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#1 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Aug 24, 2017 6:30 AM

Third party companies like Wico and Suncom started making controllers for the ColecoVision/ADAM around the year 1983 (There was even a third party company that made the Super-Stick CC for the ColecoVision/ADAM). Coleco even made miniature Arcade toy figures for games like Donkey Kong. Third party companies made fancy stick on Donkey Kong characters with moving eyes for around 99 cents and some people were able to purchase those for as low as 33 cents on clearance. Hallmark got into Pacman and Ms. Pacman arcade stickers.

 

There was a big bubble in videogame systems and computers that peaked around 1982. Then between 1983 to 1985 a video game system and home computer crash occurred since there was literally to many different systems on the market. Coleco was effected big time by the crash and they completely stopped making computers and videogames in January of 1985.

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • DONKEY KONG ARCADE FIGURE.JPG
  • DONKEY KONG ARCADE FIGURE PIC2.JPG
  • DONKEY KONG STICKERS.JPG
  • PACAMAN AND MS. PACMAN STICKERS.JPG

Attached Files


Edited by HDTV1080P, Thu Aug 24, 2017 6:51 AM.


#2 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Aug 24, 2017 7:36 PM

I use to own both the portable Coleco Quiz Wiz unit and the portable Coleco Electronic Quarterback football game that is located in both the 1978 and 1979 Coleco catalogs. Both of these products broke over the years, and I believe they were tossed out. When I use to play the portable Electronic Quarterback game it was enjoyable as my first handheld videogame, however the graphics were nothing more then red dashes that looked like this _ _ _   Each red dash was a football player and one had to move their red dash to the other side of the screen to make a touchdown without running into other players. It was the latest in state of the art handheld portable videogames. However, people would laugh at it today for its terrible graphics and beeping sound. The home pong machines that hooked up to a TV had better quality graphics and sound. As far as I can remember, I never did own another portable videogame device, in 1982 I fell in love with the ColecoVision at home and in 1983 the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer. Today in the 21st Century people can emulate a real ColecoVision/ADAM using special emulation software on a portable Smartphone or portable handheld tablet PC since technology has improved so much.   

 

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#3 nick3092 OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:14 PM

I have both the Wico Command Control and the Suncom Joy Sensor from when I was a kid. I think my parents got sick of going through broken Coleco controllers when we were growing up and were willing to try and find something that would last longer. . At one point they even bought some white Adam controllers I still have. Probably on clearance at the time. Little did they know that all they needed to work again was some contact cleaner! I've had a 98% success rate in restoring regular and super action controllers with some deoxit.

The production Wico Command Control looks slightly different that the one in the scan. It almost looks more like an Intv controller in the way it looks like an overlay would slide in from the top. It also had 4 side fire buttons like an Intv controller. The Joy Sensor does have a slot on the right side to insert an overlay. I don't recall how well overlays worked with it. And my overlays are currently packed away, so I can't test them right now.

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_3289.JPG

Edited by nick3092, Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:15 PM.


#4 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 25, 2017 7:16 PM

In the 1980’s there was a third party company called Eve Electronic Systems. They made hardware products for the Coleco ADAM system. There was an EVE speech synthesizer unit with a clock calendar that plugged into the side of the ADAM. One could type words that were in a dictionary and for the first time the ADAM computer could speak (Of course there were some ColecoVision games that spoke a few words that did not need any special speech device connected). I use to have the EVE speech synthesizer but I sold it many years ago. It also had a built in real time data and time clock with a watch battery for power backup. Eve Electronics was the first company to make an 80 Column expansion system that only worked under the CP/M operating system. EVE Electronics also had a parallel Interface unit so one could connect a parallel printer like a Laser printer.  Attached is the EVE Electronic Systems catalog #3 front cover.

 

