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How to make your own ColecoVision Power Supply that operates worldwide


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#1 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 1:19 AM

How to make your own ColecoVision Power Supply that operates between 100-240 Volts at 50/60Hz

 

I was originally going to post this thread around a week ago, however I ended up getting very busy multi-tasking with several different projects going on, therefore I am taking the time to post the thread now.

 

600 Watt Titanium Nicked Coated ColecoVision Power Supply

 

Below is a picture of a top of the line Titanium Nickel coated 600 Watt XION PowerReal ATX Power Supply that has a ColecoVision UL listed wiring harness installed. This original Coleco cord was removed from a defective 36 year old ColecoVision Power Supply and installed on a factory new XON-600F147-201 600 Watt Power Supply.

 

I was only able to locate one factory new Titanium Nickel Coated 600 Watt Power Supply with the -5 Volts DC feature for around $35 after shipping. I am considering keeping this power supply for myself because I cannot get anymore and it’s the only -5 Volts DC power supply that I have seen that offers up to a 1 Amp output for both the -5 Volts DC feature and the -12 Volts DC feature. ATX power supplies with the -5 Volts DC feature are not being made anymore, and around 95% of the ones that were made with -5 Volts DC feature only have 0.5 amps capacity and not the full 1 amp capacity. What this means is that if I had a spare ADAM Memory Console Power cord (Also called an ADAM printer power cord), then this 600 Watt Power supply is powerful enough to power a ADAM computer and a ColecoVision at the exact same time. The problem is I used up all my spare ADAM Memory Console cords. However, it would have been very cool to have both an ADAM and ColecoVision power cord coming out of the same power supply. This 600 Watt Power Supply can literally power 10 ColecoVision game systems at the exact same time if I had 10 ColecoVision power cords to connect to the power supply. Perhaps one day a third party company well make a ColecoVision and ADAM compatible power cords that are the same quality or better quality when compared to the original Coleco versions.

 

I might end up keeping this 600 Watt power supply because I cannot find anymore new ones, and it’s a lot more complicated and takes around twice as long to modify when compared to the already time consuming Apollo 400 Watt Power Supply for the ADAM or ColecoVision. The fan controller circuit board for this 600 watt power supply makes onscreen RF noise when connected to the ColecoVision game system. Therefore, to fix this RF noise issue one needs to unplug the fan from the fan controller circuit board and remove the variable manually fan speed control, and then plug the fan directly into the main power coming out of the power supplies wire harness. In addition these power supplies are designed to be enclosed inside a system case where the fan is designed to move extremely warm air out of the computer case. When the power supply is outside of a system case one can slow down the fan to make the power supply very quiet while at the same time providing plenty of air flow that keeps the power supply cool. The way a variable fan power supply works is that the fan is connected to 12 volts for full speed, 5 volts for slower speed, and 3.3 volts for the slowest speed. Therefore, this power supplies fan was manually wired to the orange 3.3 volts and the black ground wires of the power supplies wire harness to make the fan super quiet. I also did not like the blue LED lights on this power supply when using the ColecoVision in a dark room, therefore I removed the blue LED function from the power supply fan so that it no longer lights up.  

 

This 600 watt power supply is the best power supply that I have ever seen with the -5 volts DC feature but I cannot find anymore new ones on the market to offer it in QTY (plus I do not have any more original Coleco power cords). MTBF rating is over 100,000+ hours on this power supply. The build quality on this 600 Watt power supply is outstanding and if I was going to sale it I would give a 2 year warranty however because of the labor involved most people would not pay $149.99 for this power supply. If one can find a new or used 600 Watt XON-600F147-201 (UPC 842431031037) power supply I do not recommend buying it for the ColecoVision or ADAM since there is a massive amount of modifications that need to be made to make it work properly for a classic ColecoVision or ADAM computer.  

 

However here is pictures of the one and only 600 Watt Titanium Nicked Coated ColecoVision Power Supply (this power supplies case is scratch resistant compared to other power supply cases that I have worked with).

Attached Thumbnails

  • 600 watt view 1.JPG
  • 600 watt view 2.JPG
  • 600 watt view 3.JPG
  • 600 watt view 4.JPG
  • 600 watt view 5.JPG
  • 600 watt view 6.JPG
  • 600 watt view 7.JPG
  • USA power cord for 600 watt power supply.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P, Sat Oct 27, 2018 1:21 AM.


