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How I almost used an Atari 8-bit for school


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#26 Lord Thag OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:26 PM

 

Fuck'n teachers I tell you! They wouldn't accept good 1/216th advanced dot-matrix. And when I asked WHY they couldn't or wouldn't tell me. It wouldn't be so bad if there was a legitimate reason for not accepting them, but there wasn't. At least none that I understood. Other than to maybe sadistically make the students hunch over and write write write like a punishment. Well fuck'em'all. I still can't do cursive nicely. It was kinda like tryn'a make a Yugo win the Daytona, never going to happen, but go through the motions just to go through the motions.

 

One teacha told me it was hard to read. And I said like bullshit it is and started reading my paper. And I got sent to the office for detention for a day for mouthing back. The school I went to was so anti-tech and backwards. I hated it and couldn't wait till I got out of there.

 

Yeah, mine were too. One of the things I am kinda proud of was telling off a teacher and saying that cursive was going the way of the dinosaurs. Never bothered learning it. She got all high and mighty and said it was a required skill to be an adult. I said using a computer was.

 

Guess who ended up being a successful adult due to ignoring cursive and focusing on computer skills?  :P

 

Take that, you mean old battleaxe.  :-D



#27 boxpressed OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 5:18 PM

Wordstar 3.3 and Epson LQ dot matrix for me in high school.

Also, the daisy wheel printer was the luxury no one I knew owned.

#28 Osgeld OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 5:39 PM

I started off using pfs write or if I had to work on something like when they give you homework over summer break and I was stuck with my mom, wordstar, and yes I never bothered to learn cursive beyond the point of the class exercise

 

I migrated to appleworks cause we had it (as well as PFS write) and it was easier to deal with writing papers outside of book reports with its office suite 

 

NO COMPUTER PRINTOUTS i want you to hand scrawl a bunch of incomprehensible loop de loops that everyone does differently and give you a bad grade cause I cant read YOURS ... I also argued with math teachers constantly "cause I didnt show my work" like seriously X + 1 = 3 solve for X, what do you think I am? Shit my pants tying my shoes retarded, that I cant figure that out without writing a thesis?


Edited by Osgeld, Sun Sep 17, 2017 5:41 PM.


#29 mytekcontrols OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 5:56 PM

 

Fuck'n teachers I tell you! They wouldn't accept good 1/216th advanced dot-matrix. And when I asked WHY they couldn't or wouldn't tell me. It wouldn't be so bad if there was a legitimate reason for not accepting them, but there wasn't. At least none that I understood. Other than to maybe sadistically make the students hunch over and write write write like a punishment. Well fuck'em'all. I still can't do cursive nicely. It was kinda like tryn'a make a Yugo win the Daytona, never going to happen, but go through the motions just to go through the motions.

 

One teacha told me it was hard to read. And I said like bullshit it is and started reading my paper. And I got sent to the office for detention for a day for mouthing back. The school I went to was so anti-tech and backwards. I hated it and couldn't wait till I got out of there.

 

 

 

Yeah, mine were too. One of the things I am kinda proud of was telling off a teacher and saying that cursive was going the way of the dinosaurs. Never bothered learning it. She got all high and mighty and said it was a required skill to be an adult. I said using a computer was.

 

Guess who ended up being a successful adult due to ignoring cursive and focusing on computer skills?  :P

 

Take that, you mean old battleaxe.  :-D

 

Reminds me of something that happened  back in 7th grade history when we had a substitute for about a week (the original history teacher was out for some reason). Anyway a student in the class (Malcolm) questioned one of the supposed facts that the substitute teacher was presenting, at which point the sub told Malcolm to not question him. Of course Malcolm continued to stick to his argument, and then the sub said for disrupting my class you will write 100 times that "I shouldn't talk back in class". This did not stop Malcolm, and he continued to disagree, at which point the assignment became 200, then 300... you get the point. Then something inside me snapped and I yelled "That isn't fair!!!" So... I too got the same assignment. Next day Malcolm and I showed up to class and hadn't written a single sentence. The sub sent us to the Principles office. Now keep in mind that the thing that Malcolm had disagreed with was indeed not correct, meaning that the sub was teaching us a falsehood and standing by it as if it were the truth. So we're both in the Principle's office, we tell him our story, and the Principle calmly says that unfortunately it doesn't matter, and that we still need to write the assignment or else we will be expelled from school.

 

Yes Malcolm and I finally gave in and did what we were told. After all we were only 13 years old, didn't want our parents to find out, and felt too small to continue the fight on our own. We also learned a valuable life lesson that day, that life isn't always fair. And yes sometimes teachers suck  ;) . I also subsequently figured out what the saying "power corrupts" really meant, and later still the term "plausible deniability".

 

EDIT: I just want to add that I also had some outstanding teachers that went the extra mile to help me. 

 

- Michael


Edited by mytekcontrols, Sun Sep 17, 2017 6:01 PM.


#30 Stephen ONLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 6:02 PM

 

 

 

Reminds me of something that happened  back in 7th grade history when we had a substitute for about a week (the original history teacher was out for some reason). Anyway a student in the class (Malcolm) questioned one of the supposed facts that the substitute teacher was presenting, at which point the sub told Malcolm to not question him. Of course Malcolm continued to stick to his argument, and then the sub said for disrupting my class you will write 100 times that "I shouldn't talk back in class". This did not stop Malcolm, and he continued to disagree, at which point the assignment became 200, then 300... you get the point. Then something inside me snapped and I yelled "That isn't fair!!!" So... I too got the same assignment. Next day Malcolm and I showed up to class and hadn't written a single sentence. The sub sent us to the Principles office. Now keep in mind that the thing that Malcolm had disagreed with was indeed not correct, meaning that the sub was teaching us a falsehood and standing by it as if it were the truth. So we're both in the Principle's office, we tell him our story, and the Principle calmly says that unfortunately it doesn't matter, and that we still need to write the assignment or else we will be expelled from school.