The only disadvantage of the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer was that the 1982 ColecoVision base unit only had RF channel 3 and 4 output. In 1983 and especially in the years to come, some ADAM owners were switching to the standalone ADAM system, since the standalone ADAM had the better quality composite video output with RCA audio once the Coleco DIN monitor cable was connected. Coleco made a special monitor cable for the standalone ADAM that was sold separately, however it was rare item to find since it was made in very small quantities (Many third party companies came up with their own ADAM composite video and audio cable since it was almost impossible to find the original Coleco version). The standalone ADAM used a DIN plug for audio and video output. The standalone ADAM also had composite video RCA jack and RF channel 3/4 RCA jack, but that special DIN plug was needed if one wanted both composite video with audio. Back in 1983 and even in the years to come, most people did not own a high-end CRT tube TV with composite video inputs. Most TV’s in use had RF antenna inputs with channel 3 and 4. One problem with the standalone ADAM is that it was only 99% compatible with ColecoVision cartridges. There were a few cartridges that did not run correctly on the standalone ADAM (like Defender, and at least one other). There was many cartridge backup programs for the ADAM computer that allowed one to copy up to 32K cartridge ROM images to a floppy disk or Digital Data Pack (Not until the 21st Century did someone make a ColecoVision game cartridge bigger then 32KB). Several cartridge rom images could fit on a 1.44MB 3.5 disk media. A computer programmer made modifications to Defender and other games so that they would run correctly on the standalone ADAM. Some people preferred the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer since the ColecoVision game system is 100% compatible with all game cartridges without any modification needing to be made, and also people liked the ColecoVision game system since it held two ColecoVision controllers inside its base unit case. Eve Electronics came out with the very first composite video modification conversion kit for the ColecoVision game system. This added a composite video output and an audio output to the ColecoVision game system and it also was 100% compatible with Expansion module #3 the ADAM computer.

 

Attached is a sample page of the EVE Electronics System catalog. Some third party company also made excellent dust covers for the ColecoVision, Expansion module #3 ADAM, and standalone ADAM. They covered the ADAM printer, keyboard, memory console, and ColecoVision. A couple sample pictures are attached of what the dust covers looked liked along with a sample picture of a third party ADAM composite monitor cable with audio.        

Attached Thumbnails

  • 3rd party   standalone ADAM composite video cable with audio.JPG
  • ColecoVision Dust Cover.JPG
  • ColecoVision Dust Cover PIC 2.JPG
  • STANDALONE ADAM DUST COVER.JPG
  • STANDALONE ADAM DUST COVER PIC 2.JPG
  • STANDALONE ADAM DUST COVER PIC 3.JPG
  • STANDALONE ADAM DUST COVER PIC 4.JPG
  • STANDALONE ADAM DUST COVER PIC 5.JPG

Attached Files


Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Aug 25, 2017 7:24 PM.


#5 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 25, 2017 7:41 PM

Here is a picture of a third party audio cassette tape that sold in retail stores. This was a one hour audio manual on how to use the ADAM computer.  

Attached Thumbnails

  • 3rd party ADAM audio manual.JPG


#6 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 25, 2017 7:51 PM

The Coleco ADAM came with nice quality set of instruction manuals. However as the system got a little cheaper in price a year or so later, the package of manuals started getting printed with less quality. For example the first edition of the SmartBasic manual had a color back and front with a professional binder style. The new revised SmarBasic manual was plain black and white and the text was harder to read (Plus this cheaper quality manual does not age well and is falling apart when opening it).

 

I get the feeling this thread is turning into a modern day show and tale:  

Attached Thumbnails

  • Coleco ADAM SmartBasic manuals.JPG


#7 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 25, 2017 8:16 PM

In 1983 the Coleco ADAM met Federal Communications standards for radio frequency interference acceptable levels. However, in 1984 Coleco found out that when people started adding additional controllers, and peripherals to the ADAM, that the interference levels were to high. Therefore starting in 1984 all Expansion module #3 ADAM computers and all standalone ADAM computers started shipping with a free RF-1 Kit that had special sleeves that would make sure the Coleco ADAM met FCC acceptable interference guidelines. These sleeves would shield RF noise and they were required to be installed on game controllers, RF TV output, and all AdamNet devices. People that did not use the better quality composite video output also discovered that the ColecoVision/ADAM RF channel 3 and 4 output could have improved picture and sound quality with less interference if the kit was installed. Also the shorter the connection cable to the TV will improve the picture and sound quality of the ColecoVision/ADAM system.

 

In mid to late 1984 Coleco got smart and the latest R80 memory consoles had built in RF-1 sleeves internally placed on the ADAMNet jacks and printer locations. This met that the RF-1 kit did not need to be used if the sleeves were already internally installed at the factory.

 

Attached is the Coleco ADAM RF-1 Kit PDF instruction sheet that came with many ADAM systems shipped out in 1984.    

Attached Thumbnails

  • ADAM RF-1 kit.JPG

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#8 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 25, 2017 8:37 PM

In 1983 everyone used 256K Digital Data Packs with the Coleco ADAM. Then in 1984 Coleco came out with a 160K 5.25 inch floppy Disk Drive for around $199.95, which made Digital Data Packs less popular. However most ADAM owners never experienced the Coleco disk drive since a small QTY were made before Coleco stopped computer and videogame production in January of 1985.

