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Why is the importance of ColecoVision almost never brought up historically?


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#251 Geoff Oltmans OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Nov 1, 2017 9:40 PM

No. Only the Add-a-Halt (game pause device), E.M. #1 and E.M. #3 were released for the CV and numerous 3rd Party hardware items were released for the ADAM that use the Expansion Port.

You might be thinking of the Practical Peripherals Super Sketch, which plugs into the cartridge port.


I don't think that was it. I was vaguely remembering some details about a expansion port game that used it to support saving high scores or something, but I may be getting my consoles mixed up, or I'm just completely off base. :)

#252 Bill Loguidice OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Nov 2, 2017 8:47 AM

I don't think that was it. I was vaguely remembering some details about a expansion port game that used it to support saving high scores or something, but I may be getting my consoles mixed up, or I'm just completely off base. :)

 

Probably completely off base. That would have probably gotten a lot of attention by now if something like that were ever created, even as a one-off!



#253 Q*bertkid OFFLINE  

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Posted Yesterday, 6:50 AM

I think the biggest thing that the Colecovision did was change the consumer, It made you expect more and if a game wasn't almost arcade perfect it sucked after this point in time and I agree that too appreciate the Colecovision's significance you really had to be there. I remember right after I got my Colecovision (Oct 82) I went to a birthday party and my friend got an intellivison and everybody was playing it except me and I remember my friends mom asking me if I liked video games and I said yes and she asked why I wasn't playing it and being an 8 year old kid I told her that thing sucks compared to a Colecovision. So when she took me home her and Kenny and his younger brother Billy went inside and she wanted to see this "Colecovision" well she must have really loved Donkey Kong because the next time I went over there the intellijunk was gone and they had a Colecovision (Your Welcome Kenny Singleton). And I remember every time people that came over who had never played it couldn't put the controller down and had these huge smiles on their faces because all they knew was the 2600 and it really made it that much more fun to play. It was like going from a black and white T.V. to color T.V.


Edited by Q*bertkid, Yesterday, 6:51 AM.


#254 Flojomojo OFFLINE  

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Posted Yesterday, 9:22 AM

ColecoVision was next in line, but it's not as if someone else wouldn't have thought of arcade ports with high resolution graphics and better system specs. 

 

If it were truly revolutionary, it would have ushered in more genres and gameplay styles. For example, the Intellivision had a bunch of strategic games, slower and deeper than the average arcade port. ColecoVision got a few of those, but it's not known for that. 



#255 Bill Loguidice OFFLINE  

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Posted Yesterday, 9:31 AM

ColecoVision was next in line, but it's not as if someone else wouldn't have thought of arcade ports with high resolution graphics and better system specs. 

 

If it were truly revolutionary, it would have ushered in more genres and gameplay styles. For example, the Intellivision had a bunch of strategic games, slower and deeper than the average arcade port. ColecoVision got a few of those, but it's not known for that. 

 

While I agree with the general premise, I think if we look towards the end of the ColecoVision's commercial lifespan, we can start to see envelopes being pushed. Besides all the educational stuff, there were hard-to-classify games like Campaign '84, War Room, It's Only Rock 'n' Roll, etc., not to mention unreleased games like RPG Lord of the Dungeon, which would have been the first console game with a battery backup. I think had circumstances been different and the ColecoVision survived through the Crash - for instance, Coleco not going down the Adam rabbit hole or going all-in on the Cabbage Patch thing - we could have gotten some really interesting stuff in the 85 - 86 timeframes. Of course, that premise would also have to assume that many of the third parties developing these games wouldn't have also gone down in flames, etc.



#256 JaguarVision OFFLINE  

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Posted Yesterday, 12:50 PM

ColecoVision was next in line, but it's not as if someone else wouldn't have thought of arcade ports with high resolution graphics and better system specs. 

 

If it were truly revolutionary, it would have ushered in more genres and gameplay styles. For example, the Intellivision had a bunch of strategic games, slower and deeper than the average arcade port. ColecoVision got a few of those, but it's not known for that. 

It literally got all the newerr styles that were in the arcades what?

 

It's the PC/Computerdominant genres they were missing. Even then we got games like Alcazar.

 

 

 

While I agree with the general premise, I think if we look towards the end of the ColecoVision's commercial lifespan, we can start to see envelopes being pushed. Besides all the educational stuff, there were hard-to-classify games like Campaign '84, War Room, It's Only Rock 'n' Roll, etc., not to mention unreleased games like RPG Lord of the Dungeon, which would have been the first console game with a battery backup. I think had circumstances been different and the ColecoVision survived through the Crash - for instance, Coleco not going down the Adam rabbit hole or going all-in on the Cabbage Patch thing - we could have gotten some really interesting stuff in the 85 - 86 timeframes. Of course, that premise would also have to assume that many of the third parties developing these games wouldn't have also gone down in flames, etc.

 

Coleco did survive through the crash. it was primarily Adamn failing that made the,m choose between electronics and CPK.






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