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Soldering Iron Recommendations


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#76 Osgeld OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:32 PM

nope dont, its unregulated it will burn the traces off a 130xe (eventually of you are not monitoring how hot its getting, which you wont being a noob)

 

it took me what like 2 hours of going slow with a iron and a spring loaded sucker to remove 140 pins worth of chips ... and there was plenty of football and smoke breaks during that 

 

http://atariage.com/...e-chip-removal/


Edited by Osgeld, Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:35 PM.


#77 -^CrožBow^- OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:24 PM

Yeap for all my desoldering work these days I just use my Hakko FR300 but again, they ain't cheap and it was a father's day present about 2 years back. But I love that thing! I usually keep the knob on the bottom of my fr300 at the 1.5 - 2 mark for most projects. As for my Hakko 936, I keep that at about 650 - 700 for most of my work. I used to only use about 350 but it just took so long to get the solder to wet and like many have said....better to get it on there with higher temp for less time than lower temp for longer time. Or something like that...



#78 RodLightning OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:30 PM

nope dont, its unregulated it will burn the traces off a 130xe (eventually of you are not monitoring how hot its getting, which you wont being a noob)
 
it took me what like 2 hours of going slow with a iron and a spring loaded sucker to remove 140 pins worth of chips ... and there was plenty of football and smoke breaks during that 
 
http://atariage.com/...e-chip-removal/


I've actually been bodging along for many years using various inexpensive irons. My favorite is an old 25w pencil from radio shack. I have the radio shack rubber bulb desoldering iron previously mentioned, but never liked it much.
This video shows the cheap chinese piston tool in use. I'm skeptical about buying or using one, but it looks interesting to see him tear it down and then work with it.
I don't do enough PCB work to justify shelling out for a Hakko FR300. I am looking more seriously at the spring loaded tools. I agree that working slowly is the best approach, especially on the damned XEs.



#79 wood_jl OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 12, 2017 7:58 AM

Yeap for all my desoldering work these days I just use my Hakko FR300 but again, they ain't cheap....

 

No, they are not.  But I just ordered one.  After your post, I read reviews and I think it is important for newbies to have good tools.  This, of course, better not come with any degree of overconfidence, but my desoldering tool (cheap Ebay a few years ago)......

 

2010_03_21 Desoldering Iron.JPG

 

....was a learning tool to butcher old boards with, but it got so hot it was kind of concerning.  I'd have to let it cool periodically.  It worked better than nothing, but it's hard to desolder chips super-cleanly so that little shards of remnant solder won't tear the trace on a 130XE fragile motherboard, for instance.  At least that what it seems like to this newbie.  Of course, I have little intention of any serious jobs, but I regret not learning (meaning a modicum of basics; couldn't possibly master)  this skill, as I'm sure many others do too.

 

The Youtube videos seem helpful, or at least so it would seem.



#80 -^CrožBow^- OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 12, 2017 8:18 AM

 

No, they are not.  But I just ordered one.  After your post, I read reviews and I think it is important for newbies to have good tools.  This, of course, better not come with any degree of overconfidence, but my desoldering tool (cheap Ebay a few years ago)......

 

 

I used an old Weller 40watt station for about 10 years and a standard solder sucker to go with it until I could afford some serious stuff. I do think using the cheaper stuff but decent is an excellent way to learn the trade and in my case, learning to solder and de-solder by first starting with old monitor chassis boards was an excellent way. Lots of room to move about, large traces (Due to the high amounts of current used), and nice large components. Made it really easy to learn to handle the iron at the right angles for the task at hand. I'm largely self taught on my solder work, but my father was pretty good at it and it seems to run in the genes it would seem. Once you have the confidence, though it becomes like night and day when you get good quality tools to start working on this stuff.

 

I also recommend a set of these as I have ended up using them far more often than I ever though I would:

 

https://www.amazon.c...er tool aid kit

 

I got my set for about this price from a Microcenter I was passing by on my way home a few years back. The most used tools for me have been the small and large boring tool, the copper brush tool and cutting edge, and the tool with the slotted end and open fork ends. That last tool is the best thing ever for two very common tasks for me. The slotted cylinder end is great for the twist metal tabs on Atari RF shields and the open ended fork like tool is great for checking if IC pins are loose when de-soldering by gently pushing it against them to see if there is free motion. Some of the best $10 spent even if they are cheap...



#81 Osgeld OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 12, 2017 8:33 AM

 

....was a learning tool to butcher old boards with, but it got so hot it was kind of concerning.  I'd have to let it cool periodically.  It worked better than nothing, but it's hard to desolder chips super-cleanly so that little shards of remnant solder won't tear the trace on a 130XE fragile motherboard, for instance.  At least that what it seems like to this newbie. 

