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Atari collector demographics


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#26 BassGuitari OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jun 6, 2017 10:39 AM

When I was in junior high, one of my good friends and his dad were real car buffs, and his dad actually had a Model T that they restored. They drove it to my house once, but we lived on a hill and the T couldn't get back up while in gear--they had to go back up in reverse. :rolling: (Nevermind that it took 10 minutes of f@#$ing around with the crank to get it started first...)

Nah, if any game system is the Model T, it's the Odyssey. The Atari VCS is more like the VW Beetle, only without the Nazi heritage.



#27 Kosmic Stardust OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Jun 7, 2017 12:40 AM

When I was in junior high, one of my good friends and his dad were real car buffs, and his dad actually had a Model T that they restored. They drove it to my house once, but we lived on a hill and the T couldn't get back up while in gear--they had to go back up in reverse. :rolling: (Nevermind that it took 10 minutes of f@#$ing around with the crank to get it started first...)

Nah, if any game system is the Model T, it's the Odyssey. The Atari VCS is more like the VW Beetle, only without the Nazi heritage.

I could be mistaken, but isn't the reverse gear actually lower ratio than 1st gear on many transmissions, seeing as how you're not supposed to go fast while driving backwards? I've heard stories about trucks pushing stuff in reverse for that exact reason: lower gear ratio = more torque compared to first...



#28 sramirez2008 OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Jun 7, 2017 12:38 PM

^Model T (Atari) won't help you pick up chicks though. A '57 Chevy Belair (NES) will.

 

On second thought, not sure how any video game console will help you pick up chicks. You may have to get lucky, or swoon her with other admirable qualities.

 

Chicks dig the Trak-Ball. 

 

CX80.jpg



#29 RaccoonyDave OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Jun 7, 2017 8:34 PM

You have to have "been there at the time" or be interested in the history/chronology/evolution of video gaming to appreciate the VCS.
 

While I don't know if we are a significant number or not, I'm one of those collectors/enthousiasts that didn't live through the VCS era.

I'm 30 years old and about a year ago I got an Atari to experience the infancy of video game design and to experience the genius that went into making games on such limited hardware.

Before that, the only experience I had with the Atari was buying Activision Classic for the ps1 as a teen. In a sense I played the VCS before last year, but I had never used the classic joystick.

In short, I might not have the nostalgia or truly get the buzz from it's hay day, but I LOVE the VCS. I appreciate it's history and legacy, but mostly I appreciate the simple fun of it's game.

#30 Kosmic Stardust OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Jun 7, 2017 11:54 PM

While I don't know if we are a significant number or not, I'm one of those collectors/enthousiasts that didn't live through the VCS era.
 

Seconded. I was born in 1981 and was still in diapers when the VCS peaked, and by the time I joined the first grade and started thinking about video games, NES was the talk of the schoolyard. I didn't have an NES growing up but got plenty of exposure to it at friends' houses where I developed a healthy nostalgia for it even if by just watching others play.

 

One kid across the street had an Atari 8-bit computer and I distinctly remember the CX-40 style joystick, and my elementary school had some computers (I cannot for the life of me remember what company made the PCs but the graphics were ugly super-saturated 8-color and all we had to play were typing word and number games), but everyone else passed off PCs as "edutainment" junk. NES had far better graphics than most early/mid 80s computers, and pre-crash consoles might as well have been buried dinosaur fossils for all we knew.

 

So I only exposed myself to Atari decades later by reading up about much of the lies spread about it on the internet and though to myself, "It can't really be this bad, can it?" In spring 2012 I finally got my first Atari and also read the book "racing the beam" which gave me an appreciation and understanding of the hardware (in layman's terms) which I carry to this day. I really fell in love with the system and the homebrew community surrounding it, which lead me to the conclusion that nostalgia can be had by experiencing anything from a former time, irregardless of whether one had past memory associations or not.

 

And a lot of senile AA members disagree with my opinion that "nostalgia can be experienced without a memory reference" but if myself and others younger than I, generation Y to millenial, with little to no experience with a medium (in this instance Atari), can experience a child-like wonderment in playing these old games for the first time, then there is something more transcendental going on with retro games than simply reliving one's childhood.

