AtariAge Logo Section Icon
  Have You Played Atari Today? 2600|5200|7800|Lynx|Jaguar|Forums|Store  
Title:

System:

Region:

Championship Soccer - Atari 2600 - Atari    Manual Scan icon HTML Manual   

Championship Soccer manual - Atari Age

CHAMPIONSHIP SOCCER

ATARI GAME PROGRAM INSTRUCTIONS

This Game Program ™ is personally endorsed by Pele’

MODEL CX2616

 

MEET THE ATARI® COMPUTER SOCCER TEAM

Section 1

COMPLETE GAME PLAY INSTRUCTIONS

Sections 2-7

GAME STRATEGY

Section 8

DRILLS AND PRACTICE

Section 9

 

Use your Joystick Controllers with this ATARI® Game Program ™. Be sure the controllers are firmly plugged into the LEFT and RIGHT CONTROLLER jacks at the rear of your ATARI Video Computer System ™. Hold the Joystick with the red button to your upper left toward the television screen.

For one-player games, use the controller plugged into the LEFT CONTROLLER jack. See section 3 of your Video Computer System Owner’s Manual for details.  

NOTE: Always turn the console power switch off when inserting or removing a Game Program. This will protect the electronic components and prolong the life of your ATARI Video Computer System.                        © 1980 ATARI, INC.

 

(PAGE 1)

CONTENTS

1. MEET THE ATARI COMPUTER SOCCER TEAM

2

7. BALL CONTROL

 

                                                                               

 

Dribbling

11

2. CHOOSING A GAME

 

Kicking                                    

11

Reading the GAME SELECT MATRIX        

4

The Toe Kick            

12

Selecting the Game Number                         

5

8. GAME STRATEGY

 

                                               

 

Maintaining Control Over the Ball

13

3. HOW TO PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP SOCCER

 

Kicking a Goal                           

13

Object of the Game                                                     

5

Defending Your Goal

14

Team Moves             

5

Turning the Play Around             

14

Ball Skills                                                

6

Scoring a Goal on a Corner Kick

14

The Referee                               

6

                               

 

The Clock

6

9. DRILLS AND PRACTICE

 

The Opening Kickoff                   

7

Dribbling and Passing                 

15

The Play                   

7

Kicking a Goal                                           

15

Scoring                     

7

Defending the Goal                     

15

The Second Half                         

8

               

 

                               

 

10. GAME SELECT MATRIX                  

 

4. LIMITS OF TEAM PLAY

 

 

 

Horizontal Limits                       

8

ILLUSTRATIONS                   

 

Vertical Limits

8

Figure

 

                               

 

1. Game Number Counter                            

5

5. OUT-OF-BOUNDS PENALTY PLAYS

 

2. Scoreboard and Clock

5

The Throw-In                            

9

3. Using the Joystick Controller                    

6

The Goal Line Kick                                    

9

4. The Kickoff

7

The Corner Kick        

10

5. Scoring a Goal

8

                               

 

6. The Throw-In                         

9

6. CONSOLE CONTROLS

 

7. Goal Line Kick

9

Game Select Switch

10

8. The Corner Kick

10

Game Reset Switch

10

9. Trapping the Ball

11

Difficulty Switches

11

10. The Toe Kick

12

TV Type Switch

11

11. The Forward Attack

13

 

 

12. The Back Attack

13

 

 

13. The Relay Zig-Zag Attack

14

                                               

 

14. Scoring a Goal on a Corner Kick            

15

                                                                                                                 

(PAGES 2&3)

1. MEET THE ATARI COMPUTER SOCCER TEAM

Okay, soccer fans, the ATARI CHAMPIONSHIP SOCCER ™ Team challenges you to a game. The ATARI computer team is waiting impatiently inside your Game Program cartridge for you to select one of the single player games (Games 28 through 54). They want to show you their stuff. Here’s a brief rundown on each player, just so you’ll know who you’re up against.

 "CRASH" MORGAN, the galloping goalie, is the fastest man on the team. "CRASH" got his nickname because he is forever slamming into the goal posts chasing after the ball. Fortunately, the goal posts are never damaged, but sometimes you can score a goal on him before his ears stop ringing.