#2 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 1:34 AM

550 Watt Power Supply for the ColecoVision

 

Between the years of 2010-2014 Logisys made ATX power supplies with the -5 volts DC feature. Now they have either removed the -5 volts DC feature from their power supplies manufactured around 2015-2018+ or they have completely discontinued those -5 volts DC models. On my shelf I had stored away new in the retail box the Logisys PS550A-BK (UPC code 862626001563). This power supply has a MTBF of 100,000 hours. It offers the -5 volts DC feature at up to 0.5 amps and also the -12 volts DC feature at up to 0.8 amps. The -12 volts DC feature is still offered on modern 2018 ATX power supplies but even that feature is slowing fading away with some of the latest -12 volts DC power supplies only offering 0.5 amps and even 0.3 amps on some models. The ColecoVision and ADAM computer need -5 volts DC, +5 volts DC, and +12 volts DC, and do not use -12 volts DC. However computers like the Commodore Amiga and some other computers need the –12 volts DC feature so hopefully for at least a few years that feature might still be offered.   

 

The one negative feature of this 550 watt power supply was the extremely loud dual fans that operate at 12 volts. Since the power supply was designed to be in an enclosed very warm computer case it has massive amount of noisy fans, however both fans can be made very silent with plenty of air flow if the power supply is going to be used for the ColecoVision or ADAM. I disconnected both fans from the 12 volts DC rails and connected the fans to the orange +3.3 volts DC rails which slowed down the RPM speeds while at the same time offering plenty of air flow with two whisper quite fans.

 

If one is able to find a new or used 550 watt Logisys power supply for around $35 with the -5 volts DC feature, then I have to say this was the most easiest ATX power supply to modify to work on the ColecoVision or ADAM computer. This is a full size ATX power supply and not like working on the 400 watt Apollo power supply that uses a micro SFX power supply design. Those micro SFX power supplies are hard to install a wire harness because of the tight space to work in. This 550 watt full size ATX power supply has plenty of room to work in which also results in less labor time to install a wire hareness. I might keep this power supply but if I every offered it for sale I might sale it for around $89.99.  If one can find the power supply for $35 and then if one purchases a ColecoVision power cord for around $20, and then with around $5 in additional high quality parts to attached the wire harness, that would be equal to around $60 to make a ColecoVision power supply under ideal conditions. In addition, one might be able to find a lower quality and lower price ATX power supply without the on and off switch. Technically if the on and off switch is working fine on the ColecoVision console, one does not need a second on and off switch on the power supply itself.

 

Here is the pictures of the Logisys 550 watt power supply for the ColecoVision. I wish I could find more of these so I could offer it to the ColecoVision/ADAM community, but they are no longer being made and all or most dealers are out of stock.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 550 watt view 1.JPG
  • 550 watt view 2.JPG
  • 550 watt view 3.JPG
  • 550 watt view 4.JPG
  • 550 watt view 5.JPG
  • 550 watt view 6.JPG
  • 550 watt view 7.JPG


#3 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 2:10 AM

Some detailed information on how to install a ColecoVision wire harness on a ATX Power Supply

Warning: This project is for people that have the certifications and degrees to work on high voltage equipment that uses up to 240 volts AC. The power supply should be unplugged from the AC outlet before removing the power supply cover to prevent the possibility of being accidently electrocuted by touching the high voltage section of the power supply. Also removing the power supply cover also voids the manufactories warranty. Installing a ColecoVision wire harness on a ATX power supply is easier and less time consuming then installing a ADAM computer wire harness. However it still takes a long time to install a ColecoVision wire harness on a ATX power supply.   

 

(Step one): One of the hardness and most time consuming parts of this project is to find a new or used ATX power supply that actually offers the -5 volts DC feature with a good quality output that well not cause screen interference. In addition, some manufactories of ATX power supplies have removed the -5 volts DC feature from the latest run coming off the assembly line and then they forgot to remove the -5 volts DC from the spec sheet label on the power supply. After finding a ATX power supply with the -5 volts DC feature, before removing the cover to the power supply to install a wire harness, make sure the power supply works properly on the ColecoVision or ADAM. I have had to returned a few brands and models because of either not offering the -5 volts DC feature like what is stated in the specs, or offering a power supply that has too much interference issues when used on the ColecoVision or ADAM. For several years I have owned a Thermaltake DR. Power II tester that currently sales for around $32.80 (There might be better quality and cheaper testers on the market now). Also using a Digital Multi-meter is ideal. This very high quality ATX breakout board from China for around $6.81 plus free shipping is an awesome must have device that well instantly let one know if there is going to be any electrical problems or quality problems when the power supply is connected to the ColecoVision or ADAM computer. One just plugs the 20 pin or 24 pin ATX power supply into this breakout board and wires the black ColecoVision power cord or gray Coleco ADAM power cord to the breakout board. Then instantly one can verify the ATX power supply is going work with the ADAM computer or ColecoVision. If the power supply is bad, then one returns it for a refund, however if the power supply is good, then one can then open up the power supply and remove the wire harness and install the official Coleco ADAM wire harness or an official ColecoVision wire harness. Yes it costs an additional $6.81 for this hardware device that can take a few weeks or several weeks to arrive from China with free shipping option, however it’s a big time saver in case there is something wrong with the ATX power supply.

