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So, why isn't the Lynx more popular?


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#51 Hwlngmad OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 29, 2018 1:48 PM

Personally, I really loved my Lynx.  It was a great handheld and I really enjoyed it a lot more than the OG GameBoy, which I sold back in my playing days as I couldn't stand it.  However, while it was the superior handheld (Turbo Express and/or Sega Nomad withstanding), it just didn't have the clout like Nintendo had to really sell the system.  Also, the initial price tag really hurt it when it was released as well.  That being said, it was a great handheld that should've/could've done lots better given better circumstances.



#52 doctorclu OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 29, 2018 2:08 PM

I think it's more that Gameboy was cheap.

 

Yep, great answer.   Provide better speed, color, better graphics, what matters in the end?  

 

"Do I mow yards for a week and get a Gameboy, or mow yards for two weeks and get a Lynx?   Hmmm... Gameboy!"

 

I remember the thought process of the Atari 400 over the ColecoVision...

 

"I got $150 for my Atari 2600.  Do I continue to save money, and buy a Colecovision and then some more money to buy games ...

...or do I spend the $150 I already have on a Atari 400, get a $50 rebate?"

 

And we were able to get a floppy drive an disks.  I copied like 25 games from a friend's Atari 800 game collection.  The rest was history.

All about what you can get relatively quickly.



#53 ThomH OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 29, 2018 2:53 PM

Versus the Gameboy, I have to agree with those above re: the content. For me the Lynx is the endpoint of a certain lineage of game design which I can't quite coherently qualify — certainly it includes a particular sense of direct pixel control, and a focus on scores, on speedy reactions, on games seeking to overwhelm the player with action. I guess maybe I'm describing "arcade" games — but in any case something very Atari and mostly very American. Something that hasn't really survived to the modern day, unlike the Nintendo type of title. So it's just somehow a little more alien.

 

But compared to other Atari machines? I don't know. For me it's the ideal Atari for the modern world: it's compact, there's no need to try to locate a CRT or figure out some way to coax a modern TV set into handling vintage video signals (and getting into that whole hornets nest of latency trade-offs), and it's even an easy target for hobby development.



#54 doctorclu OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 29, 2018 3:26 PM

Part of the lack of love is for the longest time, prior to the recent SD cart, there was really no great dev environment or rom loader.    Well to clarify, not a easy ones to work with.   Lynxman's was a good single loader which required a serial connection.  The multibank one that came out was about the same.

 

So while rom loading options were there, they were a bit of a pain even still.

 

Hopefully with the Saint SD cart things will be a bit better.



#55 Hwlngmad OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 29, 2018 3:45 PM

I really think the "lack of love" was marketing.  Nintendo had it in spades versus late 80s, early 90s Atari.  Nintendo was everywhere and the fact that the GameBoy came packed with either Super Mario Land and/or Tetris, which appealed to so many people, it made any competitor, including Sega and/or Atari, really difficult.  This and the price difference ($90 versus $180) made the GameBoy a runaway success.



#56 Lost Dragon OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Aug 29, 2018 5:04 PM

Yep, great answer.   Provide better speed, color, better graphics, what matters in the end?  
 
"Do I mow yards for a week and get a Gameboy, or mow yards for two weeks and get a Lynx?   Hmmm... Gameboy!"
 
I remember the thought process of the Atari 400 over the ColecoVision...
 
"I got $150 for my Atari 2600.  Do I continue to save money, and buy a Colecovision and then some more money to buy games ...
...or do I spend the $150 I already have on a Atari 400, get a $50 rebate?"
 
And we were able to get a floppy drive an disks.  I copied like 25 games from a friend's Atari 800 game collection.  The rest was history.
All about what you can get relatively quickly.


Even if Atari had managed to get the LCD screens cheaper and thus put the itself Lynx out at a cheaper price, it would of done nothing to overcome the glaring shortcomings the Lynx suffered...

Software or rather lack of it.

Nintendo had the lions share.

Sega could fall back on it's own I.P's and strong 3rd party support from likes of UK/European developers...

But Atari just were so far behind.

Annoucing new games? that they had down to a fine art, but delivering on those promises. .totally different matter.

#57 Hwlngmad OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Aug 30, 2018 7:22 AM

I have to say that I really thought the software of the Lynx was pretty good.  Blue Lightining, Warbirds, Rampart, A.P.B., etc were all really good games.  Sure, there were some stinkers like Kung Food, but I really think what ultimately sunk the Lynx was the initial price and marketing, not necessarily the software as there were/are plenty of good titles on it.






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