 

in my blog post about it at the top of the page, I mention using my hot air station to get around that, which is a cheap no name 35$ ebay job, though honestly it gets used much more for hot glue and heat shrink than actual soldering (unless I start a big smt project, few parts ill just hit with the iron but lots of parts or lots of pins its handy, though that is OT) 



#82 AtariLeaf OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 12, 2017 3:51 PM

 

I used an old Weller 40watt station for about 10 years and a standard solder sucker to go with it until I could afford some serious stuff. I do think using the cheaper stuff but decent is an excellent way to learn the trade and in my case, learning to solder and de-solder by first starting with old monitor chassis boards was an excellent way. Lots of room to move about, large traces (Due to the high amounts of current used), and nice large components. Made it really easy to learn to handle the iron at the right angles for the task at hand. I'm largely self taught on my solder work, but my father was pretty good at it and it seems to run in the genes it would seem. Once you have the confidence, though it becomes like night and day when you get good quality tools to start working on this stuff.

 

I also recommend a set of these as I have ended up using them far more often than I ever though I would:

 

https://www.amazon.c...er tool aid kit

 

I got my set for about this price from a Microcenter I was passing by on my way home a few years back. The most used tools for me have been the small and large boring tool, the copper brush tool and cutting edge, and the tool with the slotted end and open fork ends. That last tool is the best thing ever for two very common tasks for me. The slotted cylinder end is great for the twist metal tabs on Atari RF shields and the open ended fork like tool is great for checking if IC pins are loose when de-soldering by gently pushing it against them to see if there is free motion. Some of the best $10 spent even if they are cheap...

 

A local store has something similar. For ten bucks you recommend it eh?

 

https://www.princess...set/A-p8502635e



#83 -^CrožBow^- OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 12, 2017 3:59 PM

Yes. My only issue with that set, is that the pic they list shows some pretty skimpy looking copper and alum brushes there as opposed to the ones I have. But the cutting blade/scraping blade is nice as I've used it to get rid of solder mask on traces to create new attach points for solder to adhere to when the original pads have broken or been damaged in some way. The brushs are nice to get help remove nearly invisible solder blobs that splash onto the board when you solder and also useful for creating scratches on again, exposed trace to help use as new anchors for soldering things to. 

 

I pretty much always have mine at the ready as I've ended up using one or more tools from the set for nearly every project I work on now it seems.

 

Also get some good precision tweezers! helps with holding onto smaller wire without burning your fingers and stuff.



#84 AtariLeaf OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 12, 2017 4:07 PM

 

 

Also get some good precision tweezers! helps with holding onto smaller wire without burning your fingers and stuff.

 

They have those too. I was already considering these because that desolder braid gets hot to hold for any length of time. They say they're heat resistant too

 

https://www.princess...ers/A-p2920064e



#85 -^CrožBow^- OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 12, 2017 4:58 PM

 

They have those too. I was already considering these because that desolder braid gets hot to hold for any length of time. They say they're heat resistant too

 

https://www.princess...ers/A-p2920064e

 

Not a fan of that style. I have one of those and never use it. My problem with that type is that they work the opposite of how you expect them to. You pinch the center and it opens instead of closes. I prefer using basically some standard type tweezers like this:

 

http://shop.excelbla...-tweezers-black

 

And while they may not have any heat protective coating on them, they don't really get that hot because the actual tips on them are so fine there isn't much surface area actually making contact with the wire. Thus heat doesn't really travel that well through them when using them.



#86 wood_jl OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 12, 2017 5:14 PM

I also recommend a set of these as I have ended up using them far more often than I ever though I would:

 

https://www.amazon.c...er tool aid kit

 

 

Since I'm burning up the credit line, I added that to my cart.  Thanks!

 

 

in my blog post about it at the top of the page, I mention using my hot air station to get around that, which is a cheap no name 35$ ebay job, though honestly it gets used much more for hot glue and heat shrink than actual soldering (unless I start a big smt project, few parts ill just hit with the iron but lots of parts or lots of pins its handy, though that is OT) 

 

I need to read your posts more clearly.  Now I want one of those $35 jobs, anyway.  This overpriced thingy better #$&?@ work!!!!



#87 CPUWIZ OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 12, 2017 9:35 PM

https://hackaday.com...bout-soldering/



#88 RodLightning OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:36 PM

 

Good stuff...reminds me that I learn or re-learn a little bit every time I pick up a soldering iron.  I probably need to shop for better equipment than what I have been using.



