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#26 NIAD OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Sep 4, 2017 7:24 PM

 

I had never heard of an X-10 system for the Adam until this thread.  I know it was released for other computers in the early 1980s and was planned for the Mattel Aquarius. 

 

I noticed there isn't a DSK or DDP image of the X-10 software on the internet yet.  If anyone still has a data pack or disk with this software I would be happy to convert it to an image and upload it here.

The X-10 hardware used was not ADAM specific. You could buy the hardware in any electronics stores that carried it and then hook it up to the ADAM via one of the numerous Serial Interfaces that were available. To complete the package, you would need the software driver that was written by Chris Braymen for ADAMLink of Utah/Alan Neeley. I have attached the disk image which you probably already have in your collection, but didn't realize.

 

I don't recall the exact module number of the X10 hardware used or if it matters, but anyone with a Serial Interface and the software driver could get this all working on the ADAM. I guess it's time to do some searching thru the PDF newsletter... to bad we don't have PDF scans of the ADAMLink of Utah newsletter!

Attached Files



#27 ed1475 OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Sep 4, 2017 9:07 PM

The X-10 hardware used was not ADAM specific. You could buy the hardware in any electronics stores that carried it and then hook it up to the ADAM via one of the numerous Serial Interfaces that were available. To complete the package, you would need the software driver that was written by Chris Braymen for ADAMLink of Utah/Alan Neeley. I have attached the disk image which you probably already have in your collection, but didn't realize.

 

I don't recall the exact module number of the X10 hardware used or if it matters, but anyone with a Serial Interface and the software driver could get this all working on the ADAM. I guess it's time to do some searching thru the PDF newsletter... to bad we don't have PDF scans of the ADAMLink of Utah newsletter!

 

Thanks for the disk image.  I guess I did already have it. 



#28 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Sep 7, 2017 12:49 AM

This picture at the following website looks like the 1200 baud prototype modem was a ADAMNet external modem. The one Coleco released for the ADAM was a internal 300 baud modem. Over the years in the 80's and early 90's people were using 2400 baud, 9600 baud, and 19,200 baud modems with a third party modified version of ADAMLink V and/or CP/M modem software. People who owned Micro Innovations dual serial with parallel interface also could output in a 80 column terminal mode while online. In the late 20th Century DSL became popular then Cable modems became popular in the early 21st Century around 2002. However no third party company every developed a Ethernet jack for the ADAM computer as far as I am aware. This would have been ideal for people that are on a 100% wired Internet connection like CAT5e, CAT6, CAT6a, CAT7A, and CAT8. But of course the ADAM computer is not powerful enough to offer browsing capabilities like Internet Explorer 11 64 bit.  

 

https://colecoadam.w...200-baud-modem/


Edited by HDTV1080P, Thu Sep 7, 2017 12:55 AM.


#29 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Sep 15, 2017 1:33 AM

Here are some pictures of the ColecoVision, Expansion module #3 ADAM computer, and Standalone ADAM computer with and without the Supergame module. In addition, the Expansion Module #3 ADAM tray was thrown in the picture in case someone has not seen it before. It was common in the 80’s since it came with all the Expansion module #3 ADAM computers so that the ColecoVision would have a tight and accurate fit, since once the ADAM expansion is hooked up, there is no good reason why the average person would want to disconnect it.    

Attached Thumbnails

  • ColecoVision.JPG
  • ColecoVision with Supergame module.JPG
  • ColecoVision with Supergame module pic2.JPG
  • Expansion Module #3 ADAM tray.JPG
  • Expansion #3 ADAM computer.JPG
  • Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer with Supergame module.JPG
  • Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer with Supergame module pic2.JPG
  • Standalone ADAM.JPG
  • STANDALONE ADAM with Supergame module.JPG
  • STANDALONE ADAM with Supergame module pic2.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Sep 15, 2017 1:35 AM.