 

Same goes for spinning old vinyl on my turntable and appreciating a period of music during which I was not alive, like Janis Joplin, Jimmy Hendrix, Led Zepplen I, II, III, IV, ect. Still don't care for the Beatles though, probably never will... :P



#31 atarilovesyou OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jun 8, 2017 8:26 PM

...don't worry: the Beatles will come.  I was the same way.  I picked up the boxed set of Stereo vinyl (sacrilege, I know...shoulda gone the mono route :D ) and experienced them sequentially through the catalog.  They are literally the masters of the universe.  Even though their music still isn't quite my jam, they are literally the masters of the universe.  You'll understand at some point.



#32 Kosmic Stardust OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Jun 9, 2017 12:38 AM

...don't worry: the Beatles will come.  I was the same way.  I picked up the boxed set of Stereo vinyl (sacrilege, I know...shoulda gone the mono route :D ) and experienced them sequentially through the catalog.  They are literally the masters of the universe.  Even though their music still isn't quite my jam, they are literally the masters of the universe.  You'll understand at some point.

Beatles are just too conservative for me. But Cheep Trick did a wicked cover of Mystery Tour so perhaps they should be revisited sometime. I love a lot of the early experimental sound from late 60s through the 70s though, and the Beatles were very clean and contemporary in that regard.

#33 Schizophretard OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Jun 9, 2017 5:10 AM

I'm 35 and was born in 1981. I have been into Atari since I could hold a joystick. In my experience growing up there wasn't as big of a generation gap between the people who played Atari and the NES as people make it seem today. Most of the people I knew growing up that played Atari was within my own age group and not older kids because they already moved on. It was mostly because of hand me downs just like it is today. Today an older brother gets a PS4 and hands down his PS3 to his little brother. Back then my older brother got an NES and handed me down the Atari VCS. And it was mostly the same for other Atari fans I knew. Either their older siblings, parents, uncles, cousins, etc. handed down their Ataris to us. There was also a lot of us getting brand new Atari 2600 Juniors after the NES was already out. So, I don't think the NES booming today has to do with a new generation of gamers entirely. Another part of it is that it was also more popular back then even within the same generation of gamers.



#34 Kosmic Stardust OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Jun 9, 2017 10:16 AM

I'm 35 and was born in 1981. I have been into Atari since I could hold a joystick. In my experience growing up there wasn't as big of a generation gap between the people who played Atari and the NES as people make it seem today. Most of the people I knew growing up that played Atari was within my own age group and not older kids because they already moved on. It was mostly because of hand me downs just like it is today. Today an older brother gets a PS4 and hands down his PS3 to his little brother. Back then my older brother got an NES and handed me down the Atari VCS. And it was mostly the same for other Atari fans I knew. Either their older siblings, parents, uncles, cousins, etc. handed down their Ataris to us. There was also a lot of us getting brand new Atari 2600 Juniors after the NES was already out. So, I don't think the NES booming today has to do with a new generation of gamers entirely. Another part of it is that it was also more popular back then even within the same generation of gamers.

I was an only child with no older siblings so of course my experience was different. I now love Atari for what it is, but the brand name did go downhill rapidly...

 

As for the hand me downs, I got my fair share of those so I can relate. My only name brand shoes growing up were hand-me-downs.



#35 glazball OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Jun 9, 2017 4:04 PM


And a lot of senile AA members disagree with my opinion that "nostalgia can be experienced without a memory reference" but if myself and others younger than I, generation Y to millenial, with little to no experience with a medium (in this instance Atari), can experience a child-like wonderment in playing these old games for the first time, then there is something more transcendental going on with retro games than simply reliving one's childhood.

