right word...



#29 OLD CS1 OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 8:31 AM

Our little TI community here at Atari Age is populated with POSITIVE people

 

 

HUMBUG!!



#30 JamesD OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 9:29 AM

HUMBUG!!

Actually, Star-K Systems only made that for Motorola processors.
  :D



#31 save2600 OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 9:48 AM



#32 BassGuitari OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 12:33 PM

 

We need to represent more.  I feel like the Apple II isn't getting all the love it deserves here.

It's interesting that the Apple isn't better remembered, even by younger (late 20s-30s I mean) people. If were in elementary school at any time between 1980 and, like, 1996, chances are you worked with an Apple. Shit, when I was in fourth grade and the class was herded to the library for a half-hour or whatever a couple times a week to learn typing, it was Apple IIcs that we used. That was in 1994-95. And a lot of people still had them at home at the time, too--the neighbor kid across the street had a IIc that we'd play games on (I remember Sabotage) and my aunt and uncle had a IIc that I'd play Space Quarks on during the occasions we'd visit.

Even as late as 6th grade ('96-97) I remember playing Oregon Trail in the math teacher's classroom (we were allowed if we finished our work early or something). And even when I was a junior (maybe even a senior?) in high school (we're talking 2002-03 by now), I took an earth science class where the teachers rolled out an Apple IIe--with Disk II, Monitor II and all--for some activity we were doing one day that utilized this software that only the old Apple had.

The Apple plaftorm had such longevity--even in its afterlife--and spanned so many eras and reached so many people that it just doesn't make sense to me there isn't more interest or activity around it. The thing started out with cassette tapes and game paddles and bored kids were still jamming on its games into the infancy of the PlayStation, or learning about soil composition more than a decade past its obsolescence.

 

I'd say one thing that continues to draw interest in the TI is the level of development in hardware, software, and emulation. New games and languages are still being created, new expansion options, and the emulation is really quite good. That we are able to use a TI-99/8 in emulation is itself quite a feat, and with rumored emulation of other non-produced TI models (99/2, 99/5) the future is still quite exciting for those of us who have been fans of the TI. The community that has been built here is second to none.

I think maybe what I should have asked instead of "Why is the TI99/4a so popular at AtariAge" is, "Why aren't other computers more popular around here?" Although, the AtariAge activity of these respective scenes seems to reflect their interest outside of AA as well (except for Commodore, which already had its own thriving and dedicated forums for the VIC-20 and C64). For instance, there are only about five or six people who regularly post in the Tandy forums, which seems to jive with the unfortunate lack of interest in TRS-80 systems I see in general. Though, I'll grant that non-PC clone Tandy systems didn't really survive past the '80s as far as popular visibility goes, at least certainly not to the extent the Apple II did. And even in the back half of the '80s they got drowned out by PC clones, Apple IIs, Commodores, and 16-bit systems. But the Apple scene being so quiet is a mystery to me.



#33 Grimakis OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 1:17 PM

It's interesting that the Apple isn't better remembered, even by younger (late 20s-30s I mean) people. If were in elementary school at any time between 1980 and, like, 1996, chances are you worked with an Apple. Shit, when I was in fourth grade and the class was herded to the library for a half-hour or whatever a couple times a week to learn typing, it was Apple IIcs that we used. That was in 1994-95. And a lot of people still had them at home at the time, too--the neighbor kid across the street had a IIc that we'd play games on (I remember Sabotage) and my aunt and uncle had a IIc that I'd play Space Quarks on during the occasions we'd visit.

Even as late as 6th grade ('96-97) I remember playing Oregon Trail in the math teacher's classroom (we were allowed if we finished our work early or something). And even when I was a junior (maybe even a senior?) in high school (we're talking 2002-03 by now), I took an earth science class where the teachers rolled out an Apple IIe--with Disk II, Monitor II and all--for some activity we were doing one day that utilized this software that only the old Apple had.

The Apple plaftorm had such longevity--even in its afterlife--and spanned so many eras and reached so many people that it just doesn't make sense to me there isn't more interest or activity around it. The thing started out with cassette tapes and game paddles and bored kids were still jamming on its games into the infancy of the PlayStation, or learning about soil composition more than a decade past its obsolescence.

 

I think maybe what I should have asked instead of "Why is the TI99/4a so popular at AtariAge" is, "Why aren't other computers more popular around here?" Although, the AtariAge activity of these respective scenes seems to reflect their interest outside of AA as well (except for Commodore, which already had its own thriving and dedicated forums for the VIC-20 and C64). For instance, there are only about five or six people who regularly post in the Tandy forums, which seems to jive with the unfortunate lack of interest in TRS-80 systems I see in general. Though, I'll grant that non-PC clone Tandy systems didn't really survive past the '80s as far as popular visibility goes, at least certainly not to the extent the Apple II did. And even in the back half of the '80s they got drowned out by PC clones, Apple IIs, Commodores, and 16-bit systems. But the Apple scene being so quiet is a mystery to me.

