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Net Neutrality


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Poll: Net Neutrality (44 member(s) have cast votes)

Are you for or against "Net Neutrality"?

  1. Voted I'm for it! (30 votes [68.18%])

    Percentage of vote: 68.18%

  2. I'm against it! (14 votes [31.82%])

    Percentage of vote: 31.82%

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#51 marc.hull OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:22 PM

Just a figure of speech and I am sorry if I offended but the reality is if you don't like your circumstances then either make a change or accept your lot.

The world does not owe you any favors.

#52 Dripfree OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:34 PM

I want retro gaming neutrality. I'm sick of the fact that certain games and systems that I want are out of my price range or simply not available in my area. They should all be the same price and available to all...

I'm sure there is something the government can and should do to fix this problem of mine.

#53 SignGuy81 OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:52 PM

This isn't like choosing your mechanic or any other service where you have many choices to choose from.

 

These companies knew fair well in advance when they got into the business that there can be stipulations put in place.  They don't own the cities, towns, etc. or even property they run their lines on.  If the government is going to grant them permission to place their utility lines, poles, equipment on public right of ways then the government in has a right to make rules they must follow, plain and simple.


Edited by SignGuy81, Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:56 PM.


#54 marc.hull OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:11 PM

This isn't like choosing your mechanic or any other service where you have many choices to choose from.
 
These companies knew fair well in advance when they got into the business that there can be stipulations put in place.  They don't own the cities, towns, etc. or even property they run their lines on.  If the government is going to grant them permission to place their utility lines, poles, equipment on public right of ways then the government in has a right to make rules they must follow, plain and simple.


Naahh. Your a p..p...... p........pretty interesting purson.

#55 1980gamer OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:15 PM

at least here in the north east.  Cable has regional monopolies.

 

I think some of the point of this is being missed completely.   It doesn't matter who you use for a provider.

 

At some point BACKBONE bandwidth is used between user and content.

The backbone provider cannot limit US at this point. 

 

It will not matter if you have T3 or dial up, Backbone providers could simply say, NO xyz traffic allowed or limit it at the very least.

 

Don't think of Verizon as a Phone, TV and Internet provider.   They have SO much more control over you than that.

 

Run a tracert to some of your favorite sites and any hop outside your provider is a potential bottleneck.

 

But remember, you have choices.  You can choose to read a book.  Not a Kindle type book,  a paper one! 

 

 

Seems netfiix  sees the writing on the wall and already bribed bent over for the backbone providers. 

Why would they do this if the BS wasn't right around the corner?   



#56 icemanxp300 OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:48 PM

Iceman

I'm just hearing a lot of me! me! me! from you. I actually do know someone who moved because the local internet services could not meet his buisness needs. People are moving right now so they can live somewhere they can smoke pot. Others are moving to get away from potheads. The scenarios you are describing are purely recreational. The idea that you think your scenario warents government intervention is ludicrous. If you want to make a convincing argument do not argue your personal circumstances.

 

Yes you are hearing a lot about me because I was told I had choices and I do not have choices, at least ones I consider choices. Plus my situation is the situation of many.

 

When I purchased my house I made sure it was cable accessible. I refuse to live in an area that offers shitty internet service. So yeah if I had to I would likely move too. However I shouldn't have too!

 

I never said I think anything deserves government intervention. I simply think things will get worse if net neutrality is taken away. Take away the government all you want I don't care. I do care about getting shittier service which cost me more because of those changes. 



#57 SignGuy81 OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:51 PM

ISPs believe they are going to be charging websites for fast lanes if this happens and make lots of $$$.  You can block your website from an ISP.  So instead a big site might just say no thanks, and block all of that ISPs users from visiting their site or redirect them a page telling them to call their ISP and demand the site be in the fast lane. 

 

Regardless of whether it's highly popular sites that could do that, or others with megabucks to pay for the fast lanes, where does that leave the entrepreneur who wants to create the next big thing.  Sorry pal you're outta luck, you can't enjoy the freedom these big corporations had back before when they started back in internet's heday.  But hey you are so much smaller than me anyway you would've never made it because I'm so big I bought all competing startups out before they got big enough to compete with me and I would have most certainly done same with you.  Well, to bad for you because I don't even have to do that anymore so you're outta luck there too.  I don't even have to pay you because who's gonna visit your slow site(gotta admit it is better than mine, good thing I bought the government), the government has my back now.


Edited by SignGuy81, Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:56 PM.


#58 --- Ω --- OFFLINE  

--- Ω ---

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Posted Fri Dec 1, 2017 12:05 PM

This topic is indeed a two sided coin from hell...