NICK DANGER, the frantic forward, is mean and nasty and just loves to blast the ball into your goal shouting, "eat leather, chump." Don’t let his bad manners bother you, it’s just his way of rattling the opposition.

"LUMPY" DURAN, the left back, is without a doubt the clumsiest player in the world of soccer. Penalized twice for stepping on the ball instead of kicking it, he was finally thrown out of one game for toe-kicking the referee!

ALEXIE PUTSNOWSKI (Putsy), the right back. What can we say about Putsy? A real ladies man, a great soccer player, a sore loser. Even though "The Puts" has kicked and gouged his way to soccer stardom, for three years in a row he has been voted the "least likely" player.

  

(PAGE 4)

2. CHOOSING A GAME

Reading the GAME SELECT MATRIX

Select your game number from the GAME SELECT MATRIX (Section 10). The matrix describes each of the 54 games in CHAMPIONSHIP SOCCER. Games 1 through 27 are two-player games. Games28 through 54 are single-player games against the computer.

Two-player Games. The GAME SELECT MATRIX describes two-player games in terms of how fast the teams move (Team Speed), how wide the goals are (Goal Size), and what the out-of-bounds penalties are (Penalties) if penalties apply.

Some two-player games have no out-of-bounds penalties (Penalties N in the GAME SELECT MATRIX). In these games the ball rebounds from boundaries (sidelines and goal lines). In other two-player games the ball rebounds from goal lines but there is a penalty if the ball crosses a sideline (Penalties S). In the remaining two-player games there are penalties if the ball crosses either a sideline or a goal line (Penalties SG). For a description of the penalty plays, see Section 5-OUT-OF-BOUNDS PENALTY PLAYS.

The easiest two-player game is Game 1. The teams move slowly (S), there are no penalties (N), and the goals are large (L). The most difficult two-player game is probably Game 27, with fast teams (F), out-of-bounds penalties (SG), and small goals (S).

Single-player Games. There are no penalties in single-player games. The GAME SELECT MATRIX describes the games in terms of how fast the teams move (Team Speed), how wide the goals are (Goal Size), and how hard the computer is to beat (Computer Difficulty). Game 28 is probably the easiest single-player game, since team speed is slow (S), the computer is easy to beat (E), and the goals are large (L). Game 54 is the hardest. Teams move fast (F), the computer is difficult to beat (D), and goals are small (S).

 

(PAGE 5)

Selecting the Game Number            

Once you have selected your game from the GAME SELECT MATRIX, press down the game select switch on your ATARI Video Computer System until the game number comes up on the game number counter. The counter is at top left of your television screen (see Figure 1).

(game screen)

Figure 1. Game Number Counter

NOTE: To advance the game numbers faster, hold the game reset switch down together with the game select switch.

 

3. HOW TO PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP SOCCER

Object of the Game

The object is to score points by kicking the ball into your opponent’s goal. One point is scored for each goal. The scores are shown at the top of your television screen. The left player’s score is at top left; the right player’s score, or the computer’s score, is at top right (see Figure 2).

(game screen)

Figure 2. Scoreboard and Clock

Team Moves

Each team consists of three fielders (a Forward and two

(PAGE 6)

Backs) and a goalkeeper. The fielders are controlled by the Joystick and always move together in whatever direction you move the Joystick: up, down, right, left, or diagonally (see Figure 3).

(joystick diagram)

Figure 3. Using the Joystick Controller

 

The goalkeeper moves from side to side within his goal area. While the ball is in play, the computer moves the goalkeeper and keps him in front of the ball. You can make him move faster by moving your Joystick left and right. When the goalkeeper takes possession of the ball, you control his moves with the Joystick.

Ball Skills

Specific ball skills are described in Section 7-BALL CONTROL. In general, use the Joystick to direct the ball; press the red button to pass and kick the ball. See Section 8-GAME STRATEGY for offensive and defensive plays.

NOTE: Some people say they can move the teams more easily and react faster if they keep their right thumb on the Joystick and their left thumb on the red button. This technique might work for you too.

The Referee

The black lines you see on the left side of your television screen are the referee and the linesmen who assist him (see Figure 4). The referee blows the whistle to start and stop play and positions the ball for kickoffs and penalty plays.