#30 Inky OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Sep 15, 2017 7:13 PM

In 1983 everyone used 256K Digital Data Packs with the Coleco ADAM. Then in 1984 Coleco came out with a 160K 5.25 inch floppy Disk Drive for around $199.95, which made Digital Data Packs less popular. However most ADAM owners never experienced the Coleco disk drive since a small QTY were made before Coleco stopped computer and videogame production in January of 1985.

 

This is what the Digital Data Pack retail package looks like.

 

The DDPs with the big label like that were actually pre-printed for ADAM software that was never released.  I had one like that once, and under the big label it read "Jeopardy"



#31 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Sep 15, 2017 8:14 PM

 

The DDPs with the big label like that were actually pre-printed for ADAM software that was never released.  I had one like that once, and under the big label it read "Jeopardy"

The Digital Data Pack big labels like you mentioned, the ones I peeled off are completely blank with no second label. Therefore, it must be a select few Digital Data Packs that have a second unreleased Coleco label under the main label. It sounds like what happen is Coleco was getting ready to release Jeopardy on Digital Data Pack, and at the last minute instead of releasing it, must have erased all the Jeopardy Digital Data Packs and popped a blank label on so that they could sale the Digital Data Packs as a blank. Its too bad Coleco did not release Jeopardy (A Coleco employee did copy the 256K Digital Data Pack to 160K disk and with a Coleco letter head claimed it was public domain and then it was sent to all the official ADAM dealers and clubs with the two copyrighted screens removed. Jeopardy in its unaltered state had two boot logos like Family Feud). There were rumors that they had color box art and manuals made up for Jeopardy (If true those might have been tossed away or a few select Coleco employees own those rare unreleased boxed copies).

 

Over the years what has kept the ColecoVision/ADAM interesting is all the stories of the unreleased hardware and software that the Coleco employees took home before the layoffs occurred. The items that were not taken home were either tossed out or the spare parts were used for other products or erased and relabeled. Some of the unreleased hardware and software (especially software since it can be copied by the average person), has been released into public domain.


Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Sep 15, 2017 8:23 PM.


#32 mr_me OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Sep 16, 2017 7:42 AM

Anyone have a copy of the Coleco letter about the game going public domain?

#33 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Sep 16, 2017 10:53 PM

Anyone have a copy of the Coleco letter about the game going public domain?

I never personally saw the Coleco letter. However in a monthly ADAM user group that I attended. There were a couple of people in that group that had connections to one or two former Coleco employees. At least one person was able to get a Coleco letterhead with the claim on the letter that Jeopardy was released into public domain. Then someone removed the two copyrighted boot logo screens and changed the one boot screen for Jeopardy to say public domain. Then the unreleased copies of Jeopardy along with Subroc the Supergame was sent to all the big ADAM dealers and USER groups like ADAM’s House and NIAD in 1985. Jeopardy and Trolls Tale is listed as public domain in ADAM House newsletters and NIAD newsletters. Take a look at page 20 of the January 1986 NIAD newsletter. There must be several thousands of copies of Jeopardy floating around since people could purchase it for basically for free with a cost of around $5 for the disk or Digital Data Pack copy from multiply sources. When I requested my copy of Jeopardy and Subroc the Supergame on disk, I asked for the unaltered version with the original copyrighted screen boot logos from the guy that distributed it to all or most of the ADAM dealers and ADAM user groups. In the March/April 1994 version of NIAD and also ADAM HOUSE newsletter, there were many more unreleased Coleco programs being offered for public domain with the small cost of around $3 for the disk. On page 22 of the March/April 1994 version of the NIAD issue Jeopardy, Troll’s Tale, Subroc the Supergame, Dam Busters the Supergame, Temple of Apshai, and the unreleased 5 screen version of Donkey Kong Junior the Supergame was being offered as public domain (many of these were being offered as early as 1985 and 1986 by various ADAM users groups and ADAM dealers). Walter’s software fixed some bugs with Jeopardy, Donkey Kong Junior the 5 screen version, and Temple of Apshai, along with other unreleased software. In the case with Jeopardy it was the original Coleco employee that copied a 256K Digital Data Pack to 160K floppy disk (program needed fixed so that it would not crash after the last question pack). In the case of Donkey Kong Junior the Supergame 5 screen version it was some minor issues that made the hidden 5th screen appear without the required secret Coleco code being entered.