 

There is plenty of interest around Apple II. I think internet resources are so plentiful that the need for a forum isn't as great. There are software repository websites. Technical manuals for every piece of hardware ever released. Tons of add-on peripherals, both old and new, with eBay being an easy way to get anything.

 

Unlike some other computers, the Apple II is so well documented that a lot of the general FAQ type questions don't even come up. When I have some trouble and have exhuasted my resources, I'll post on AppleFritter or VCFed. Bound to find an answer there.



#34 VectorGamer OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 1:18 PM

SlowRide.png



#35 BassGuitari OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 1:36 PM

There is plenty of interest around Apple II. I think internet resources are so plentiful that the need for a forum isn't as great. There are software repository websites. Technical manuals for every piece of hardware ever released. Tons of add-on peripherals, both old and new, with eBay being an easy way to get anything.
 
Unlike some other computers, the Apple II is so well documented that a lot of the general FAQ type questions don't even come up. When I have some trouble and have exhuasted my resources, I'll post on AppleFritter or VCFed. Bound to find an answer there.

Good points!
 

attachicon.gifSlowRide.png

you-dont-say-meme-rage-face-nicolas-cage


Edited by BassGuitari, Fri Mar 3, 2017 1:49 PM.


#36 JamesD OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 9:52 PM

Some die hard apple people still use the comp.sys.apple2 usenet groups, and there are a bunch of forums that support the Apple II.
Given the length of time they have been around and the fact that they are somewhat friendly, people haven't gone looking for a new place to visit.



#37 Tempest OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 10:02 PM

Which forums are those? I might want to poke around them a bit.

#38 JamesD OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Mar 3, 2017 10:37 PM

Which forums are those? I might want to poke around them a bit.

I usually only visit a couple myself.  These are the ones I remember off the top of my head.
The last one has a "Vault" with some unique files for download.

http://www.applefrit...com/?q=forum/84
https://68kmla.org/f...8-apple-i-lisa/
http://www.whatisthe....org.za/forums/
http://macgui.com/forums/
 



#39 am1933 OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Mar 4, 2017 11:41 AM

Further to the initial question, I have undertaken a serious amount of research into this matter. I have explored the demographics of users income band, disposable income, political persuasion, lifestyle habits and quite a few other considerations. I have also looked into the history of the various manufacturers, their history both in terms of development and product support. I have trawled through numerous forums, blogs and social media sites on the subject.........and I have come to the conclusion that,

TI is the best and everything else is shit (except Atari)..............................



#40 Opry99er OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Mar 4, 2017 12:52 PM

^^church^^

#41 MarkO OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Mar 5, 2017 12:25 AM

AtariAge is the only gaming forum I've ever been a member of, now that I think of it. It's just a great one-stop shop, as it were. If it weren't for the branding and slight emphasis on Atari systems (which has been diluted over the years by the increasing number of non-Atari subforums), AA should really change its name to "VideoGameAge" or something. :-D

I hadn't considered that Commodore forums like Lemon64 and Denial are very active, and thus there's not much incentive for them to come here, I guess. Could be similar with Apple and Radio Shack enthusiasts, but all I ever hear about regarding those are Facebook groups, or Yahoo groups that may as well not exist.

 

Being a Very Long Time Apple ][ and Commodore owner, and recently returning to Active User of Classic Computers, and Adding the Tandy Color Computer to my "collection", I have been "Scouring the Internet" looking for Information on the Apple ][, the Commodore and the Tandy CoCo ( and Sinclair ZX-81/TS1000 )..

 

As JamesD mentioned earlier, the Apple ][ has quite a few Active Sites on the Internet, plus a Main FaceBook Group, plus a few Specialized Groups, like Apple II Game Programming and Apple Graphics and Arcade Game Design Enthusiasts.

 

The MacGUI Site, has an Excellent Archive of Applications, plus the Apple ][ Forums from the Genie On-Line Service have been put there as well..  Another Excellent  Archive is Asimov's FTP Site..

 

And there is still a lot of activity on UseNet for the Apple ][..

 

 

The  Tandy CoCo still has a ListServe run from maltedmedia.com, plus some Excellent Archive Sites, like The TRS-80 Color Computer Archive and The TRS-80/Tandy Color Computer COCO SuperSite.  Plus the CoCo's Version of OS9.