 

This is what the Digital Data Pack retail package looks like.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Digital Data Pack retail package.JPG
  • Digital Data Pack retail package PIC 2.JPG


#9 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Aug 25, 2017 11:15 PM

When Coleco designed Supergames and other programs for the ColecoVision and ADAM they used a unreleased in house program called “Graphics Design Cartridge”, which had the words Project Name by Line in the title screen. Also while playing a game on the ADAM computer or what every the image was on the screen at the time, as soon as one would hit the cartridge reset button the ADAM would do a screen capture and with this Graphics Design program the image could be modified. There was also a 19,200 baud option for Coleco’s unreleased parallel/serial interface so program developers could transfer data back and forth from a external computer and the ADAM computer.  

Attached Thumbnails

  • UNRELEASED IN HOUSE GRAPHICS DESIGN CARTRIDGE (Project Name by Line).JPG


#10 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:07 AM

ColecoVision owners no longer use the ColecoVision power supply after they purchased Expansion module #3 the ADAM computer. Both the standalone ADAM and the Expansion module #3 ADAM use the power supply in the ADAM printer to power the computer and the ColecoVision motherboard. The ADAM printer has always been a negative part of the ADAM with complaints going all the way back to 1983. A cost cutting decision by Coleco was to not develop a standalone power supply for the ADAM. All ADAM owners always had to use the ADAM printer to power the ADAM. Back in 1983 a letter quality Daisy wheel printer was nice, however the ADAM printer is also extremely noisy and can sometimes over heat since the power supply for the entire computer is inside the printer. Coleco should have designed a standalone power supply for the ADAM. If they would have did this then they could have released the ADAM without the printer for a few hundred dollars cheaper.

 

People that used external third party printer interfaces with a Laser printer or other external printer for the ADAM were forced to use the Adam printer also so that they could power their ADAM computer. As the ADAM printers started breaking down or were not being used anymore. People started tearing apart their ADAM printer and removing the computer system power supply from the printer. Many ADAM owners were also able to purchase the original Coleco printer power supply between 1985-1990 since Coleco sold a lot of spare parts to mail order companies. There were so many people taking the power supply out of their Coleco printer and/or buying the bare internal Coleco ADAM printer power supply from mail order companies, that third party companies started making a little plastic or metal case covers to screw on top of the bare Coleco printer power supply that powered the entire ADAM computer system.

 

Micro Innovations never released a power supply for the ADAM computer as far as I am aware. Many companies did not want to touch this issue. However, with 1MB and 2MB memory expanders hooked up to the ADAM along with other devices, the ADAM printer power supply could not output enough power. Some mail order companies in extremely small QTY’s developed external third party power supplies for the ADAM computer. They used an old ADAM power cord and converted a factory new 230WATT power supply so that it worked with the ADAM computer. This 230watt power supply was more than enough power to power anything hooked up to the ADAM including 2MB memory expanders and anything else located in the 3 internal slots. Also the 230watt PC power supply had a on off button with a internal fan. In addition, this external new 230watt power supply would power the Coleco ADAM printer when the printer was connected to the DB9 jack on the side of the power supply. One could leave the ADAM printer connected and hit the on/off switch on the printer when they wanted to turn on and off the printer. Since an external power supply was powering both the ADAM computer and the Coleco printer, the printer lasted longer since there was less heat occurring.

 

Pictured below is the Coleco ADAM printer, bare internal Coleco power supply that was inside the printer, and the 230watt third party ADAM power supply that was top of the line back in the late 80’s and early 90’s. In the future, it would be possible to re-release a ADAM power supply using either a modified PC power supply like pictured below or design a custom power supply made from scratch.

A lot of third party companies did not want to make a power supply for the ColecoVision and ADAM computer for various reasons. That is why products like pictured below are rare:      

Attached Thumbnails

  • COLECO ADAM PRINTER WITH BUILT IN POWER SUPPLY.JPG
  • COLECO ADAM PRINTER POWER SUPPLY.JPG
  • 3RD PARTY ADAM POWER SUPPLY.JPG
  • 3RD PARTY ADAM POWER SUPPLY PIC 2.JPG
  • 3RD PARTY ADAM POWER SUPPLY PIC 3.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P, Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:13 AM.