#34 mr_me OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 9:30 AM

Thanks, these old newsletters are great. The Niad Jan 1986 newsletter says "Coleco has informed us that any software that has not been officially released by them and does not contain any trademark or copyright names can be released into public domain.". The problem is almost all Coleco games have secondary IP involved. Some trademarks might have since become inactive.

#35 NIAD OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 9:53 AM

All, or most, of these Coleco developed titles that were released to the Public Domain happened before I started working at NIAD, but I did see and read the Coleco letter that was mentioned in the previous post. It simply stated that all copyright/trademark information would have to be removed and if this could be done, the software was free to be used however one wanted... preferably shared freely with all ADAM owners via Public Domain.

This requirement to remove copyright/trademark information is why you will see different versions of these titles... some hacked to make these changes and some with all the original title screens with copyright/trademark info.

#36 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 19, 2017 4:02 PM

Back in the 80’s Toysrus sold many Coleco products including ColecoVision/ADAM products (In 1985 they had a good supply of ADAM disk drives and neat hard to find ADAM and ColecoVision products). Now it looks like that retailer might not be around to much longer. With the popularity of the Internet many retail stores are shutting down nationwide. Toysrus is $5 billion in debt and has filed chapter 11.

 

http://www.twice.com/news/retail/toys-r-us-joins-chapter-11-club/66092


Edited by HDTV1080P, Tue Sep 19, 2017 4:04 PM.


#37 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Sep 20, 2017 2:00 PM

I have read that Coleco was working on or planning on coming out with either a Laserdisc expansion module or the less reliable and cheaper RCA Video-disc system as an Expansion module. This would be used to play videogames like Dragon’s Lair with the exact same picture and sound quality as the original arcade version. This expansion module most likely would have been an expansion module for the ADAM computer system that used either a RS-232 port or a special ADAMNet interface box (Plus families would have been able to watch movies for entertainment, and not just the ability to play videogames). However, some articles I have read claim that Coleco was looking at the cheaper and less reliable RCA Video disc system instead of the Pioneer Laserdisc system. This would have been a mistake for two reasons. The first reasons is, Dragon’s Lair came out in 1983 on a 12 inch optical disc that was exclusively released in the arcade and later on Dragon’s Lair 2, Space Ace and others were Laserdisc based games. If Coleco would have went with the Laserdisc option, the existing Laserdisc games could have been easily reproduced in existing million dollar Laserdisc factories. It would have cost money to port games like Dragon’s Lair over to RCA’s Video Disc system that used a needle and groove like a record. The second mistake, is if Coleco would have been successful with the ADAM computer the RCA Video-disc system was a format that went out of production in 1986 since the Pioneer Laserdisc format won the format war for disc based movies. From 1978 to the year 2000 the Laserdisc format existed in North America. When the DVD format came out in 1997 the Laserdisc format died in the USA 3 years later around the year 2000, and Pioneer stopped making Laserdisc players in 2009.

 

It’s very hard to predict the future, however looking back at history, most the time Coleco was going the cheapest route when it came to new technologies. While it’s great to offer low cost videogame and computer products for the consumer, the problem is going the cheapest route sometimes results in quality control issues and tape, disk, and other media that will become obsolete in the near future.        

 

In the Arcade the Laserdisc games were always NTSC standard definition quality. Digital Leisure has performed a master scan of the original film source, and they have created a 1080P quality version of Dragon’s Lair, Dragon’s Lair II: Time Warp, and Space Ace on the Blu-ray format that is much better quality then the original arcade versions.  

