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First time seeing leaked caps on a 4A motherboard

motherboard capacitor leak

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#1 OLD CS1 OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Jan 29, 2018 9:08 PM

Tonight is a first for me.  I recently picked up a beige v2.2 console and it does not power up.

 

Aside from a power supply with a red LED shoved back onto itself (which gave me a good chuckle,) I found two leaked capacitors: a purple 100μF 16V to the bottom-left of the CPU, and one of the two 100μF 16V next to the VDP.

 

These are axials and I do not have radials with long enough leads on-hand to replace them so I cannot be sure these are actually the problem, but they certainly represent a problem.

 

I looked around the board and found these electrolytic capacitors:

 

3x 100μF 16V

4x 22μF 25V

1x 10μF 35V

and one which has a value I cannot see but looks like one of the 22μF 25V.  Note none of the Nichicons, the 22s and 10s, have leaked.



#2 SignGuy81 OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Jan 29, 2018 9:18 PM


 

These are axials and I do not have radials with long enough leads on-hand to replace them so I cannot be sure these are actually the problem, but they certainly represent a problem.

 

Just solder some wire onto one of the leads to make it longer, then put heatshrink around it and bend it along the cap and then down  to make it work.  Had to do it a few times if you want to make it nice and neat you can use hot glue as well.



#3 OLD CS1 OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Jan 29, 2018 9:22 PM

 

Just solder some wire onto one of the leads to make it longer, then put heatshrink around it and bend it along the cap and then down  to make it work.  Had to do it a few times if you want to make it nice and neat you can use hot glue as well.

 

A good idea.  What is funny is I actually thought about that after I posted and set the board to the side.  Then I thought, "That sounds like work." ;)

 

It is on my List of Things to DoTM and I hope to get to it this week.



#4 mister35mm OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jan 30, 2018 4:59 AM

Just goes to show that TI used pretty good components in the day, but nothing lasts forever.



#5 Vorticon OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jan 30, 2018 7:48 AM

First time I ever heard of this problem on a TI. Compare this to the Amiga for example ;)



#6 sparkdrummer OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jan 30, 2018 7:56 AM

I would bet money that TI only used prime/first rate components in the building our our 99's.
Hell, It's my understanding that it cost them over $100 just to build them back in the day. I wonder what C64's cost to build?


 



#7 OLD CS1 OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Jan 30, 2018 11:19 AM

True on the Amiga... if you have not had yours re-capped you are living on borrowed time.  That and the battery on the big-boxes and 500+.

 

As for the C64, while entirely possible I have never come across a bad cap on a 64 board.







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