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Why is dukes of hazard a prototype???


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#1 homerwannabee OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 2:49 AM

why are dukes of hazard cartridges consider prototypes given the fact that they are roms and were actually in production mode?

#2 Mock OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 5:25 AM

do you feel better now? :roll:

#3 Susuwatari OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 6:44 AM

'll feel better when there's a geniue proto post that actually involves a proto and not just a bragging right to be the first to post. :D

I'd lay my near mint Combat Tempest would be the first to make proto related post here. :D

#4 Tempest OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 7:35 AM

well um why are dukes of hazard cartridges consider prototypes given the fact that they are roms and were actually in production mode?  


Well they're really not. Dukes of Hazzard is technically an unreleased production game. The same goes for Off Your Rocker (which was only released in small quantities after Pleasant Valley Video bought the carts from the label manufacturer).

Some day I'd like to hear the whole story on why Dukes was mass produced but not released. There are still alot of details that remain unknown.

Tempest

#5 Csonicgo OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 3:48 PM

Wow, the first post, and it's spam. Great job. :roll:

#6 Albert OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 3:49 PM

Wow, the first post, and it's spam. Great job. :roll:


If there wasn't a legitimate question attached to it, it would have been quickly nuked.

..Al

#7 Csonicgo OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 3:54 PM

Wow, the first post, and it's spam. Great job. :roll:


If there wasn't a legitimate question attached to it, it would have been quickly nuked.

..Al


nuked...... :|

I had no idea you have that much power...

#8 Brad2600 OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 4:16 PM

I see nothing cool about having the first post in a new forum..especially if it's meant to be spam. Legitimate question or not.

#9 homerwannabee OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 7:39 PM

Ok, Kepone and you had the ask Dr Phil thread.
I did ask a serious question, I still don't really understand why a cart like air raid is not a prototype and a mass produced cartridge like Dukes of Hazard is a prototype. Also what exactly is spam, everyone throws around this word but no one ever tries to define it. I always thought spam was a comercial atempt to email a mass amount of people. If spam is a useless post then post I did was not useless. I will now edit the original post so that maybe this issue may be forgotten.

#10 sku_u OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 8:17 PM

Also what exactly is spam, everyone throws around this word but no one ever tries to define it.  I always thought spam was a comercial atempt to email  a mass amount of people.  If spam is a useless post then post I did was not useless.  I will now edit the original post so that maybe this issue may be forgotten.


There are many forms of spam:

spam    ( P )  Pronunciation Key  (spm)
n.  

Unsolicited e-mail, often of a commercial nature, sent indiscriminately to multiple mailing lists, individuals, or newsgroups; junk e-mail.
tr.v. spammed, spam·ming, spams  

1. To send unsolicited e-mail to.
2. To send (a message) indiscriminately to multiple mailing lists, individuals, or newsgroups.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
[From Spam(probably inspired by a comedy routine on the British television series Monty Python's Flying Circus, in which the word is repeated incessantly).]
[Buy it]
Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Spam    ( P )  Pronunciation Key  (spm)

A trademark used for a canned meat product consisting primarily of chopped pork pressed into a loaf.
[Buy it]
Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

spam

n : (trademark) a tinned luncheon meat made largely from pork [syn: Spam]

Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University

spam


1. (From Hormel's Spiced Ham, via the Monty Python
"Spam" song) To post irrelevant or inappropriate messages to
one or more Usenet newsgroups, mailing lists, or other
messaging system in deliberate or accidental violation of
netiquette.
It is possible to spam a newsgroup with one well- (or ill-)
planned message, e.g. asking "What do you think of abortion?"
on soc.women. This can be done by cross-posting, e.g. any
message which is crossposted to alt.rush-limbaugh and
alt.politics.homosexuality will almost inevitably spam both
groups. (Compare troll and flame bait).
Posting a message to a significant proportion of all
newsgroups is a sure way to spam Usenet and become an object
of almost universal hatred. Canter and Siegel spammed the net
with their Green card post.
If you see an article which you think is a deliberate spam, DO
NOT post a follow-up - doing so will only contribute to the
general annoyance. Send a polite message to the poster by
private e-mail and CC it to "postmaster" at the same address.
Bear in mind that the posting's origin might have been forged
or the apparent sender's account might have been used by
someone else without his permission.
The word was coined as the winning entry in a 1937 competition
to choose a name for Hormel Foods Corporation's "spiced meat"
(now officially known as "SPAM luncheon meat"). Correspondant
Bob White claims the modern use of the term predates Monty
Python by at least ten years. He cites an editor for the
Dallas Times Herald describing Public Relations as "throwing a
can of spam into an electric fan just to see if any of it
would stick to the unwary passersby."
Usenet newsgroup: news:news.admin.net-abuse.
See also netiquette.
2. (A narrowing of sense 1, above) To indiscriminately send
large amounts of unsolicited e-mail meant to promote a
product or service. Spam in this sense is sort of like the
electronic equivalent of junk mail sent to "Occupant".
In the 1990s, with the rise in commercial awareness of the
net, there are actually scumbags who offer spamming as a
"service" to companies wishing to advertise on the net. They
do this by mailing to collections of e-mail addresses,
Usenet news, or mailing lists. Such practises have caused
outrage and aggressive reaction by many net users against the
individuals concerned.
3. (Apparently a generalisation of sense 2, above) To abuse
any network service or tool by for promotional purposes.
"AltaVista is an index, not a promotional tool. Attempts to
fill it with promotional material lower the value of the index
for everyone. [...] We will disallow URL submissions from
those who spam the index. In extreme cases, we will exclude
all their pages from the index." -- Altavista.
4. To crash a program by overrunning a
fixed-size buffer with excessively large input data.
See also buffer overflow, overrun screw, smash the stack.
5. (A narrowing of sense 1, above) To flood any
chat forum or Internet game with purposefully annoying
text or macros. Compare Scrolling.
(2003-09-21)

Source: The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © 1993-2003 Denis Howe

spam

vt.,vi.,n. [from "Monty Python's Flying Circus"] 1. To
crash a program by overrunning a fixed-size buffer with excessively
large input data. See also buffer overflow, overrun screw,
smash the stack. 2. To cause a newsgroup to be flooded with
irrelevant or inappropriate messages. You can spam a newsgroup with
as little as one well- (or ill-) planned message (e.g. asking "What
do you think of abortion?" on soc.women). This is often done with
cross-posting (e.g. any message which is crossposted to
alt.rush-limbaugh and alt.politics.homosexuality will almost
inevitably spam both groups). This overlaps with troll behavior;
the latter more specific term has become more common. 3. To send many
identical or nearly-identical messages separately to a large number
of Usenet newsgroups. This is more specifically called `ECP',
Excessive Cross-Posting. This is one sure way to infuriate nearly
everyone on the Net. See also velveeta and jello. 4. To bombard
a newsgroup with multiple copies of a message. This is more
specifically called `EMP', Excessive Multi-Posting. 5. To
mass-mail unrequested identical or nearly-identical email messages,
particularly those containing advertising. Especially used when the
mail addresses have been culled from network traffic or databases
without the consent of the recipients. Synonyms include UCE,
UBE. 6. Any large, annoying, quantity of output. For instance,
someone on IRC who walks away from their screen and comes back to
find 200 lines of text might say "Oh no, spam".
The later definitions have become much more prevalent as the
Internet has opened up to non-techies, and to most people senses 3 4
and 5 are now primary. All three behaviors are considered abuse of
the net, and are almost universally grounds for termination of the
originator's email account or network connection. In these senses
the term `spam' has gone mainstream, though without its original
sense or folkloric freight - there is apparently a widespread myth
among lusers that "spamming" is what happens when you dump cans of
Spam into a revolving fan.

Source: Jargon File 4.2.0



#11 Brad2600 OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 8:18 PM

Nah. Please don't take me too seriously. You have a legitimate question.

:)

#12 StanJr OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 10:20 PM

Which Dukes are we talking about, the Stunt Cycle-esque one, or the one that is more like a car adventure game?

#13 CPUWIZ OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Jan 8, 2004 10:21 PM

The 16K version, not the one that Stunt Cycle is a hack of. :)

#14 slapdash OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Jan 9, 2004 5:50 PM

Dukes of Hazzard is technically an unreleased production game.

Some day I'd like to hear the whole story on why Dukes was mass produced but not released.  There are still alot of details that remain unknown.


Heh... See my note in the Terminology thread...




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