 

(Step two): Once you have verified the ColecoVision is working correctly with the ATX power supply breakout board. Now it is time to decide on if you are going to wire the connectors in the power supply to the ColecoVision power cord using some type of UL listed crimp on connectors or if one wants to solder the wires directly on the circuit board. Many people choose not to mess with the solder on a high voltage power supply circuit board to maintain the power supplies safety certifications. Instead, many people well attach the UL listed ColecoVision power cord to the power supplies wire harness using high quality UL listed connectors. If the fan is too noisy in the ATX power supply you might want to connect the fan to the orange 3.3 volts instead of the default 12 volts as long as the air flow and temperature of the power supply works fine at a slower rpm fan speed.

 

Here is some important wiring information that one needs to know for this project

 

(Step three): After purchasing a defective ColecoVision power supply for around $20 from someone, verify that it truly is defective before cracking the plastic case open. It is possible to repair the ColecoVision power supply at the component level, however since there is no screws to open the plastic case this means that one would need to glue the plastic case back together and that would not look good cosmetically (the picture below of a black ColecoVision power cube that was cracked open with a hammer looks fairly ok, but in reality most the ones that are opened up look much worse since its hard to open the case perfectly with a hammer). ** Wear protective eye protection when cracking open a ColecoVision power cube since small plastic flies in the air when the hammer or when some other opening methods are used **. With a de-soldering iron remove the ColecoVision power supply cord from the circuit board (4 wires: yellow, blue, white, and red).

 

(Step four): Pinout information for the ColecoVision power cord: Yellow is -5V DC, blue is GND, white is +5V DC, and red is +12V DC.

 

(Step five): On the ColecoVision power cord connect the yellow -5V DC cable to the one and only white -5V DC cable on the ATX wire harness.

 

(Step six): On the ColecoVision power cord connect the blue GND cable to any of the black GND cables on the ATX power supply.

 

(Step seven): On the ColecoVision power cord connect the white +5V DC cable to any of the red +5V DC cables on the ATX power supply.

 

(Step eight): On the ColecoVision power supply connect the red +12V DC cable to any of the yellow +12V DC cables on the ATX power supply.

 

(Step nine): Make sure all wires are well insulated with UL approved material. One may choose to make the fan whisper quiet by moving the case fan or fans from 12 volts to the orange 3.3 volt rail. This makes the fan speed slower since it does not need to spin as fast when the power supply is not placed inside a warm enclosed computer case. Then put the cover back on the ATX power supply. Use a multi-meter like shown in the pictures below to verify your wiring is correct on the ColecoVision 4 pin power cable connector. Once everything has been verified, then one is ready to connect the power supply to their ColecoVision.

 

If one owns a powerful enough ATX power supply like a 600 watt model, then its possible to power a ADAM computer, ColecoVision, Commodore Amiga, and several other videogame and computer systems at the exact same time if the correct custom power cords are connected to the ATX power supply. It is disappointment that no company has every made a fully modular ATX power supply with the -5V DC feature, since if a fully modular power supply with -5V DC feature existed, then one could just make up several different ATX power cords and then there would never be a need to open a ATX power supply and void the manufactories warranty.

 

If one is interested in the detailed steps on how to create one’s own Coleco ADAM power supply using a ATX power supply see the following link.

 

Apollo 400 Watt Power Supply for the ADAM Computer Memory Console

Attached Thumbnails

  • ColecoVision power cord view.JPG
  • 4 prong Coleco plug.JPG
  • Position of Pin one and voltage.JPG
  • Position of Pin two and voltage.JPG
  • Position of Pin three and voltage.JPG
  • ColecoVision power adapter.JPG
  • Colecovision adapter inside view 1.JPG
  • ColecoVision adapter inside view 2.JPG
  • ColecoVision adapter inside view 3.JPG
  • ColecoVision power cable.JPG
  • ATX Breakout board.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P, Sat Oct 27, 2018 2:46 AM.


