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LED Mod

LED Mod Atari 2600

9 replies to this topic

#1 Polish.Gasoline OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:09 PM

Hi,

I am trying to build my first mod for my 2600.  It is an LED mod.  I am trying to purchase the parts (not much to them) and am curious what does the led have to be rated for the 2600.  All I know is the 2600 takes .5 A and 9 V.  What does that mean for the LED?  The wire is rated for 24 AWG right?

 

This was the site I was going to order off of.

https://canada.newar...arch?st=led red

 

Thanks in the future if anyone responds.



#2 CPUWIZ OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:33 PM

Simple, tap into ground and 5V, calculate the rating for the LED resistor and solder.  There are calculators online for this.



#3 CPUWIZ OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:34 PM

http://led.linear1.org/1led.wiz



#4 Hannacek OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Dec 13, 2018 12:15 PM

You probably just want to buy parts off Ebay or Amazon. Newark tends to charge too much for shipping if your order is too small. 

 

You just need an led, and the right value resistor for 5 volts. Its a really simple circuit to light an led with 5 volts. You can find youtube videos and stuff online to show you how.  



#5 Osgeld OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Dec 13, 2018 1:01 PM

I use 330 ohm for a red led modern leds even the basic ones are quite bright

Edited by Osgeld, Thu Dec 13, 2018 1:03 PM.


#6 -^CrožBow^- OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Dec 14, 2018 11:43 AM

I use 330 ohm for a red led modern leds even the basic ones are quite bright

Not as cheap a solution, but I've been trying to use 12v LEDs lately. Reason being is that they are designed for 12v but still work with only 5v. But they are much less brighter and more 'Normal' for power LEDs if you ask me. And with them only running on half the rated voltage, they should last quite a bit longer with less fade over time.



#7 Osgeld OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Dec 15, 2018 8:19 AM

that's not how it works 



#8 -^CrožBow^- OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Dec 15, 2018 9:39 AM

that's not how it works 

These already have current limiting resistors installed in the base with a securing nut for easy installation. Just like an RCA jack. 



#9 Osgeld OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Dec 15, 2018 12:16 PM

its the current that matters, so yes if a led is setup for X current at Y voltage with Z resistor then changing any of those values will result in more or less light being produced, but it probably wont effect lifespan as its a diode junction, its either on or its not (until you get into LED's that start producing measurable heat, or your letting too much current pass, which produces heat) 


Edited by Osgeld, Sat Dec 15, 2018 12:17 PM.


#10 -^CrožBow^- OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Dec 15, 2018 12:44 PM

its the current that matters, so yes if a led is setup for X current at Y voltage with Z resistor then changing any of those values will result in more or less light being produced, but it probably wont effect lifespan as its a diode junction, its either on or its not (until you get into LED's that start producing measurable heat, or your letting too much current pass, which produces heat) 

Makes sense. I figured since there was less voltage and likely less current that it might extend the normal life of the LED. It about half as bright as they would normally be at that voltage. But thank you for the correction!







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