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Developers/testing required for mini-itx clone system - ÉclaireXL


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#126 JoSch OFFLINE  

JoSch

    Moonsweeper

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 9:22 AM

I developed the TK-II firmware in a high level visual programming language called FlowCode which does go through an interim C compiler (Boost C) and then into machine code. If you think it will be of any help I can give you the C code, but keep in mind that it won't be commented, nor pretty, or efficient since there is a lot of extraneous code associated with this process. Still interested?

- Michael

I'd be interested in the C code, too.



#127 foft OFFLINE  

foft

    Dragonstomper

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 12:20 PM

I developed the TK-II firmware in a high level visual programming language called FlowCode which does go through an interim C compiler (Boost C) and then into machine code. If you think it will be of any help I can give you the C code, but keep in mind that it won't be commented, nor pretty, or efficient since there is a lot of extraneous code associated with this process. Still interested?

- Michael


Yes please. Is there a manual too?

#128 mytekcontrols OFFLINE  

mytekcontrols

    Stargunner

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 2:41 PM

Yes please. Is there a manual too?

 

A manual? I wish  ;)  best I can do for the moment is point you to HERE.

 

And here's the C code for the latest TK-II firmware: Attached File  TK-II-OS_V1_9X.c.zip   30.03KB   16 downloads

 

I was surprised to see that comments from my FlowCode got integrated into the C code. Now as I said earlier this isn't going to be very pretty, and there were a few quick and dirty solutions implemented to filter keystrokes in various ways. But in a nut shell what the code does is first translate the PS2 keyboard scan codes into a more logical format via a table (gets rid of all the unused spaces in the key map). This is then converted to upper and lowercase ASCII. And finally into actual Pokey expected key codes. So this covers the minimum that is required to get stuff to happen when pressing a key. On top of this there are routines for sending macro strings to Pokey, for recording macros, and some other stuff related to handling Cap Lock and navigation. Also there are routines for initializing the keyboard, turning on or off LED's, or re-initializing a keyboard after hot-plugging.

 

Have fun going through my code  :grin:

 

- Michael



#129 seastalker OFFLINE  

seastalker

    Star Raider

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Posted Sat Jul 1, 2017 10:25 AM

RE: alternative cases. Would this fit in any vintage floppy drive case be it Atari, Commodore or Apple?



#130 Larry OFFLINE  

Larry

    River Patroller

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Posted Mon Jul 17, 2017 7:46 AM

I've got to admit that I find myself getting more and more interested in these projects.  Especially if there is some hope of getting an Atari-similar keyboard for either/both.  PC keyboards are great for a PC (especially since many/most operations are done with a mouse).  But IMO an Atari needs an Atari keyboard.  Hope the WASD idea works out.  Wireless would be awesome, but maybe too much to hope for, and probably only even possible on the Eclaire XL. (?)  A good smooth mouse for Eclaire?

 

-Larry






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