#4 Ruggers Customs OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 7:49 AM

There's a usb power supply by Dragon Box that Console5 will start stocking in the next couple of months give or take with an estimated price tag of around 40 bucks.  You can also preorder directly from DragonBox.  



#5 Ruggers Customs OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 7:57 AM

Then there's these too which are a much cheaper and better option if one just can't wait.  Some modifications will be needed to make it safe such as desoldering the front screw connector and hard wiring the ac plug and coleco connector inside.  I also recommend putting a sheet of mylar in between the bottom of the board and the case and cutting a small piece to cover the open slot where the front screw connector was.  Honestly, if you're gonna spend the money and time on this and wiring then it would probably just be better to purchase another used OEM power supply unit off Ebay for 30 to 50 bucks.  That is if one can't wait for the USB power supply to be released.  Just something to think about.

 

 

https://www.ebay.com...&frcectupt=true



#6 5-11under ONLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 8:10 AM

Then there's these too which are a much cheaper and better option if one just can't wait.  Some modifications will be needed to make it safe such as desoldering the front screw connector and hard wiring the ac plug and coleco connector inside.  I also recommend putting a sheet of mylar in between the bottom of the board and the case and cutting a small piece to cover the open slot where the front screw connector was.  Honestly, if you're gonna spend the money and time on this and wiring then it would probably just be better to purchase another used OEM power supply unit off Ebay for 30 to 50 bucks.  That is if one can't wait for the USB power supply to be released.  Just something to think about.

 

 

https://www.ebay.com...&frcectupt=true

 

It won't be titanium coated, though. :(



#7 TPR OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 9:27 AM

I'm super confused by this. Those power supplies look bigger and heavier than the original brick that came with the ColecoVision.  Unless I'm totally missing the scale of those things... why would someone want to replace their ColecoVision power supply with something even bigger and bulkier? 



#8 remowilliams OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 9:40 AM

Where do the wafers go in?



#9 Ruggers Customs OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 10:13 AM

I'm super confused by this. Those power supplies look bigger and heavier than the original brick that came with the ColecoVision.  Unless I'm totally missing the scale of those things... why would someone want to replace their ColecoVision power supply with something even bigger and bulkier? 

They are heavy and it's not really worth it.  I was just presenting a cheaper and lighter option to the op since he seems to like doing stuff like this for whatever reason.  I don't really see the point to any of it but to each his own I guess.



#10 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 11:41 AM

One important wiring step that I forgot to mention

 

Important step: The ATX power supply one and only green cable is the “power on sensor” that must be wired to any black ground cable so that the ATX power supply well turn on.

 

This link has useful information regarding the ATX power supply wire colors and what voltage levels is assigned to the wires inside the power supply and the ATX 24 pin connector.



#11 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 11:46 AM

There's a usb power supply by Dragon Box that Console5 will start stocking in the next couple of months give or take with an estimated price tag of around 40 bucks.  You can also preorder directly from DragonBox.  

Yes I am very interested in that product because of the very small size and the ability to replace the power supply easily when it goes bad in the future. After buying a high quality USB C power supply for around $12 I have estimated that it well cost around $55 total for the USB adapter and a power supply.



#12 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 12:09 PM

Then there's these too which are a much cheaper and better option if one just can't wait.  Some modifications will be needed to make it safe such as desoldering the front screw connector and hard wiring the ac plug and coleco connector inside.  I also recommend putting a sheet of mylar in between the bottom of the board and the case and cutting a small piece to cover the open slot where the front screw connector was.  Honestly, if you're gonna spend the money and time on this and wiring then it would probably just be better to purchase another used OEM power supply unit off Ebay for 30 to 50 bucks.  That is if one can't wait for the USB power supply to be released.  Just something to think about.

 

 

https://www.ebay.com...&frcectupt=true

On the 550 watt model ATX power supply, that one can be purchased for $35, it costs another $20 to buy a defective ColecoVision power supply from someone and around $5 in parts to interface the ColecoVisoin wire harness to the ATX power supply with no soldering required (Only de-soldering is needed to remove the ColecoVision cord from the circuit board, however de-soldering a power cord is fairly easy task that the average person can do. Soldering a component correctly is much more important and soldering is not required on 99% of ATX power supplies). Therefore total cost with free labor would be around $60. However if one already owns a defective ColecoVision power supply the total cost goes down to $40 since the original Coelco power cord can be taken off the power supply and placed on a ATX power supply (save around $20 by using ones own Coleco cord instead of buying one themselves). Also these ATX power supplies I have been purchasing have a MTBF rating of 100,000 hours and can power several computers and videogame systems at the exact same time if one wants to have several cords coming out of the ATX power supplies wire harness. I can get lower quality 40,000 hour MTBF ATX power supplies for around $15 or $20 and it would cut the projects price in half. So under ideal conditions one can convert a lower end ATX power supply to work on the ColecoVision for around $20 if they already own a defective OEM black ColecoVision power supply with a cord in good condition.   