The Clock

A game of CHAMPIONSHIP SOCCER ias played in two halves. A half lasts from 3 to 5 minutes, depending on the Team Speed of the game you select. The clock at top center of your television screen (see Figure 2) starts counting downthe seconds to the end of the first half when you press downthe game reset switch on your ATARI Video Computer System.

There is no time-out between halves. As soon as the clock counts down the first half, it resets and starts countingdown the second half. The referee’s whistle signals both the end of the first half and the start of the second.

 

(PAGE 7)

(game screen)

Figure 4. The Kickoff

The Opening Kickoff

At the start of the game, the ball is placed on the centerspot and the two teams line upon either side of the centerline (see Figure 4). The Red team(or dark team if your game is inblack-and-white) is controlled by the left Joystick. The Blue team (or light team) is controlled by the right Joystick in two-player games and by the computer in single-player games.

NOTE: The team colors may vary with the color settings of your television set. For example, the Red team may appear to be orange or pink.

The Forward of the Red team kicks off. The kickoff is a kick backward to one of the team Backs. Move the left Joystick diagonally back left or right to make the kickoff (see Figure 4). You do not need to press the red button to make a kickoff, but you can kick faster if you move the Joystick and then quickly press the button.

The Play

After the opening kickoff the Red team (the attacking team) dribbles and kicks the ball toward the Blue team’s goal. The Blue team (the defending team) attempts to steal the ball and attack the Red team’s goal. In CHAMPIONSHIP SOCCER the defending team has an advantage because it moves faster than the attacking team.

When an attacking team is within range of the opponent’s goal, the attackers attempt to kick the ball past the goalkeeper into the goal. If the goalkeeper catches the ball and blocks the kick, he attempts to kick the ball upfield to a teammate. The attackers try to intercept and make their goal.

Scoring

To score a goal you must kick the ball completely into the goal, as shown in Figure 5. The ball cannot touch the goal line or stop partway into the goal.

(PAGE 8)

(2 game screens)

Figure 5. Scoring a Goal

NOTE: If the ball stops on the goal line in front of the goal or partway into the goal, the goalkeeper will "trap" it (gather the ball in).

When a team makes a goal and scores a point, the ball is placed on the center spot, and the Forward of the team that did not score kicks off to one of the team Backs. The play continues until the clock runs out and the first half ends.

The Second Half

At the half the teams switch sides. The Forward of the Blue team (light-colored team) kicks off to one of the team Backs to start the play.

 

4. LIMITS OF TEAM PLAY

Horizontal Limits

If your Forward is playing the ball close to a sideline, one of your Backs will be over the sideline. This is perfectly legal in all games, including games with sidelines out of bounds.

Vertical Limits

Teams can approach the goal line close enough to trap the ball but they cannot cross the goal lines.

  

(PAGE 9)

5. OUT-OF-BOUNDS PENALTY PLAYS

Each time an out-of-bounds infraction takes place, the referee blows his whistle. The team against which the penalty is called then flashes as a sign that it forfeits the ball and cannot touch it. One of three penalty plays results: The Throw-In, The Goal Line Kick, or The Corner Kick.

The Throw-In

The Throw-In penalty play results when a team drives the ball over a sideline. At the point the ball went out of bounds, it is thrown in to a fielder on the other team. To receive a throw-in, carefully move your receiver up to the ball and barely touch it (see Figure 6). The ball will jump from the sideline and your receiver will trap it. The ball is back in play as soon as the throw-in is completed.

 

(game screen)

Figure 6. The Throw-In

The Goal Line Kick

When an attacking team maneuvers the ball over the defending team’s goal line, the referee calls a penalty against the attacking team. The referee places the ball on the goal line in front of the defending team’s goalkeeper, and the goalkeeper traps the ball (see Figure 7). He then kicks it upfield to a teammate. The kick can be intercepted by the attacking team, since the ball is back in play as soon as the goalkeeper kicks it.

 

(game screen)

Figure 7. Goal Line Kick

 

(PAGE 10)

The Corner Kick

If the defending team maneuvers the ball outside its own goal line, the referee calls a penalty against the defending team. The referee places the ball in the corner close to the defending team’s goal, and the attacking team kicks it upfield to a teammate. The defending team cannot intercept the ball until after the attacking team has touched it or it has rolled to a stop.