 

Same goes for spinning old vinyl on my turntable and appreciating a period of music during which I was not alive, like Janis Joplin, Jimmy Hendrix, Led Zepplen I, II, III, IV, ect. Still don't care for the Beatles though, probably never will... :P

 

As someone only slightly older than you who did live through the 2600/VCS era, I can say that "appreciation" and "nostalgia" are TWO TOTALLY different things.  I love that you appreciate the 2600 if even you never experienced it as a youngster.

 

As I think back over my gaming history, it's pretty sad when I start to get nostalgic about nostalgia.  Around 1997, I got my family's 2600 down from my grandma's attic to take with me to college, and I have lots of memories of me and my 20-something friends doing lots of mind-altering substances and playing 4p Warlords long into the night!

 

btw, the Beatles ARE the masters of the universe and always will be.  I have nothing but appreciation (+ love, admiration, awe...) for them, though no nostalgia because they were gone long before I was born.



#36 Kosmic Stardust OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Jun 9, 2017 11:43 PM

 

As someone only slightly older than you who did live through the 2600/VCS era, I can say that "appreciation" and "nostalgia" are TWO TOTALLY different things.  I love that you appreciate the 2600 if even you never experienced it as a youngster.

 

So a 1982 game being experience for the first time in 1982 is nostalgia but said game being experienced for the first time in 2012 isn't. Explain.

 

I think it is safe to say that playing Atari 30 years removed brings me the same joy as it does you. And I love trying new stuff.



#37 glazball OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Jun 10, 2017 10:01 AM

Well nostalgia requires that you have a memory of something from your younger years. I appreciate the Beatles, an understatement because they are my favorite band, but I have no nostalgia for them because I wasn't alive when they were making records.

#38 Bucket Brigadier OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Jun 10, 2017 11:36 AM

I would normally have been outside of the age bracket that grew up with Atari (I'm 31), but our family had an Atari until around 1990 as our game system (it was a four-switch woodgrain VCS).  My earliest memories of playing video games were from Atari (specifically, Kaboom!, Space Invaders and Combat).  I sucked at all of them because I was so young, but the memories always stuck out as good ones because I was participating in something heretofore only my older brother and mom did (I was becoming a big kid!).  Around the time I was four, I remember playing some games our next-door neighbor had and being completely mind-blown by Defender because the screen scrolled and you had a radar atop the play field.  He also had Basketball and Pac Man, which I had no other reference to compare to, so I didn't think it was bad.  Shortly after (Christmas 1989), we got an NES, and our Atari actually broke just after that - good timing!

 

I got back into Atari when I was 14.  I remembered the games being fun, if simple, and picked up a Vader 2600 which was pretty cheap in 1999.  I cannot tell you how many hours me and my friends played that thing over the various summers during High School.  Heck, the start of what became my collection today really took off when one of my friends told his mom I picked an Atari up, and she donated about 40 games to me that were just sitting in storage.

 

The thing is, I don't play Atari for the nostalgia - I started my collection because of the memories from my early childhood, but I kept at it because the games are easy to learn, difficult to master, and a lot of fun.  Homebrews have expanded the horizon even further, but I'm still working on my Kaboom! score and have recently been trying to beat 100K on Millipede (just over 95K at the moment).  Emulators never get the paddles right, and there's just something about playing the original system on a CRT that can't be beat.  Hence, I continue to collect and play Atari to this day, and everyone I have introduced the system to who didn't have it as a kid has had a blast with it.



#39 atarilovesyou OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Jun 12, 2017 8:20 PM

Well nostalgia requires that you have a memory of something from your younger years. I appreciate the Beatles, an understatement because they are my favorite band, but I have no nostalgia for them because I wasn't alive when they were making records.

 

I'm not 100% in agreement with the fact that one must have experienced something firsthand to be considered nostalgic...if it is, then I have to find a new word to describe some of my far too numerous hobbies :D 

 

For instance, old Twilight Zone episodes...Alfred Hitchcock...stuff like that.  I LOVE that stuff...but the first time I ever saw an episode was, oddly enough, during a local tv stations "Nostalgia Weekend" where they played a whole weekend of black and white programming they used to do in previous decades.  The year I saw this was in 86, and I was instantly enthralled.  I've been a fan ever since...now, am I nostalgic for the time period that I saw the shows back in 86, or for a period of television that I never experienced first-hand?  Same goes for orginal series Star Trek.  Never watched them back in the day, but in syndication in the late 80s, early 90s.  I feel nostalgic about these shows, but never was a viewer during their initial broadcasts.