 

I am all for buying a new or used ColecoVision power supply off EBAY that is working perfectly fine. However many of them are around 36 years old and are not working properly. I wish Coleco would have spent a little bit more money and placed screws in the original black plastic ColecoVision power supply case. Because then one could replace a transformer or repair the defect at the component level and screw the power supply back together. Once one cracks open the ColecoVision power case even if the power supply is repaired it does not look good cosmetically to glue the black case back together. Coleco made these ColecoVision power supplies so that they are disposable. The Coleco ADAM power supply inside the printer can get taken out of the case and repaired and but back in as long as one can find the parts to repair it. Many people throw away their original ColecoVision power supply when it goes bad. This thread just shows people how to keep using the working high quality ColecoVision UL listed power cord and how to attach it to a high quality ATX power supply.    


Edited by HDTV1080P, Sat Oct 27, 2018 12:16 PM.


#13 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 12:50 PM

I'm super confused by this. Those power supplies look bigger and heavier than the original brick that came with the ColecoVision.  Unless I'm totally missing the scale of those things... why would someone want to replace their ColecoVision power supply with something even bigger and bulkier? 

You make some good points. If one already has a working ColecoVision power supply with no age related issues, then they should keep using the smaller wall style ColecoVision power supply. However one day if the 36 year old ColecoVision power supply were to stop working and if one could not find a working 36 year old replacement. Then instead of tossing the ColecoVision power supply in the trash, one removes the high quality UL listed power cord from the bad ColecoVision power supply and installs it on either a full size ATX power supply or some type of micro ATX or micro SFX power supply. The micro size ATX and SFX power supplies are more money and are smaller then the original ADAM power supply but a little bit bigger when compared to the original ColecoVision power supply. Also ATX power supplies operate between 100-240 volts at 50/60Hz for worldwide use. One can not take their original USA ColecoVision power supply on a trip to Europe since that USA power supply is only designed for 120 volts at 60Hz.   

 

The advantage of a full size 600 watt ATX power supply is that it can literally power up to 10 ColecoVisions at the same time if 10 Coleco cords were attached. Or power a Coleco ADAM, ColecoVision, Commodore Amiga, and several other 80's systems all at the same time if one has the proper power cords attached. However the big negative as you pointed out is a full size ATX is big and bulky, however if one hides the power supply behind a TV or other home theater furniture they well not notice its size.

 

To be honest this is a project I should have worked on 5 years ago when there was a wide selection of several dozens of models of -5 volts DC ATX power supplies to choose from back around 2013. Fast forward to 2018 where all or most -5V DC ATX power supplies are out of production, this ends up making this project much more difficult.

 

In reality soon there well be no dealers left to purchase the out of production ATX power supplies with the -5 Volts DC feature. In that day hopefully items like the coming soon ColecoVision USB adapter well be widely available. I heard that around 500 of those USB adapters are going to be ran off in production which is really awesome for ColecoVision owners.      

 

Both the ColecoVision and TI-99/4a use the exact same style 4 pin power cord. Perhaps one day a compatible third party 4 pin power cord well be released on the market. While its hard to find third party power supplies that work with the ADAM computer and ColecoVision, at least with the proper power cord one can use a ATX power supply with the -5 volts DC feature. I feel sorry for the TI-99/4a owners. To my knowledge there has never been a third party power supply made for that computer system. The problem with the TI-99/4a is that it requires 16v ac and 8v ac on the 4 pin connector. Perhaps one day someone well run off around 500 custom made third party power supplies off the assemble line for the TI-99/4a computer.  The TI-99/4a most likely is the most difficult system to make a power supply for since the power supply needs to be made entirely from scratch.   


Edited by HDTV1080P, Sat Oct 27, 2018 1:05 PM.