To make the corner kick, position the attacking team to receive the ball, then press the button on your Joystick. The ball will sail out of the corner at a 45-degree angle as long as you hold the button in. If you release the button, the ball will cut across in front of the goal line, at which time you can attempt to kick a goal (see Figure 8). For tips on how to score on a corner kick, see Section 8-GAME STRATEGY.

 

(game screen)

Figure 8. The Corner Kick

 

6. CONSOLE CONTROLS

Game Select Switch

Use the game select switch to select the game number. The game number appears at the top left of your television screen. The number at the top right tells you whether the game is for one or two players.

See Section 10-GAME SELECT MATRIX for a breakdown of the 54 games in CHAMPIONSHIP SOCCER.

Game Reset Switch

Use the game reset switch to start or restart a game.

 

(PAGE 11)

Difficulty Switches

Games are normally played with the left and right difficulty switches set to b. However, if you want to give yourself a handicap, set your difficulty switch to a. This will enlarge your goal, making it harder for you to defend and easier for your opponent to penetrate. If you have the right Joystick, set the right difficulty switch to a. If you have the left Joystick, set the left difficulty switch to a.

TV Type Switch

Set this switch to color if you have a color television set. Set it to b-w to play the game in black-and-white.

 

7. BALL CONTROL

Dribbling

Dribbling is controlled with the Joystick. Move your team up to the ball until one of your fielders traps it (see Figure 9). Then quickly move your Joystick in the direction you want the ball to go. The ball will move a short distance and stop, unless it is intercepted before it stops.

(player diagram)

Figure 9. Trapping the Ball

IMPORTANT REMINDER: When sending your fielders after the ball, remember that you can touch the ball and immediately take off in any direction. You do not have to go around the ball to establish the direction you next want to move. Think of it as "touch and go".

Kicking

To kick the ball after your player traps it, move your Joystick in the direction you want the ball to go and press the red

(PAGE 12)

button. The longer you hold the button in, the longer the kick will be. To avoid kicking the ball in the wrong direction, always move the Joystick before you press the button. If you press the button without moving the Joystick, the ball will be kicked straight upfield or straight downfield, depending uopn whether your player is above or below the ball when he kicks it.

 

Toe Kick

The toe kick is fast and powerful and is therefore the most effective way to drive the ball toward the goal. This kick extends your trapping range, as shown in Figure 10, and moves the ball downfield very fast. It enables you to out-distance the defending team and keep control of the ball.

 

(player diagram)

Figure 10. The Toe Kick

To execute a toe kick, move your player within leg range of the ball, push the Joystick in the direction you want the ball to go, and press the button. You can use the tow kick while your team is moving crossfield as well as when it is moving upfield or downfield.

The toe kick is the best way to kick a goal. If you combine the toe kick with some goal attack strategy, you may become unbeatable. See Section 8-GAME STRATEGY for some tips on effective goal attacks.

 

(PAGE 13)

8. GAME STRATEGY

Maintaining Control Over the Ball

When your team is attacking, you should use evasive moves to keep control of the ball. Pass the ball from player to player and dodge and weave around the defending players to prevent the defending team from stealing the ball. Since the defending team moves faster than the attacking team, it can easily intercept the ball if the ball is simply dribbled and kicked straight down the field toward the goal. Some exercises to improve dribbling, passing, kicking and other game skills are given in Section 9-DRILLS AND PRACTICE.

Kicking a Goal

A straight kick into the goal will almost always be blocked, since the goalkeeper is always in front of the ball. You will have more success if you position your fielders for a diagonal kick. There are many ways to set up a diagonal kick, but the following three plays are particularly hard to defend against because of the element of surprise.

The Forward Attack (Figure 11). The team is centered and reasonably close to the goal. The forward is in position to kick the ball either diagonally right or diagonally left into the goal.

(game screen)

Figure 11. The Forward Attack

 

The Back Attack (Figure 12). The team is positioned close to the goal and off to one side of it. The Back is centered and in position to kick the ball diagonally into the goal.

(game screen)

Figure 12. The Back Attack

 

 

(PAGE 14)

The Relay Zig-Zag (Figure 13). The team is in position for the Back Attack. The Back kicks the ball on a diagonal to the Forward, who kicks it on the opposite diagonal into the goal.