 

I guess we can dispose of the labels and just call it, "I like this shit" :D



#40 glazball OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 5:26 AM

 

I'm not 100% in agreement with the fact that one must have experienced something firsthand to be considered nostalgic...if it is, then I have to find a new word to describe some of my far too numerous hobbies :D

 

 

 

From dictionary.com:

 

nostalgia

noun

1. a wistful desire to return in thought or in fact to a former time in one's life, to one's home or homeland, or to one's family and friends; a sentimental yearning for the happiness of a former place or time:
a nostalgia for his college days.
2. something that elicits or displays nostalgia.

 

To use your example, the "Nostalgia Weekend" was aimed at older folks who originally watched Alfred Hitchcock, not you (assuming you were not alive in the late 50's).  That doesn't mean you couldn't also appreciate what those older folks had memories of.  Moreover, you could say that you have nostalgia for that time and place in 86 when you binge watched Alfred Hitchcock while staying over at your friend Jason's house.  But without that context, if you told a stranger that you are nostalgic for Alfred Hitchcock Presents, he/she would probably look at you funny.  "Appreciation" for things before your time might be a better word.


Edited by glazball, Tue Jun 13, 2017 5:56 AM.


#41 Schizophretard OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 6:48 AM

I was an only child with no older siblings so of course my experience was different. I now love Atari for what it is, but the brand name did go downhill rapidly...

 

As for the hand me downs, I got my fair share of those so I can relate. My only name brand shoes growing up were hand-me-downs.

 

I agree that the Atari brand did go down rapidly but I think the perception that there is a bigger generation gap between Atari(as well as other pre-crash systems) and the NES than say the NES and SNES has to do with something else. Give or take a few years, something changed around the time we were born. For the first time there were people being born that didn't know of a time without programmable consoles. So, when I say that I grew up with Atari then I mean that literally as in I have no memories of there not being Atari, held the second player joystick before I could control it with my older brother and dad letting me pretend I am playing it when they are really controlling it, and then I start to really play it as soon as I am capable. Then the rest of my childhood included many more consoles being added to my experience. The same could be said for kids born after us holding an NES, Genesis, PlayStation, etc. controllers as toddlers and then more consoles added to their childhood experiences.

 

But for most of the Atari fans here that wasn't the case. Their childhood was more like Pong system, another Pong system, another Pong system, etc, then Atari. That is why most seem to be somewhere around 10 years or more older than us, talk about playing it in junior high and high school, talk about hanging out at arcades and coming home to play Atari, etc. So, when they say they grew up with Atari they mean something more like when I say I grew up with the original PlayStation and when I say that I grew up with Atari that is like if they said that they grew up with Pong. There were programmable consoles before the PlayStation. So, I can go farther back to other consoles like Atari. But they can't. Programmable consoles where introduced when they were already halfway or more grown up.  

 

This causes a perception that there is a bigger generation gap between Atari and NES than NES and SNES, SNES and N64, etc. when there isn't because around the time we were born "I grew up with..." started to have a different meaning. Therefore, Atari isn't any different than all the consoles after it. There were those who started as fans as little kids all the way up to those that started as adults. It's just many of the Atari fans that were teens and adults at the time only had Pong systems before that which isn't as exciting and has less to talk about than programmable consoles. I grew up with Atari but they grew up with Pong. In other words, the perceived bigger generation gap between those who grew up with Atari and those who grew up with the NES is really a representation of the gap between Pong systems and the NES instead of Atari and the NES.

 

The kids have to also be considered in the demographic. Kids that now are only 35 instead of 50.



#42 troff OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 7:04 AM

 

 

"Appreciation" for things before your time might be a better word.