 

Both the Apple ][ and Tandy CoCo have active Groups on FaceBook...   Also, Jason Scott of archive.org has backed a lot of the Apple ][ Sites up, on archive.org..  CoCo enthusiasts are encouraged to Upload to archive.org, as well as any other Computer  Enthusiasts..  Upload it ALL, and Sort it Out Later...

 

I know from the Apple ][ FaceBook Group, a "fair number" of the members, never had an Apple ][, BITD, but used them at School, ( USA, Canada, and Australia ), and now can afford to purchase one, ( or more ) in addition to their original Classic Computer..

 

I found my way to AtariAge, ( and AppleFritter, and what is now VCFED ) because of Google Searches for a Specific Topic.. 

 

I "hang around" in the TI99/4 Forum, because, "Everything is Related"..      ( How about the F18 for the TI, that can be added to the Apple ][ as well...  ;) )

 

MarkO


Edited by MarkO, Sun Mar 5, 2017 12:28 AM.


#42 carlsson ONLINE  

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Posted Sun Mar 5, 2017 11:21 AM

News to me, must be something recent, couldnt give away a used one a couple years ago. Hopefully cool retro games being made!

I see your point. Even on this side of the pond, where vintage computers always have tended to be more expensive than in the US, I saw plenty of complete in box TI-99/4A's around 2009-2010 which barely got sold at ~$25 each, compared to a comparable C64C which would sell at ~$40 and most other systems bringing in ~$50 or more. However the likelyhood to being able to sell a system doesn't neccessarily relate to the community size of people already using it, perhaps though it says something about the growth potential if new users can't be attracted by a relatively low price.

 

I understand though that the price points have been pushed upwards by quite a lot in the past 7-8 years, not only on TI but on every single bit of vintage computing and gaming. The relative market values may have been adjusted too.



#43 Opry99er OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Mar 5, 2017 1:53 PM

TIs and the peripherals have doubled in price in the last 8 or so years.

#44 --- Ω --- OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Mar 5, 2017 4:19 PM

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#45 OLD CS1 OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Mar 5, 2017 6:12 PM

TIs and the peripherals have doubled in price in the last 8 or so years.

 

Sadly, Amiga stuff, too.  I bought a Picasso IV ten years ago for $280, and I recently saw one go for around $600, as an example.  CPU accelerators are just stupid and I have pretty much given up ever getting my hands on a CyberStorm PPC for my 4000D.

 

As for my TI stuff, I think I picked up the bulk of it right before the ramp-up in pricing (between 2010 and 2012.)



#46 Opry99er OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Mar 5, 2017 7:13 PM

I would love to get most of what I had back... I had to sell much of my good stuff to make rent back then... Sad...

Now I barely have enough stuff to cobble together a working rig.

I miss my GRAM Krscker, my Triple Tech card, RAMDisk, Exceltec Extended BASIC, Mechatronics XB (w/Apesoft routines) and my 6 factory sealed consoles. All gone to pay rent in my mid 20s.

Now, a GRAM Kracker runs over $600 if it ever even comes up.

#47 Willsy OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Mar 6, 2017 6:28 AM

I would love to get most of what I had back... I had to sell much of my good stuff to make rent back then... Sad...

Now I barely have enough stuff to cobble together a working rig.

I miss my GRAM Krscker, my Triple Tech card, RAMDisk, Exceltec Extended BASIC, Mechatronics XB (w/Apesoft routines) and my 6 factory sealed consoles. All gone to pay rent in my mid 20s.

Now, a GRAM Kracker runs over $600 if it ever even comes up.

 

Word. I had some awesome gear years ago but sold it all. The guy I sold to still has it in storage, has never used it (I sold it to him 20 years ago!) yet doesn't want to sell it.

 

Since then I got myself a Geneve, and a fully expanded Michael Becker SGCPU system.

 

Screw him ;-)



#48 --- Ω --- OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Mar 6, 2017 6:44 AM

I'm beginning to wonder if the price bubble on the TI is going to pop soon.  With these new pieces of hardware being developed, people are now able to do things at a fraction of the price that only a year ago would have REQUIRED a more expensive disk system.



#49 Grimakis OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Mar 6, 2017 7:12 AM

Ti 99/4A computers themselves are fairly cheap. Among the cheapest of the well-known vintage computers.

 

Somehow I still don't have one.

 

Best,

George



#50 BassGuitari OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Mar 6, 2017 10:10 AM

Ti 99/4A computers themselves are fairly cheap. Among the cheapest of the well-known vintage computers.

Truth. If you just want a system and some cartridges, maybe a tape drive, the TI99/4a is pretty cheap. Most of the best games came out on cartridge anyway, IMO (although Tunnels of Doom and the Adventure games require a tape or disk system).






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