#11 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Aug 26, 2017 9:50 PM

Attached is a sample page from the Official unreleased in house Coleco technical manual that came in two parts. I am guessing this manual is most likely online somewhere now (This manual also shows how to create Supergames for the ADAM computer). Coleco released EOS 5 in the ADAM computers, however EOS 6 was completed but was unreleased. EOS 6 has less bugs when compared to EOS 5 and is 100% compatible with existing software (some people were able to get the Coleco EOS 6 rom image and place the eprom into their physical Coleco ADAM computers). OS 7 was finished by Coleco however there was an EOS 7 that Coleco was working on but did not finish. Walter’s Software EOS 9 is based on Coleco’s EOS 7 but with improvements. The ADAM Desktop cartridge rom image will install EOS 9 operating system when one pushes or pulls the cartridge reset button.   

Attached Thumbnails

  • Picture of Coleco technical manuals.JPG

Attached Files


Edited by HDTV1080P, Sat Aug 26, 2017 9:59 PM.


#12 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Aug 29, 2017 10:39 PM

I subscribed to many ADAM newsletters in the 1980’s. From 1985 to the 1990’s my absolute favorite newsletter on the ADAM computer was NIAD’s newsletter. NIAD was a Christian run business under the owner Lyle, Lyle would always put Jesus Christ first by publishing a Bible study on the front cover of every NIAD newsletter (Attached is a sample of the front cover). From various people I heard NIAD lost business because of their stand for Jesus Christ and being a Christian run business. However, NIAD might have gained more percentage of business then they lost since Christianity was more popular in the 20th Century and because NIAD had a reputation of being a honest ADAM USER Group one could trust to purchase products from.  

 

There also was a lot of misinformation coming out of Coleco in 1985 from both active and former Coleco employees. Depending on who one talked too, one did not know what the truth was. Remember this was back in the days before the Internet websites and email. All communication was done by mail and landline phone in general. For example if one searches the Internet there are some websites that claim over 6 million ColecoVision’s were sold, however the reality is only around 2 million ColecoVisions were sold. In addition, we now know that the Coleco ADAM went out of production in January 1985 and sold 500,000 ADAM computers maximum (some sources say 300,000-500,000 units sold). However back in 1985 it is my understanding that a Coleco employee was telling NIAD and other people that production on the ADAM did not stop until 12/85 and 950,000 ADAM computers were manufactured by Coleco. Attached is a scan of an October 1985 document form NIAD letter also making that claim. However according to the documentation we have today Coleco stopped making the ADAM in January of 1985 and a maximum of 500,000 ADAM’s were sold or manufactured.

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#13 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Aug 29, 2017 11:00 PM

Back on 9-14-91 a third party company produced a X10 Home Automation Interface and software for operating it for ADAM owners (attached is the info on that device).

 

Also at least a couple of different third party ADAM companies sold a MIDI interface for the ADAM.      

Attached Files


Edited by HDTV1080P, Tue Aug 29, 2017 11:01 PM.


#14 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Aug 29, 2017 11:58 PM

It is truly amazing the amount of research and development that Coleco did between 1981 to 1984. In addition, the amount of unreleased software and hardware prototypes that were either completely finished or mostly finished is incredible. Coleco had a fully functional RS-232/serial ADAMNet device that had been verified working by several people. It was rumored that Coleco was going to release the Dragon’s Lair game on the 12 inch optical Laserdisc format, however before that was a possibility they had to make a RS-232 interface for the ADAM so that modern 1983 Laserdisc players could be controlled by the ADAM computer.

 

Coleco developed an external 1200 baud hayes modem that was going to be released as a upgrade for people that had the internal 300 baud ADAM modem. In addition, several people I heard from said they saw a working internal 3.25 inch AdamNet disk drive which offered over 270K of storage space. Coleco was thinking about replacing the Digital Data Drives with internal 3.25 inch disk drives. Any type of disk drive would have been better than the Digital Data Drives.

 

It was ridiculous the amount of unreleased hardware and software that former Coleco employees took home before being laid off (After January 1985 many Coleco employees were laid off). Stories were told over the years that if the products were not taken home that Coleco would have ended up destroying the products.  

 

Back around June 5th 1993, various ADAM dealers and ADAM users groups received the following letter in the mail asking to trade unreleased Coleco ADAM prototype equipment for the latest brand new Micro innovations 1.44MB 3.5 inch disk drive. I have no ideal who ended up with these unreleased Coleco products. I have removed most the names and addresses from the attached 2 page letter below to protect their privacy. In addition, the source that provided this letter no longer had the attached photos for uploading.  