 

I know we're delving into the semantic weeds here, but "Appreciation" isn't the right word for the feeling that is trying to be described here.  While I am truly nostalgic about the VCS as I got my first one when I was 7, I actually do understand this idea of being "nostalgic" about something that you weren't alive to appreciate when it was new.  For me, I can appreciate all sort of neat culture that we have inherited from previous generations.  I listen to and love a lot of old music from times before my own. 

 

But, for me, there is something different about the 50s.  I just relish the idea of cruising around in a new 50s convertible, listened to Doo Wop on the AM radio, with a cute girl in a poodle skirt and a pony tail sitting next to me.  Of course, we'd have to stop for some malted chocolate shakes.  I can picture it vividly in my mind and would love to go back and experience it first hand.  I more than appreciate it, I have an emotional connection to it I don't have to other times.  (Perhaps this is all driven by watching Back to the Future too much in the 80s!)

 

I guess the point is that appreciation sounds too academic and not emotional enough.  Nostalgia is a longing to go back to previous experiences.  Perhaps we need another word for an emotional longing to go back and capture something you missed out on, but wished you hadn't.  (Versus just appreciating a certain thing and it's place in the flow of time).



#43 Schizophretard OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 7:23 AM

Well nostalgia requires that you have a memory of something from your younger years. I appreciate the Beatles, an understatement because they are my favorite band, but I have no nostalgia for them because I wasn't alive when they were making records.

 

But what if you were a fan in your younger years? Could listening to Beatles music make you feel nostalgic by bringing up childhood memories of listening to the Beatles in your younger years? 



#44 glazball OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 8:36 AM

 

But what if you were a fan in your younger years? Could listening to Beatles music make you feel nostalgic by bringing up childhood memories of listening to the Beatles in your younger years? 

 

Of course!  You can be nostalgic about anything, provided they are YOUR memories you are reflecting on.  For instance, maybe as a child your parents played the Beatles a lot.  You could be nostalgic about that one long car trip where your dad played every Beatles album back to back.  Or, nostalgic for those early years when you mom played lots of Beatles songs on the piano.  Nostalgia is a reflection or remembrance of a time and place that you yourself experienced.  And likewise, to say that you have nostalgia for The Beatles would imply that you were there in the screaming hordes of teenage girls screaming at the Fab Four at Shea Stadium, or watching them live on Ed Sullivan.

 

 

I know we're delving into the semantic weeds here, but "Appreciation" isn't the right word for the feeling that is trying to be described here...

 

I guess the point is that appreciation sounds too academic and not emotional enough.  Nostalgia is a longing to go back to previous experiences.  Perhaps we need another word for an emotional longing to go back and capture something you missed out on, but wished you hadn't.  (Versus just appreciating a certain thing and it's place in the flow of time).

 

I suppose you're right!  Appreciation isn't the best word, but a better word than nostalgia.  Let me use another example.  Have you ever been to a Renaissance festival?  You could say all the people there in costume having a good time "appreciate" (or a similar word) the era, but it wouldn't be correct to say they have any kind of nostalgia because that era was hundreds of years ago.  (ooth, you could say you are nostalgic for that Ren Faire you went to as a kid).  Whether it was the 1950's or 1550's, if you weren't there, there's no nostalgia.

 

To follow that thought, there will be a time soon when all of us who DID play Atari when it was new and current will be dead, and though the nostalgia for that time will be gone, hopefully there are enough game lovers who will continue to appreciate the Atari consoles and carry the torch onward, just like those Ren Faire people did, or lovers of Bach, Beethoven and the Beatles.


Edited by glazball, Tue Jun 13, 2017 9:01 AM.


#45 Torr OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 11:42 AM

nostalgia

noun

1. a wistful desire to return in thought or in fact to a former time in one's life, to one's home or homeland, or to one's family and friends; a sentimental yearning for the happiness of a former place or time:
 

 

 

I think THAT statement, particularly after a semi-colon, proves you can be nostalgic for something you never experienced, although I wouldn't have agreed before.