#14 Tursi OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Oct 27, 2018 11:15 PM

The power in to the TI is straight up AC, the only thing in the big block is a transformer. A center-tap transformer at 18VAC and 8.5VAC and you're done. (And a fuse, cause early supplies were catching fire). The actual power supply PCB is inside the console, right under the black area in front of the cartridge port. That's why it keeps your coffee warm! (And incidentally, this AC voltage is why plugging a TI power brick into your ColecoVision will kill the Coleco. ;) )



#15 Osgeld OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 2, 2018 10:24 PM

a power transformer + colecovision brick would take up less space than an ATX supply, and probably be more reliable than the shit chi-co onehunglow half ass hacked presented here

 

and of course the on the way properly designed switch mode power supply is about the size of a tic-tac box and the same cost of a pre-modded ATX lunchbox 



#16 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 2, 2018 11:49 PM

Yes a ATX power supply is larger. However with 600 watts one can power a ColecoVision, ADAM, ATARI 130XE, Commodore Amiga , and several other systems at the exact same time. Or power 10 ColecoVision's at the same time if one has 10 cords. A ATX power supply has a MTBF rating of 100,000+ and is very reliable. Many wall power bricks are 40,000 hours for MTBF, however a few high end desktop small power supplies are rated at over 100,000+ hours for MTBF.

 

Perhaps one day someone well release a new wall or desktop power supply for the ColecoVision. I am all for that happening. Also I am looking forward to the USB ColecoVision adapter.

 

Also another way to open up a ColecoVision power brink is to use a high quality saw to open the case.  https://www.amleo.co...crid={creative}

 

A hammer is a lot cheaper then spending several hundred dollars or a $1,000+ for a professional saw.   


Edited by HDTV1080P, Fri Nov 2, 2018 11:55 PM.


#17 nick3092 OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 2, 2018 11:58 PM

However with 600 watts one can power a ColecoVision, ADAM, ATARI 130XE, Commodore Amiga , and several other systems at the exact same time. Or power 10 ColecoVision's at the same time if one has 10 cords.


Find me one person doing this. At least on a regular basis. I don't want to rule out once a year 10 CV running at PRGE or something.

#18 LoTonah OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Nov 3, 2018 2:00 AM

Can I use this to make a beowulf cluster of ColecoVisions?   :-D   I hear Crysis is being ported over to the SGM any day now.



#19 Osgeld OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Nov 3, 2018 6:12 PM

Yes a ATX power supply is larger. However with 600 watts one can power a ColecoVision, ADAM, ATARI 130XE, Commodore Amiga , and several other systems at the exact same time. Or power 10 ColecoVision's at the same time if one has 10 cords.

 

 

Why on earth is that a selling point

 

A ATX power supply has a MTBF rating of 100,000+ and is very reliable.

 

 

I dont care about A(n) ATX power supply, whats the fail rate of THIS power supply, that's what matters 



#20 Zonie OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Nov 3, 2018 6:42 PM

$17

 

med_gallery_3653_2233_73120.jpg

https://www.arrow.co...cB&gclsrc=aw.ds



#21 Osgeld OFFLINE  

Osgeld

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  • 5,768 posts
  • Location:Nashville, TN

Posted Sat Nov 3, 2018 6:51 PM

I have had similar models of meanwells (mainly the RT-85 which puts out +12 +24 +5) in industrial equipment, under load 24/7 for almost a decade now, only one "failed" but the supply was actually OK it was the UPS it was connected to

 

and you cant complain about the price



#22 HDTV1080P OFFLINE  

HDTV1080P

    Dragonstomper

  • Topic Starter
  • 756 posts

Posted Sun Nov 4, 2018 7:49 PM

Since ATX power supplies with -5 volts DC are not being made anymore (They also offer more watts, -12 volts DC feature for computers like the Commodore Amiga, and 3.3 volts DC). Choosing a non-ATX power supply like the 50 Watt Mean Well RT-50A becomes the only option for ColecoVision/ADAM owners until someone releases the ColecoVision USB adapter solution.

 

However, I wish Mean Well made an enclosed power supply built in a physical case and with a built in 3 prong AC socket with a on/off switch. There are some companies or individuals that charge around $100 for this Mean Well RT-50A after they put a ADAM cord on the $17 Mean Well power supply and place the power supply in a case.

 

The main reason I like ATX computer power supplies for around $35 with -5 volts DC feature is because they are already enclosed in a case with an on/off switch and a 3 prong AC socket. If Mean Well or another company started doing that for -5 volt DC power supplies then I well be interested in their power supplies.        


Edited by HDTV1080P, Sun Nov 4, 2018 7:55 PM.





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