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Why is the importance of ColecoVision almost never brought up historically?


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#301 zzip OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Dec 7, 2017 2:32 PM

Most histories I've read mention the ColecoVision; that it was a powerful system that blew its contemporaries out of the water; that its life was cut short by the crash. I'm not sure what else you could say about it.
 
I suppose the OP meant "Why doesn't the ColecoVision get the attention of the 2600 and the NES?"


I said before, but so many videogame histories tend to skim over everything pre-NES, except maybe to mention how "ET destroyed the industry". The whole era doesn't get enough credit.

#302 Bill Loguidice OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Dec 7, 2017 3:00 PM

My own personal experience regarding the importance of the Adam historically, is that it had almost no impact at all. It got almost no magazine and 3rd parties support compared to its contemporaries for example. And no one tried to compete with it, at least not to the extent of the Apple II/C64/Atari feud. It was also, for me, an ill conceived machine with its dependency on its printer for power and tape drive that could be erased by turning the machine off with a tape in it.

 

It was just another z80 based computer lost in the sea of 6502 based home computers in its market. It may have had a better chance if it had launched and concentrated on the european/asian home market where the z80 was popular and many were developing on it. 

 

It was literally on the market for just a little over a year. Considering how vanishingly short that was, it got quite a bit of support and coverage. 

 

Besides the low end elephant in the room, the C-64, which sucked the life out of all comers in that space, Coleco obviously botched the Adam's launch both with fluctuating prices and their lack of quality control. They really bit off more than they could handle. With that said, it's really a pretty nice machine all things considered, particularly once you deprecate the tapes in favor of disks and you utilize some of the bug-fixed ROM chips.



#303 Bill Loguidice OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Dec 7, 2017 3:05 PM

I said before, but so many videogame histories tend to skim over everything pre-NES, except maybe to mention how "ET destroyed the industry". The whole era doesn't get enough credit.

 

Maybe, maybe not. Since 2009, at least four of my books don't gloss over it, and there are several that I can think of from some colleagues that do a good job of not leaving anything out either. I've also noticed an increase in the number of books dedicated to something that's either from or originated in the pre-Crash era, be it computer- or videogame-related. So I'd say the collective we are doing a very good job these days of giving that era its just due. Of course, it will never be quite as high profile or popular as some of the stuff in the post-Crash era, but that's to be expected for a variety of reasons. 



#304 pacman000 OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Dec 7, 2017 3:36 PM

Most of the histories I've read were written 15-20 years ago. At the time Atari and the early 80's were the big nostalgia magnets, so they do a decent job there. They also blame the crash equally on bad video games and the rise of home computers. ET, if mentioned at all, is only an example of a bad game, not the only game blamed.

http://thedoteaters.com/?page_id=6

http://www.videogames.org

Of course, I'm biased towards Atari, so I also tend to choose Atari-centric sites. ;)

#305 zzip OFFLINE  

zzip

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Posted Thu Dec 7, 2017 3:38 PM

Maybe, maybe not. Since 2009, at least four of my books don't gloss over it, and there are several that I can think of from some colleagues that do a good job of not leaving anything out either. I've also noticed an increase in the number of books dedicated to something that's either from or originated in the pre-Crash era, be it computer- or videogame-related. So I'd say the collective we are doing a very good job these days of giving that era its just due. Of course, it will never be quite as high profile or popular as some of the stuff in the post-Crash era, but that's to be expected for a variety of reasons.


That's good. I see the problem mostly in articles on mainstream gaming sites or youtube videos. Obviously not as well researched as a book, but still it would be nice if they didn't pretend Videogames started with NES.

#306 Duke75 OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Dec 7, 2017 4:20 PM

That's good. I see the problem mostly in articles on mainstream gaming sites or youtube videos. Obviously not as well researched as a book, but still it would be nice if they didn't pretend Videogames started with NES.

 

Yeah, I've noticed this as well. Even fairly good historians tend to start everything with the NES, often dismissing what came before as too primitive to generate substantial discussion, especially since a lot of the younger guys are really into the "games as storytelling medium" stuff and not as much into, say, analyzing gameplay algorithms.



#307 Schizophretard OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 8, 2017 4:41 AM

 

If we reset with a clear query, I'll certainly be happy to defend for/against a position, but honestly, at this point, I don't even know what we're discussing/arguing anymore.  icon_smile.gif

 

"It's more about whether optional add-ons should be counted the same as in-cartridge helper chips."



#308 Jinks OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Dec 9, 2017 8:43 PM

 
"It's more about whether optional add-ons should be counted the same as in-cartridge helper chips."

Same. Both plug in and give the underpowered system more power.

#309 TheTIGuy OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Dec 10, 2017 3:40 AM

Because Sega's 32X and CD went soooooo well and had soooo many great titles...

EDIT: Also; fanboi alert!


Edited by TheTIGuy, Sun Dec 10, 2017 3:41 AM.


#310 lawdawg710 OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Dec 10, 2017 12:35 PM

Donkey Kong was released on cartridge by Coleco for sale once the Adam was released, several can be found cib (albeit costly) but the version that was packed in with the Colecovision was released for retail!




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