 

That is,

If watching The Andy Griffith Show gives one  a sentimental yearning for the happiness of a former place or time

Then by definition, that IS nostalgia, regardless of what year you were born.

 

EDIT: Hehe... however a lookup of the definition of Sentimental keeps referencing nostalgia! Kind of a loop here...

Would a 20-something today have a sentimental yearning for the days of Andy and Opie, or just a plain yearning?

Do I have to look up yearning now?


Edited by Torr, Tue Jun 13, 2017 11:48 AM.


#46 Kosmic Stardust OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 12:48 PM

 

 

I suppose you're right!  Appreciation isn't the best word, but a better word than nostalgia.  Let me use another example.  Have you ever been to a Renaissance festival?  You could say all the people there in costume having a good time "appreciate" (or a similar word) the era, but it wouldn't be correct to say they have any kind of nostalgia because that era was hundreds of years ago.  (ooth, you could say you are nostalgic for that Ren Faire you went to as a kid).  Whether it was the 1950's or 1550's, if you weren't there, there's no nostalgia.

 

I went to a renaissance fair in Virginia as a teen. It was awesome. But humor me for a minute. If one could just drop into 15th or 16th century Europe, it would not look like this. You have peasants basically working as slaves so they can eat, commoners can't read because there is no public education, rats, rotten food, chamber pots being dumped in the streets, Bubonic plague, usage of techniques like leeches/bloodletting to cure sick people, holy wars, protestants being executed by Catholics, Catholics being executed by protestants, and if you happen to be Jewish or Muslim, forget it, corrupt papal rule extorting citizens and even taxing kings and monarchs, and the list goes on and on...

 

I don't think anyone who lived in 15th century Europe would have nostalgia for the time period if they were alive today, given the hardships people endured then. Name one person who is nostalgic for plagues and holy wars. Didn't think so. But the renaissance fair, celebrates nostalgia by erasing all the ugly parts of history. Just like today nobody is nostalgic for the rampant segregation that existed in the 1950s (unless they are a clansman or supremacist) but many are nostalgic for the music, cars, culture, and diners of the time. And yes, if I walk into a 50s diner, I feel that nostalgia even if it isn't real or an accurate portrayal of life in the 50s.



#47 ubersaurus OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 2:28 PM

This thread went to a weird place.

 

1: You can be nostalgic for an old game system even if you weren't playing it in its heyday. I have nostalgia for intellivision even though I didn't get one until like 1992 - I was still playing it as a kid. I'm nostalgic for playing Spacewar online with my friends in college in the 2000s, for god's sake. As long as you have an emotional connection to something a while after the fact, it counts. If it's new to you and you're just enjoying it, then that's really more appreciating the item in question.

 

2: You absolutely don't have to have been there to dig classic game machines. My friend has a son who adores his intellivision, Atari, and NES games, and the kid is like 8. I was playing the 2600 in the late 80s and loved it all the way to today. I've introduced friends to the 2600 who had never messed with it before by picking out games I knew would be in their wheelhouse. Maybe not everyone is going to get into Street Racer, but you can probably grab the right person with something like River Raid, HERO, Fast Food or Solaris.

 

3: The Beatles are a decent boy band, but gimme the Rolling Stones any day of the week.



#48 glazball OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 3:05 PM


If watching The Andy Griffith Show gives one  a sentimental yearning for the happiness of a former place or time

Then by definition, that IS nostalgia, regardless of what year you were born.

 

I see your point here Torr, but I have to respectfully disagree.  That part of the definition after the semicolon doesn't include "in one's life" but it is assumed since it is attached to the first part.  Otherwise, it would have it's own separate numeral.

 

The Greek root of nostalgia means literally "return home."  It involves your personal memories and experiences.

 

To use Stardust's example, that diner may be filled with "50's nostalgia" but only for older folks who were alive in the 50's.  For everyone else, it's "50's memorabilia."

 


1: You can be nostalgic for an old game system even if you weren't playing it in its heyday. I have nostalgia for intellivision even though I didn't get one until like 1992 - I was still playing it as a kid. I'm nostalgic for playing Spacewar online with my friends in college in the 2000s, for god's sake. As long as you have an emotional connection to something a while after the fact, it counts. If it's new to you and you're just enjoying it, then that's really more appreciating the item in question.