Attached Files


Edited by HDTV1080P, Wed Aug 30, 2017 12:20 AM.


#15 ed1475 OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 30, 2017 12:01 AM

Back on 9-14-91 a third party company produced a X10 Home Automation Interface and software for operating it for ADAM owners (attached is the info on that device).

   

 

That is really cool! 



#16 adamcon OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 30, 2017 6:01 AM

It is truly amazing the amount of research and development that Coleco did between 1981 to 1984. In addition, the amount of unreleased software and hardware prototypes that were either completely finished or mostly finished is incredible. Coleco had a fully functional RS-232/serial ADAMNet device that had been verified working by several people. It was rumored that Coleco was going to release the Dragon’s Lair game on the 12 inch optical Laserdisc format, however before that was a possibility they had to make a RS-232 interface for the ADAM so that modern 1983 Laserdisc players could be controlled by the ADAM computer.

 

Coleco developed an external 1200 baud hayes modem that was going to be released as a upgrade for people that had the internal 300 baud ADAM modem. In addition, several people I heard from said they saw a working internal 3.25 inch AdamNet disk drive which offered over 270K of storage space. Coleco was thinking about replacing the Digital Data Drives with internal 3.25 inch disk drives. Any type of disk drive would have been better than the Digital Data Drives.

 

It was ridiculous the amount of unreleased hardware and software that former Coleco employees took home before being laid off (After January 1985 many Coleco employees were laid off). Stories were told over the years that if the products were not taken home that Coleco would have ended up destroying the products.  

 

Back around June 5th 1993, various ADAM dealers and ADAM users groups received the following letter in the mail asking to trade unreleased Coleco ADAM prototype equipment for the latest brand new Micro innovations 1.44MB 3.5 inch disk drive. I have no ideal who ended up with these unreleased Coleco products. I have removed most the names and addresses from the attached 2 page letter below to protect their privacy. In addition, the source that provided this letter no longer had the attached photos for uploading.  

You are correct in that "story" about the 3 1/4" disk drive.  I have it as well as the one and only ADAMnet direct plug IDE hard drive.  I got them from 2 different sources, 1 at ADAMcon 10 and the other probably about ADAMcon 20 time period.  Both work great; the IDE hard drive requires a boot disk in order to redirect input/output to data drive 2 and works with no interface card needed; while the disk drive is in a cute li'l Coleco made case and takes the place of the cover on the ADAM with it's own power supply and ADAMnet plug in cable.  It holds 256k of data so it matches the data pack size.  As for the 1200 baud modem, my source for the disk drive had it but could not longer find it.



#17 mr_me OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 30, 2017 7:27 AM

I think the engineers at Coleco were trying to find a floppy drive that could fit into the old tape drive bay.  The letter indicates that the 3.25" floppy drive "plugged into the 8 and 9 pin jacks that the tape drives use".  There were a lot of different smaller sized floppy drives at the time; none were a widely used standard until later.


Edited by mr_me, Wed Aug 30, 2017 7:29 AM.


#18 adamcon OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 30, 2017 5:39 PM

I think the engineers at Coleco were trying to find a floppy drive that could fit into the old tape drive bay.  The letter indicates that the 3.25" floppy drive "plugged into the 8 and 9 pin jacks that the tape drives use".  There were a lot of different smaller sized floppy drives at the time; none were a widely used standard until later.

Dat letter was WRONG; I just went and pulled it out.  It uses a CV power supply and plugs direct into ADAMnet with a 6 wire "phone" cord.  The strange part is that Coleco made a very professional case for it with correct color plastic, and it fit in place of the cover over the expansion slots and data drives, but the controller board in the case is a wire wrap version.  For whatever reason Coleco picked the 3 1/4 to look at instead of the 3 1/2 which became the standard.



#19 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 30, 2017 6:10 PM

Here is a website that has pictures of the prototype. 

 

https://colecoadam.w...rive-prototype/

 

Sounds like Coleco was going to cut corners and go with 3.25 inch disk drives instead of the industry standard of 3.5 inch. Perhaps if the ADAM would have shipped with a Disk Drive instead of a Digital Data Drive and if the printer was optional, maybe the Coleco ADAM would have been more successful. To some the ADAM almost became a Apple or IBM but the quality control in October of 1983 stopped that from happening (Very negative press from the Smartwriter prom bug that froze the computer when they launched).  


Edited by HDTV1080P, Wed Aug 30, 2017 6:18 PM.