 


Edited by HDTV1080P, Wed Sep 20, 2017 2:11 PM.


#38 mr_me OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Sep 22, 2017 5:57 AM

The coleco vision graphics chip has a unique feature of tranparent background pixels. When mixed with an external video source the coleco vision can have its graphics overlaying real video. If they had some sort of video disc expansion, unique games could have been created using real video as a background. I would have expected the interface to go through the regular expansion port.

Laserdisc would have been ridiculously expensive for 1984. Games like Dragon's Lair and Space Ace have limited gameplay and little replay value. Such an addon would have been an expensive gimmick. Going into the later 1980s and after the end of the arcade golden age, the coleco vision would need more original games rather than depending on arcade conversions. And the coleco vision was attracting third party developers creating original games like "Fortune Builder" and "Alcazar: The Forgotten Fortress".

#39 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:45 AM

The following is a link to pictures of what the Ultimate SD Wafer Drive looks like when inserted into a ColecoVision, Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer, and standalone ADAM computer.

 

http://atariage.com/forums/topic/269366-colecovisionadam-ultimate-sd-wafer-drive-up-to-32gb-of-storage-space/?p=3855371



#40 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Oct 11, 2017 10:57 PM

Here is pictures of the retail box for the ColecoVision power supply. The original ColecoVision came with this power supply but without the power supply retail box, this is just an exact replacement ColecoVision power supply one could order directly from Coleco or one could purchase it from a retail store if the retail store stocked it. The ColecoVision power supply would supply power for anything connected to the ColecoVision, except for the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer required more power then what the power supply could provide. When the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer was connected to the ColecoVision, the ColecoVision power supply was removed and the built in power supply in the ADAM printer was used to power everything including the original ColecoVision (The gray ADAM tray that the ColecoVision snaps into, covers the power jack for the ColecoVision to make it impossible to try and use two power supplies at the exact same time).   

Attached Thumbnails

  • ColecoVision power supply retail box.JPG
  • ColecoVision power supply retail box 2.JPG
  • ColecoVision power supply retail box 3.JPG
  • ColecoVision power supply 2.JPG
  • ColecoVision power supply.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P, Wed Oct 11, 2017 11:00 PM.


#41 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Jan 24, 2018 2:34 AM

Here is what pin 1, pin 2, and pin 3 from the ColecoVision power supply looks like when measured with a digital meter. Fluke meters are very reliable, I have had this Fluke meter since the 80’s, it never broke once even though it’s been beat up and dropped several times. Fluke meters can withstand a 200 feet drop when in the hard case and Fluke makes replacement parts if the LCD screen gets cracked, etc. Decades later in the 21st Century Fluke makes even better quality products with more features.   

Attached Thumbnails

  • Position of Pin one and voltage.JPG
  • Position of Pin two and voltage.JPG
  • Position of Pin three and voltage.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P, Wed Jan 24, 2018 2:44 AM.


#42 DrBoss302 OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 25, 2018 9:42 PM

 

I actually won a complete X-10 Package that was part of a large raffle of items at ADAMcon IV in Cleveland, OH. I never used it and eventually sold it thru the NIAD Newsletter's "For Sale" section.

 

I used it and it worked well back in the day. Still have it today.



#43 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat May 5, 2018 3:46 AM

While I liked the second run official Coleco Supergame Module brand that OPCODE original designed. The advantage of the fourth generation (4th run) OPCODE brand Super Game Module is that it works with the French SCART version of the ColecoVision. Also this new fourth generation OPCODE Super Game Module that was released in April of 2018 has a very nice fancy collectable retail package that is much better when compared to the second run Coleco version. The OPCODE owners manual and color catalog has a very professional look and feel to the paper quality. In addition, one does not need to mess around with new nameplates and the 4th generation SGM module itself has a nice clean look when viewed up close. OPCODE games keeps improving on the quality and delivery speed of their products.   