 

Government regulation has been known to stifle development and innovation.  Monopolies rarely focus on the consumer's needs or wants, but seem to focus mainly on the monetary aspects, like bill collection, stock/bond prices or lobbyist activities...like most entrenched bureaucracies.

 

Being totally unregulated would give major corporations who control so much of the information flow already the ability to deny access to some sources or extort people into paying more money for others.  This could potentially lead to reduced Internet activity, less commerce and an unknown effect on the economy. 

 

Nothing is perfect, nothing ever will be, but sometimes it can be wise to stick with what's working.  It it's not currently broken, why try to fix it and potentially ruin everything?

 

One thing is certain, we'll all see how it eventually plays out.   



#59 TheTIGuy OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 1, 2017 12:52 PM

Ok , fine.

Swiss Flag.gif



#60 JamesD ONLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 1, 2017 1:03 PM

...

Nothing is perfect, nothing ever will be, but sometimes it can be wise to stick with what's working.  It it's not currently broken, why try to fix it and potentially ruin everything?

...

Are you talking before or after the FCC got involved?



#61 MarkO OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Dec 5, 2017 4:44 PM

You are just unbelievable. Whether your signal travels through cellphone, tablet, or whatever else is really irrelevant. You are still using the same shitty wireless service.

<< BIG SNIP >


The ISPs in my area that offer this kind of service are using Point-to-Point Microwave with Fiber from the Towers to the ISP and then the Internet..

As an Individual User, you don't share the Bandwidth to the Tower, but do share it with all the other Point-to-Point Microwave Users to the ISP.

For areas not served with Coaxial Cable or Fiber, it's way better than DSL, or Cellular Systems..

MarkO

Edited by MarkO, Tue Dec 5, 2017 4:48 PM.


#62 Random Terrain OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Dec 17, 2017 5:16 AM

For people who don't visit the off-topic forums:

R.I.P. The Internet (from The Late Show with Stephen Colbert)
 

Speaking of ending regulations, anybody here use the Internet? Anybody? Yeah, okay. If you don't, it's great. You should Google it, it's fantastic. But it's a sad day for us Web-keteers, us internauts, because earlier this afternoon the FCC voted to repeal net neutrality. Yeah, see, what that really means it means repealing regulations that prevented your internet provider from blocking certain websites or slowing down your data. Now they can and that's wrong because the only thing that should slow your Internet speed is the number of people also sitting at Starbucks working on their screenplays. Until this until this afternoon, the rules "prohibited broadband providers from striking special deals that would give some websites or apps 'priority' over others." So now a big player like Google could make their site load faster than a smaller player like Etsy, which is bad news for my Etsy shop 'Steve's Sleeves.' Some people sell shirts with the sleeves cut off. Steve's sells sleeves with the shirts cut off. "Steve's Sleeves: you have the right to not bare arms."

By killing net neutrality, Internet providers can basically do whatever they want as long as they disclose to their users what exactly they do to Web traffic. So get ready for more fine print from your Internet provider. At least you'll have something to read while you wait for web sites to load.

But don't worry folks, big companies like Verizon and Comcast, who have spent millions of dollars lobbying to be able to block, slowdown, or prioritize any web traffic, are assuring their customers that they do not intend to block, slowdown, or prioritize any web traffic. Also, the shark lobby says they don't intend to eat people even though they spent millions lobbying to have their mouths reclassified as sleeping bags.

This is a real hot-button issue as evidenced by the fact that the FCC received 22 million public comments, but an investigation has revealed as many as 2 million of those comments were fake and half a million originated from Russian email addresses. Come on, Russia. Can't you just leave America alone? Go rig the winner of "Norway's Got Talent" or something. But the FCC wants you to believe that killing net neutrality is a good idea, so they send out FCC Chairman and Big & Tall tooth model Ajit Pai. And Pai put out a video called "Seven Things You Can Still Do on the Internet After Net Neutrality" to show all the cool Millennials out there that deregulation is super 'lit.'

"Here are just a few of the things you'll still be able to do on the Internet after these Obama-era regulations are repealed. You can still gram your food. You can still shop for all your Christmas presents online. Yes! Got that bulk deal on fidget spinners! You can still drive memes right into the ground."

And you know as a wealthy middle-aged man who benefits when giant media corporations get their way, I just want to add "repealing net neutrality is totally woke my chicken nugget teens! Szechuan sauce! Avocado selfie!" I think what I said means something.