 

2: You absolutely don't have to have been there to dig classic game machines. My friend has a son who adores his intellivision, Atari, and NES games, and the kid is like 8. I was playing the 2600 in the late 80s and loved it all the way to today. I've introduced friends to the 2600 who had never messed with it before by picking out games I knew would be in their wheelhouse. Maybe not everyone is going to get into Street Racer, but you can probably grab the right person with something like River Raid, HERO, Fast Food or Solaris.

 

3: The Beatles are a decent boy band, but gimme the Rolling Stones any day of the week.

 

1. Not really.  I feel like I know more than most about video games, but until a few years ago, I had NO IDEA the Bally Arcade/Astrocade was ever a thing.  I have one now, and I love it, but I can't claim to have any nostalgia for it.  The nostalgia you feel for Spacewar in 2000 relates to your college experience around that time with friends, not the original Spacewar time frame.

2.  True!  See Astrocade above.

3.  There'd be no Stones without the Beatles :P~~~



#49 Schizophretard OFFLINE  

Schizophretard

    River Patroller

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Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 3:56 PM

 

Of course!  You can be nostalgic about anything, provided they are YOUR memories you are reflecting on.  For instance, maybe as a child your parents played the Beatles a lot.  You could be nostalgic about that one long car trip where your dad played every Beatles album back to back.  Or, nostalgic for those early years when you mom played lots of Beatles songs on the piano.  Nostalgia is a reflection or remembrance of a time and place that you yourself experienced.  And likewise, to say that you have nostalgia for The Beatles would imply that you were there in the screaming hordes of teenage girls screaming at the Fab Four at Shea Stadium, or watching them live on Ed Sullivan.

 

That doesn't make any sense. That is like saying that someone today could feel nostalgia for The Wizard of Oz because they watched it as a kid on VHS but once they say they feel that nostalgia it implies something else like they saw it in the theaters in 1939 or read the book in 1900. If it has to do with your memories then expressing it only implies something about your memories and not something else. The whole point of creative works like books, movies, TV shows, music, videogames, etc. is to create experiences that don't need to be experienced live and, therefore, expressing nostalgia about them doesn't necessarily imply that they are talking about the very first time it was possible for anyone to have experiences of them. I was born September 12, 1981. I can't have any memories before that date to be nostalgic about but those memories aren't limited to things that only came to be on or after that date because on that date there were all kinds of things from the past that were preserved for me to experience to form memories to feel nostalgic about. 



#50 glazball OFFLINE  

glazball

    Moonsweeper

  • 399 posts
  • Location:Austin, TX

Posted Tue Jun 13, 2017 5:24 PM

What you are describing is not nostalgia Schizo.

 

If you were born in 1981 and you say you are "nostalgic for Wizard of Oz", it implies that you were there on or around the time or era when Wizard of Oz was a current movie event.  What you are trying to describe is a nostalgia for a younger, happier time in your life when you saw and loved/appreciated/adored/enjoyed Wizard of Oz.

 

If you were to say you are "nostalgic for The Wizard", it implies you were there on or around the time Fred Savage's mute little brother was getting his SMB3 on.  I was there for that just like you, and it is a bit of nostalgia for me (and hopefully you too!)

 

My stepson, who is 12 (born in 2004, jeez) has seen both and will hopefully later have some nostalgia of hanging out with his goofy stepdad who made him watch a 90-minute advertisement for Nintendo, but will never really know the time and place in which either movie happened (late 30's or late 80's).

 

I totally understand your point about lasting works of creativity as it what makes us human and it's probably the greatest thing we've ever done as a species.  Let's imagine we are cavemen before there was even a system of writing.  If you make it to an old age, you might feel nostalgic for a time when your mom picked lice from your hair as a young troglodyte because you were happy and carefree, and now you have to pick your own lice out.  Or screw it, let 'em be.






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