 

The following are some pictures I took of the fourth generation OPCODE Super Game Module that was released in April of 2018.   

Attached Thumbnails

  • Retail package front view.JPG
  • Retail package front view 2.JPG
  • Retail package backview.JPG
  • Retail package backview 2.JPG
  • Retail package side view.JPG
  • Retail package side view 2.JPG
  • Retail package side view 3.JPG
  • Retail package inside view one.JPG
  • Retail package inside view 2.JPG
  • Retail inside view 3.JPG
  • Retail package inside view 4.JPG
  • Retail inside view 5.JPG
  • Retail inside view 6.JPG
  • OPCODE Owners  manaul.JPG
  • OPCODE Catalog.JPG
  • SGM pic1.JPG
  • SGM pic2.JPG
  • SGM pic3.JPG
  • ColecoVision Front view.JPG
  • ColecoVision Front view 2.JPG
  • ColecoVision Front view 3.JPG
  • Expansion Module #3 ADAM Computer.JPG
  • Expansion Module #3 Adam Computer pic2.JPG
  • Expansion Module #3 ADAM Computer pic3.JPG
  • Standalone ADAM Computer.JPG
  • Standalone ADAM Computer pic2.JPG
  • Standalone ADAM Computer pic3.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P, Sat May 5, 2018 3:50 AM.


#44 NIAD OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat May 5, 2018 8:16 AM

It's not a FOURTH generation as if the SGM hardware has changed .. it's just the FOURTH production run with a change in the packaging and some other cosmetic changes mainly due to the whole Coleco fiasco that happened last year.

Correct me if I am wrong, but Opcode has to hand mod each individual SGM to be functional on the French Scart CV system so you still can't take the SGM you just received and use it on a Scart CV.

#45 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat May 5, 2018 3:56 PM

According to what I understand from the following website is that only the 3rd and 4th run work with the French SCART version of the ColecoVision. The hardware was changed in the 3rd run so that the French SCART is supported. The original first and second run that had the official Coleco logo is not supported for the French Scart versions of the ColecoVision. There have been 3 different nameplates and different styles of packaging. However, it appears that there might only be two different generations of the SGM. REV E Coleco brand for the first and second run, and REV F the OPCODE brand for the third and fourth run. Only the OPCODE brand works with the French SCART ColecoVision. The latest REV F of the SGM works with all ColecoVision systems.

Select quotes

 

 “In December 2016, an updated version of the SGM was launched, and this module became compatible with the French CBS Scart ColecoVision.”

 

“Works with all ColecoVisions, NTSC, PAL and the French Scart version.”

 

The French CBS SGM version is included from the latest (3rd) version from December 2016 and sold from January 2017.This version and the 4th version will works with all types of ColecoVisions, NTSC-PAL-SCART.”

Reference link to website quotes


Edited by HDTV1080P, Sat May 5, 2018 4:05 PM.


#46 NIAD OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat May 5, 2018 8:42 PM

I know Ollie's site well and would be cautious unless the news/info came directly from Opcode via his website, Facebook page, etc. because Ollie takes news announcements from numerous sites and then posts them on his site.. I hope it's correct because it means that Opcode no longer has to mod each SGM to work properly with the French Scart CV as he has had to do in the past. I think he caught up with those after the third run but would have to double check the Opcode sub-forum to be sure.


Edited by NIAD, Sat May 5, 2018 8:43 PM.