 
Here's a not safe for work video from Dec 14, 2017:

youtube.com/watch?v=FahTSQSXskw



Here's a not safe for work video from May of 2017:

youtube.com/watch?v=92vuuZt7wak



Gizmodo video published on Dec 11, 2017:

youtube.com/watch?v=DzHleu03fxY


A YouTube user named horseytown posted this about the video above:

"Ajit Pai, the conspiracy theory isn't that you were specifically sent by Verizon to do this, it's that you, as an unelected official, did this to benefit companies SUCH AS your former employer, rather than in the interests of the American people who overwhelmingly supported Net Neutrality. When you leave the FCC you will undoubtedly go work for one of the corporations that you gave this gift. It's not a conspiracy, it's a likelihood. Also, cute that you mock this 'conspiracy theory' and then have an actual Pizzagate conspiracy theorist dance in your unfunny little troll video."


More from Gizmodo:

Ajit Pai Thinks You're Stupid Enough to Buy This Crap [Update: One of the 7 Things Is Dancing With a Pizzagater]
 
 
 
Here's a little history from Popular Science:
 


Lie: Everything was great back before 2015.

The original net neutrality rules didn’t come out of nowhere. In fact, there were several rather important things that happened before they were put in place.

Perhaps the biggest issue happened in 2014 when Level 3, a telecommunications company that helps ISPs connect to the Internet, found major ISPs throttling internet speeds on services like Netflix.

In 2012, AT&T blocked users on its lower tier services from using Apple’s FaceTime video chat feature, a move that caused huge public outcry.

When Google announced its Wallet app, mobile providers tried to block it for competing with their own solutions.

AT&T tried blocking Skype to cut down on competition with its own services.

Or, look to the parts of the world. KPN, a telecom company in the Netherlands, tried to apply an extra tariff on messaging apps force people into buying texting plans that worked on the cellular network. The move was blocked by the government.

 
 
And don't forget what Time Warner cable tried to do back in 2009:
 
Bend over for Time Warner Cable
 
web.archive.org/ (April 2, 2009)


Time Warner Cable will roll out an Internet bandwidth cap program in Greensboro [North Carolina]. The new program will mean customers could be charged for using too much bandwidth through Time Warner's internet service.

According to an article on www.businessinsider.com once downloads and uploads hit the set limit, you will have to pay extra -- potentially $100 or more extra, depending on how much bandwidth you consume.

The changes come as Time Warner looks for additional sources of income, and targets people that use excessive amounts of bandwidth.

According to www.businessinsider.com, plans will range from $30 to $55 per month, depending on the cap -- 5 GB, 10 GB, 20 GB, and 40 GB caps are available, with a $1 per GB overage charge.

The new plans took effect as of March 31.

What does this mean for you? If you watch about 7 hours a week of standard-def video, or 2.5 hours a week of hi-def Web video, you could easily pass even the 40 GB cap. After that, each iTunes movie rental -- or Netflix (NFLX) stream, or whatever -- could cost $1 to $4 more. Or Hulu episodes could cost $0.30 to $0.50. That doesn't even include your other Web usage, such as downloading music, using the Web, etc.



#63 TPA5 OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Dec 18, 2017 11:20 AM

Companies and governments don't want to just make "a lot" of money. They don't even want to make "a ton" of money. They want to make all the money there is to be made, until there is nothing left. They want to crush the people under their boot, and wring every last dime from the corpses. Greed is a magical force that jumps party lines and infects people like a cancer. And that's what this whole thing boils down to. Meaningless numbers in a bank account.



#64 marc.hull OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Dec 18, 2017 7:23 PM

You guys should start a revolt and just leave the internet.

#65 NE146 ONLINE  

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Posted Mon Dec 18, 2017 9:31 PM

Companies and governments don't want to just make "a lot" of money. They don't even want to make "a ton" of money. They want to make all the money there is to be made, until there is nothing left. They want to crush the people under their boot, and wring every last dime from the corpses. Greed is a magical force that jumps party lines and infects people like a cancer. And that's what this whole thing boils down to. Meaningless numbers in a bank account.

Kumbaya! :)



#66 JamesD ONLINE  

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Posted Tue Dec 19, 2017 12:45 PM

So, who's Netflix jumped in price?



#67 Random Terrain OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Dec 19, 2017 12:59 PM

So, who's Netflix jumped in price?


Yeah, because everything moves that fast. You have to wait for a special date on the calendar before committees can have their Illuminati-style Eyes Wide Shut naked sex rituals around a bonfire as they drink the blood of freshly killed virgins in front of a giant owl statue before they'll know exactly what to do. You might have to wait until after the spring equinox before you hear about any major plans.



#68 NE146 ONLINE  

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Posted Tue Dec 19, 2017 4:06 PM

I dunno.. I killed off my Netflix subscription when I checked my account history, and saw no one in my family had watched anything on it in almost 2 years :lol: 






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