 

Yes Malcolm and I finally gave in and did what we were told. After all we were only 13 years old, didn't want our parents to find out, and felt too small to continue the fight on our own. We also learned a valuable life lesson that day, that life isn't always fair. And yes sometimes teachers suck  ;) . I also subsequently figured out what the saying "power corrupts" really meant, and later still the term "plausible deniability".

 

EDIT: I just want to add that I also had some outstanding teachers that went the extra mile to help me. 

 

- Michael

I was hoping you were going to tell us that you turned in a printed assignment of the sentences :)



#31 mytekcontrols OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 6:05 PM

I was hoping you were going to tell us that you turned in a printed assignment of the sentences :)

 

I wish  :D  But there were no personal computers when I was 13 (and wouldn't be for another decade). However that would have made for an even better story by far  :) .

 

- Michael



#32 Keatah ONLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:25 PM

10 For A = 1 to 100

20 Print "I shouldn't talk back in class."

30 Next A

40 End



#33 Osgeld OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 8:54 PM

10 For A = 1 to 100

20 Print "I shouldn't talk back in class."

30 Next A

40 End

 

and set the output to the printer



#34 megarat OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Sep 17, 2017 10:26 PM

It sounds like I'm pretty lucky, as back in high school (class of '88), I was able to use my Atari 1200XL with a 1025 printer with no problems.  I wrote many a report on that thing, and AtariWriter was a good friend of mine.

 

One related memory comes to mind, which was in my Algebra II class, when we were learning matrix multiplication.  We were given this hideous assignment to do something like 20 matrix multiplication problems, all by hand, and to show all of our work.  As many of you probably know, the process of matrix multiplication is relatively simple, but it's tedious to do by hand -- basically mathematical gruntwork, with little multiplication problems repeated over and over again, where if you make one mistake, your result turns out wrong.

 

So I asked my teacher if I could write a program to do it, and glory be, he said that as long as I turned in the source code with my answers, it would be fine. 

 

I gleefully spent that evening writing up a deeply for-looped BASIC program that performed matrix multiplication.  This program then did my homework for me in about ten minutes, with almost all of that time required for entering and double-checking the matrices that were to be multiplied.  I'm not sure if I saved any time overall, but it was a lot more fun than iteratively grunting through the operations by hand, and I was rewarded with the feeling of being ingenious and innovative.

 

Fast forward to today, where I basically make a living doing the same thing:  coding up mathematical (well, statistical and machine learning) methods for data analysis.  So perhaps that was a formative learning experience for me.


Edited by megarat, Sun Sep 17, 2017 10:33 PM.


#35 Ely OFFLINE  

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Posted Yesterday, 3:19 AM

@myteckcontrols/Mtchael Good story, pity about the ending. Kids should be taught to question things, how else does the world progress. What was the false thing the teacher was telling you btw and what country was this in?

#36 Brentarian ONLINE  

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Posted Yesterday, 5:59 AM

One more high school memory... I didn't have an Apple at home, so in my computer science class I would code at home on my Atari with Kyan Pascal, print the code, then at school re-enter it with a few changes into Instant and Apple Pascal. We were allowed to play games in class if our work was complete. For a two week project I would hurry and get it done in a few days, then play a disk full of AtariSoft games for a week and a half in that class (on a green monochrome monitor).

#37 mytekcontrols OFFLINE  

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Posted Yesterday, 11:03 PM

@myteckcontrols/Mtchael Good story, pity about the ending. Kids should be taught to question things, how else does the world progress. What was the false thing the teacher was telling you btw and what country was this in?

 

It's been way too long ago to remember. This occurred on the west coast of the United States (state of California) in a town called Petaluma.

 

- Michael



#38 Ely OFFLINE  

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Posted Today, 1:21 AM

Ah Petaluma, the only reason I've heard it is because that's where Leo Laporte runs his Netcasting business https://twit.tvfrom.

#39 zzip OFFLINE  

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Posted Today, 7:53 AM

Small nostalgia post.

 

In 4th Grade (~ 1985?), I got in serious trouble with a teacher one time for typing up a few small papers that we were asked to "write".  Of course, the teacher was focused on making sure I knew how to do cursive properly, and as a kid who knew everything I thought (and told her) that writing was "primitive", and asked why I can't just use my Atari to do papers.

 

She took my Atariwriter written and (Some kind of Epson dot matrix) printed papers and threw them in the trash and got very red in the face with me :).

 

So as it took several more years before schools became accepting of computer technology,  my Atari 8-bit never quite got used as part of my academic career..   But I really did love using AtariWriter..

 

P.S.  I haven't used Cursive..  in well over 20 years, but I sure love my Atari.  

 

they don't even teach kids cursive today, so you were just ahead of your time



#40 zzip OFFLINE  

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Posted Today, 7:54 AM

I use cursive every time I sign my name but YMMV

 

I used to, but now I kinda just scribble something that resembles my signature :)



#41 baktra ONLINE  

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Posted Today, 11:26 AM

One day, our Czech language teacher asked us to start bringing not only a hard copy of some of our homework to school, but also its machine readable form. It was in 1999, so it was typically a floppy disk. The teacher borrowed the disk, copied the file and returned the disk the day after.

 

Fortunately for the teacher, I had a PC since 1997. If she had decided only two years earlier, I am not sure what she would have to say about a text written in the Čapek editor (a clone of Speedscript) stored on a compact cassette.


Edited by baktra, Today, 11:28 AM.





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