#47 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jul 12, 2018 11:01 PM

Back in the 80’s and early 90’s I thought about purchasing a eprom programmer to make backup copies of existing Coleco ADAM eprom’s, modify existing software code, and possible design new software to place on a eprom for the first time. However, over the decades I always put it off since I thought it might be a waste of money because of the high price of eprom programmers. Also one needed to own a IBM compatible computer to use a eprom programmer since as far as I am aware none directly connected to the Coleco ADAM computer. Since my only computer in the 80's and early 90's was a Coleco ADAM computer, a eprom programmer was not a option unless I was to purchase a new computer (Walters Software and Micro Innovations back in the 80's used a eprom programmer to create software for their own products and also some public domain software use). Around 10 years ago I did purchase a Ultraviolet Eprom eraser for over $100 after shipping, called the Eprom Eraser LER121A . However, I never got around to buying a working eprom programmer and my Eprom Eraser has been sitting in the retail box brand new for around 10 years unused (Did buy a defective eprom programmer around 10 years ago and ended up returning it for a refund, and never tried another one until June of 2018).

 

High-end universal eprom programmers can cost over $2,000+ after shipping (Like the Conitec Galep-5D-240). However the Batronix BX48 Batego II is the best value eprom programmer for the amount of chips it supports. These Batronix BX48 Batego II programmers were selling for around $866.83 from an EBAY dealer. However, on Batronix website after shipping the Batronix BX48 Batego II programmer costs around $526.62. The cheapest factory new in the retail box price I found online for the Batronix BX48 Batego II programmer after shipping cost was $401.72 from Newark website (I might have had some type of coupon but back in June of 2018. I ended up getting the programmer for $355.87 plus $20 freight to the USA and $25.85 in import taxes. Worked out to be exactly $401.72). That is at least $124.90-$200+ savings compared to most other online dealers. And a $465.11 savings compared to what a EBAY dealer was selling it for.

 

After installing all the software updates and firmware updates the Batronix BX48 Batego II is an amazing product that is very easy to use. Many of the functions are automatic with a manual override option.  The software is very easy to use and comes with a nice Hex Editor. Well worth the $401.72 price I paid. The programmer is powered by the USB connection and works great with a Windows 64 bit operating system (All 32 bit and 64 bit Windows, Linux, and MAC operating systems are supported).    

 

I have so many projects going on at once (multitasking with ADAM projects and other projects) that I am afraid I might not have time to use this programmer. I hope that in the coming weeks or months I well make some time to use this programmer for some classic public domain 80's and 90's software for use with the Coleco ADAM computer.     

Attached Thumbnails

  • BX48 BATEGO II.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P, Thu Jul 12, 2018 11:40 PM.


#48 Ikrananka OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Jul 13, 2018 2:29 PM

Are there any chips on the ADAM motherboard that are greater than 40 pin?

 

Personally, I use a MCUmall Electronics GQ-4X programmer which can be had for less than $125.  It only supports up to 40 pin, but as I say it has met all of my ColecoVision and pinball machine needs to date.  Simple to use and highly recommended.


Edited by Ikrananka, Fri Jul 13, 2018 2:29 PM.


#49 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Jul 14, 2018 7:05 AM

Thanks for the information. At $125 that programmer is more than 4 times cheaper when compared to purchasing the Batronix BX48 Batego II directly from Batronix website. In addition, if it works fine and does everything you want that is great. I know the Batronix 48 pin programmer does a lot more then I currently need, however around 10 years ago I had to return a programmer I purchased for around $150 since it was defective and did not work. Therefore I decided to go with the Batronix BX48 Batego II which well also supports PLD, SPLD, EPLD, GAL, NAND flash, etc. There is a possibility that I might use the programmer for more modern devices beyond the ADAM computer one day.  


Edited by HDTV1080P, Sat Jul 14, 2018 7:32 AM.


#50 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Jul 27, 2018 3:46 PM

The 1983 Coleco ADAM computer is an amazing high-end computer when compared to other computers between 1979 to 1985. For example unique to the Coleco ADAM computer was the Digital Data Drive which was an automatic high speed tape drive that stored 256K of data. Coleco’s automatic high speed tape drive was faster and much easier to use when compared to manual tape drives that the TI-99/4a, ATARI computers, and Commodore computers offered. While I prefer the actual Coleco Disk Drive or Micro Innovations Disk Drive instead of a Coleco Digital Data Drive, I would want a Digital Data Drive over any manual slow tape drive.     