#20 mr_me OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 30, 2017 7:19 PM

The letter says there were different 3.25" floppy drive prototypes with both types of interfaces. The 3.5 floppy drives would have been way too expensive. The 3.25" floppy was really the same as the 5.25" floppy, only smaller. Ultimately Coleco didn't choose either 3.25 or 3.5", they chose the 5.25" floppy drive which was the IBM PC standard. Was the digital tape drive that bad?

Had everything gone smoothly with the Adam from the beginning, Coleco might have gotten some marketshare from the c-64 and survived a little longer. All the computer companies that were targeting the home market failed to survive.

#21 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 30, 2017 9:01 PM

The letter says there were different 3.25" floppy drive prototypes with both types of interfaces. The 3.5 floppy drives would have been way too expensive. The 3.25" floppy was really the same as the 5.25" floppy, only smaller. Ultimately Coleco didn't choose either 3.25 or 3.5", they chose the 5.25" floppy drive which was the IBM PC standard. Was the digital tape drive that bad?

Had everything gone smoothly with the Adam from the beginning, Coleco might have gotten some marketshare from the c-64 and survived a little longer. All the computer companies that were targeting the home market failed to survive.

Yes I heard about a second 3.25 inch prototype that plugged into the Digital Data Drive sockets (That socket also has access to ADAMnet). At one point they must have been thinking about a replacement for the Digital Data Drives. That would have been awesome if in 1983 or 1984 the ADAM computer would have had 3.25 inch disks instead of Digital Data Drives. I was also told by a reliable source that Coleco had a 320K double sided 5.25 inch disk drive prototype however in 1984 they decided to release a 160K single sided 5.25 inch disk drive for only $199.95. Most likely the 320K if it was released would have sold for at least $299.95. The only big negative about the Coleco disk drives was that they were 160K, and if one wanted to make a backup copy of a Digital Data Pack software, if the software program was between 161K-256K in size then it was not possible especially if it was a Supergame which required multi-loading for several different game screens.  

 

The Digital Data Drives were not that bad, they were only a major problem if one did not know how to use them (Not using them properly would chew up tapes or erase the data on them). By late 1984 the latest version of the Digital Data Drives were much more reliable, plus Digital Data Drives were much faster than manual cassettes and faster then some computers first generation floppy disk drive technology. 


Edited by HDTV1080P, Wed Aug 30, 2017 9:05 PM.


#22 NIAD OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 3, 2017 10:50 PM

Back on 9-14-91 a third party company produced a X10 Home Automation Interface and software for operating it for ADAM owners (attached is the info on that device).

 

Also at least a couple of different third party ADAM companies sold a MIDI interface for the ADAM.      

 

 

That is really cool! 

I actually won a complete X-10 Package that was part of a large raffle of items at ADAMcon IV in Cleveland, OH. I never used it and eventually sold it thru the NIAD Newsletter's "For Sale" section.



#23 NIAD OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 3, 2017 11:10 PM

Their are two of these 3 1/4" Floppy Disk Drive prototypes known to exist. The first was brought to light when Doug R. meet a former Coleco employee at his Church circa 1992. I think that this is the unit that ADAMcon is now in possession of.... lucky dog! The second is the one Howard E. has and Rich S. reported about on his website.



#24 NIAD OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 3, 2017 11:18 PM

 For whatever reason Coleco picked the 3 1/4 to look at instead of the 3 1/2 which became the standard

Where 3 1/2" Disk Drives even on the market in 1983? I don't seem to recall seeing them until a few years later. Anyway, the price would have been way too expensive to go this route. Te only options Coleco had as far as a disk drive were 3 1/4", 5 1/4" or 8" with the 5 1/4" standard being the obvious choice for Coleco to make. Although as it was pointed out, Coleco made the wrong decision again to go with a Single-Sided unit as a cost cutting measure.



#25 ed1475 OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Sep 4, 2017 6:30 PM

 

I actually won a complete X-10 Package that was part of a large raffle of items at ADAMcon IV in Cleveland, OH. I never used it and eventually sold it thru the NIAD Newsletter's "For Sale" section.

 

I had never heard of an X-10 system for the Adam until this thread.  I know it was released for other computers in the early 1980s and was planned for the Mattel Aquarius. 

 

I noticed there isn't a DSK or DDP image of the X-10 software on the internet yet.  If anyone still has a data pack or disk with this software I would be happy to convert it to an image and upload it here.


Edited by ed1475, Mon Sep 4, 2017 6:42 PM.





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