(game screen)

Figure 13. The Relay Zig-Zag Attack

 

Defending Your Goal

The trick of an effective goal defense is to shift your attention from your fielders to your goalkeeper. Position your fielders so that they can harass the attackers and help block goal kicks, but keep your eye on the ball and concentrate on your goalkeeper. Use your Joystick to increase the speed of his moves within the goal area.

Turning the Play Around

Even when you are fighting to defend your goal and your attention is on your goalkeeper, be alert for a chance to steal the ball. If you can steal it, pass it to your goalkeeper. Remember that as long as he has the ball, you control the play. Resist the temptation to kick the ball out to one of your fielders until you find the right opportunity. Back your fielders away from the goal line, dodge the attackers, and look for a chance to kick the ball to a fielder who can move out fast. If you are skilled enough, you can drive the ball out to the centerline before the other team can catch you.

Scoring a Goal on a Corner Kick

There are lots of ways to score a goal on a corner kick. This is just one example. In all plays of this sort, success depends upon position, speed, and surprise.

Center your Forward as if you were going to make a Forward Attack on your opponent’s goal. Press and hold in the button on your Joystick. As explained previously, the ball will fly out of the corner at a 45-degree angle. Quickly release the button, and the ball will cut across the goal line.

 

(PAGE 15)

When the ball passes in front of your receiver, press the button on your Joystick and make a diagonal toe kick into the goal (see Figure 14).

 

(game screen)

Figure 13. The Relay Zig-Zag Attack

 

It takes a lot of practice to become a skilled CHAMPIONSHIP SOCCER player. Here are some drills to improve your game:

  

9. DRILLS AND PRACTICE

Dribbling and Passing

Play against the computer at a slower speed than you are used to and practice evasive dribbling and passing.

Kicking a Goal

Play one of the two-player games by yourself. Practice dribbling up to the goal and executing various goal kicks that you set up. Practice using the toe kick to kick goals.

Defending the Goal

Play against the computer at a skill level above your own. Keep the ball in your territory, and the computer will give you plenty of practice in defending your goal.

 

(PAGE 16)

10. GAME SELECT MATRIX

HOW TO READ THE GAME SELECT MATRIX

Team Speed:

S = slow

M = moderately fast

F = fast

Penalties:

N = no penalties, sidelines and gola lines rebound the ball

S = penalty if ball goes over the sidelines

SG = penalty if ball goes over sidelines or goal lines

Goal Size:

L = large

M = medium

S = small

Computer Difficulty:

E = easy

M = moderately difficult

D = difficult

NOTE: No matter what level of computer difficulty you choose, if your score is higher than the computer’s, the computer becomes harder to beat. If the computer’s score is higher, the computer becomes easier to beat.

Game Time: Game time depends upon the team speed selected:

Team Speed

Game Time (minutes per half)

S

3

M

4

F

5

 

GAME MATRIX

Two-Player Game No.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Team Speed

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

M

M

M

M

M

M

Penalties

N

N

N

S

S

S

SG

SG

SG

N

N

N

S

S

S

Goal Size

L

M

S

L

M

S

L

M

S

L

M

S

L

M

S

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two-Player Game No.

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

 

 

 

Team Speed

M

M

M

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

 

 

 

Penalties

SG

SG

SG

N

N

N

S

S

S

SG

SG

SG

 

 

 

Goal Size

L

M

S

L

M

S

L

M

S

L

M

S

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Single-Player Game No.

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

 

 

 

Team Speed

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

M

M

M

 

 

 

Computer Difficulty

E

E

E

M

M

M

D

D

D

E

E

E

 

 

 

Goal Size

L

M

S

L

M

S

L

M

S

L

M

S

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Single-Player Game No.

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

Team Speed

M

M

M

M

M

M

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

Computer Difficulty

M

M

M

D

D

D

E

E

E

M

M

M

D

D

D

Goal Size

L

M

S

L

M

S

L

M

S

L

M

S

L

M

S

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: In single-player games, sidelines and goal lines rebound the ball.

ATARI®

W A Warner Communications Company

ATARI, INC., Consumer Division

P.O. Box 427, Sunnyvale, CA 94086

C011402-16 REV.1

Printed in U.S.A.

Transcribed May, 2000 by Dan Cage for www.Atari Age.com

Untitled Document