 

The keyboard built into the memory console on most 70’s and 80’s computers was a bad feature. There are some TI-99/4a computers that are still new in the box and some people in 2018 are discovering that some T1-99/4a computers have a generation of defective mylar keyboards that are bad. The problem with the TI-99/4a and most computers from the 80’s is that one cannot replace the keyboard without taking the computer apart. The reason is ATARI, Commodore, and TI-99/4A, and many others built the keyboard inside the memory console inside of separating it from the memory console. Even the Commodore 128 computer has the keyboard built into the memory console. The Commodore 128 has a slower Z80 2Mhz CPU when compared to the ADAM’s 3.58Mhz Z80 processor. However, the Commodore 128 has 80 column color and built in 128K of memory that is better than ADAM’s video output. The Commodore Amiga in July 1985 was the first Commodore computer that was more powerful than the 1983 Coleco ADAM with Amiga's 7Mhz and higher CPU. However, even the top of the line Amiga computers had the keyboard built into the memory console.

 

Another unique nice feature on the Coleco ADAM computer is the separate components when it comes to a dedicated keyboard being separated from the memory console. This is a concept used by all modern desktop computers running the Windows operating system. They use either a PS/2 or USB keyboard. Coleco’s 6 pin ADAMNet keyboard that connected to the ADAM memory console was a very smart and state of the art concept for a 1983 computer. If the keyboard became defective one just purchased a replacement keyboard directly from Coleco instead of having to buy a new computer or send the computer in to get serviced. At one time one could get complete replacement Coleco ADAM keyboards including outside shell for around $20 and even Radio Shack sold for around $5.99 internal ADAM keyboards for those that wanted to take their ADAM keyboard shell apart and pop in a new keyboard. Of course now used ADAM keyboards in 2018 are rare and sometimes used ones sale for around $90+. Another unique feature on the ADAM keyboard was the Smartkeys that are comparable to the function keys on a modern Windows keyboard. In addition, the Coleco ADAM computer had its own keypad since the Coleco controller attached to the side of the keyboard and acted like a modern keypad found on today’s Windows keyboards.

 

In 1983 the Digital Data Drive and the ADAM Keyboard was state of the art compared to what other home computers were offering at the time. Most computers came with a built in Basic programming language. It was a smart decision for Coleco instead to make the Smartwriter word processor instantly loading on power on since it was built in. All Coleco ADAM’s purchased in retail stores also came with 3 Digital Data Packs. SmartBasic, Buck Rodgers, and a blank DDP were always included in every ADAM system. The Coleco ADAM daisy wheel letter quality printer had excellent print quality, however the printer noise level is one thing that hurt the ADAM’s reputation. Back in late 1983 the complete ADAM system cost around $800 and then the Expansion module #3 version for the ColecoVision cost around $600. For under $1,000 the ADAM was a bargain for everything that was bundled with it. However when compared to TI-99/4a, ATARI, and Commodore computers they were more attractive since they were cheaper computers. Perhaps if Coleco would have released the ADAM computer without the printer at a cheaper price it might have been more successful. In addition, if the printer would not have been included maybe instead of Smartwriter word processing being built in, instead the SmartBasic program might have been built in. To this day I do prefer the Smartwriter word processor being built in. Since in the 80’s I used the Smartwriter word processor more than I did SmartBasic. And that was true for many families that owned the Coleco ADAM computer.         

 

It would be nice someday if a ADAMNET to 4 port USB hub interface would be created. Then one could plug in a USB keyboard, 1.44MB 3.5 inch floppy drive, USB solid state drive, USB hard drive, and USB printer.

Attached Thumbnails

  • ADAM keybaord.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Jul 27, 2018 4:05 PM.





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