#89 AtariLeaf OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Sep 13, 2017 3:53 AM

I bookmarked the video. It's almost an hour long so will have to watch later. Thanks CPUWIZ. 



#90 DrVenkman OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Sep 13, 2017 10:47 AM

Great video to share, CPUWiz, thanks.

#91 AtariLeaf OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Sep 14, 2017 3:12 PM

This baby showed up at my doorstep this morning :D

I'll try it out this weekend and hopefully finish the switch repair on my one XEGS. Any last minute tips, tricks, suggestions, advice, etc on using this station please have at it. :)

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • hakko box.jpg


#92 Osgeld OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Sep 14, 2017 3:19 PM

never saw one in the retail box  (last time I got some was for the lab and got the bulk pack lol)



#93 -^CrožBow^- OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Sep 15, 2017 7:43 AM

This baby showed up at my doorstep this morning :D

I'll try it out this weekend and hopefully finish the switch repair on my one XEGS. Any last minute tips, tricks, suggestions, advice, etc on using this station please have at it. :)

 

 

I know this is an excellent iron, but I'm sooo not a fan of the new color scheme. I'm so glad I grabbed my 936 while they were still available! So regarding the box marketing, I disagree about it being 'Stylish'...LOL. Is anyone a fan of the purple/blue/yellow scheme of Hakko's stuff? I know my FR300 is using the Blue/Yellow scheme but I do rather it didn't. LOL



#94 DrVenkman OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Sep 15, 2017 11:08 AM

I like it. :) ba1f57584e8b65feff3003575c883970.jpg

#95 Swami ONLINE  

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Posted Fri Sep 15, 2017 1:21 PM

What do you think of this one that uses Hakko 900 tips. Digital, close temp accuracy, inexpensive, looks like a large number of good reviews. Although a lot of these amazon companies may not exist in a year.

 

https://www.amazon.c...d=22ATZ0Z2ATW48

 

X-Tronic Model #3020-XTS Digital Display Soldering Iron Station



#96 wood_jl OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Sep 15, 2017 3:01 PM



Hakko FR300 arrived today. It just got here this afternoon, and I haven't tried it out yet.

What a chunk of money!!! However, I think that for delicate desolder operations, I'll be satisfied if it works well. Reviews are very good. Perhaps a waste of money for someone with better skills, who could get by with cheaper equipment.

But I have to say upon initial inspection: I love that [apparent] Japanese quality!! I think Hakko will be my next purchase for a soldering station (that I (again) won't know how to use, but will learn).

#97 -^CrožBow^- OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Sep 15, 2017 3:19 PM

On the FR300 I use it for all desoldering not just ICs. Makes cap replacements much easier. Also I've yet to need to use the setting above 2 on the dial on the bottom of the handle for that. I do advise you get more tips with different diameters to accommodate different tasks. Like a large opening tip to help with solder removal on RF modulators..etc.

 

And be careful to try and NOT let the tip of the desoldering iron actually touch the pads the components attached to. It is hot enough to melt them up with the rest of the solder!

 

So just do like the instructions tell you on using it...place it over and against the side of the pins or leads you need to desolder and when the solder wets...start wiggling back and forth with it while you trigger the pump. You will wonder why you didn't save up for one earlier!!! LOL


Edited by -^CrožBow^-, Fri Sep 15, 2017 3:20 PM.


#98 RodLightning OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Sep 16, 2017 6:31 AM

What do you think of this one that uses Hakko 900 tips. Digital, close temp accuracy, inexpensive, looks like a large number of good reviews. Although a lot of these amazon companies may not exist in a year.

 

https://www.amazon.c...d=22ATZ0Z2ATW48

 

X-Tronic Model #3020-XTS Digital Display Soldering Iron Station

 

The specs on it look good and manufacturer participates on the Q&A, good sign.  I'm wondering if the plug-in iron is also Hakko pin compatible.   The older style appeals to me for some reason.  It appears to be sold on ebay also.

 

Really liking this thread...here's another Hakko wannabe I came across, the X-Tronic looks like it may be a bit better though.

 

YiHUA 937D+ (I'm pronouncing it Yeee Hooraah)

https://www.amazon.c...x_0CrVzb2X7072D



#99 AtariLeaf OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Sep 16, 2017 9:07 AM

SUCCESS! After practicing on old equipment I was finally able to replace the two dead switches (Start and Select) on my XEGS with the replacement switches from Best Electronics. The 888 seems to work great and I'm very happy with it. Thanks to everyone for their help here. Really appreciate it. :)






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