Jump to content
  • entries
    4
  • comments
    23
  • views
    7,260

BurgerTime Remake: Opening up the project to the Community

splendidnut

1,357 views

Sorry about the lack of updates; I got distracted by a trail of other things: acquiring an Atari 5200 and games, working on the house, dealing with fleas in the basement, etc. Basically real life really snuck up on me and turned my attention towards other things. So I've decided to open up the project to the community for those who wish to collaborate and hopefully help drive this project to be completed sooner. :)

So how can you help? I could really use help on the game logic... I know this project is in assembly language... but if someone could create a crude demo of the game in Batari Basic that implemented the actual game logic, it would give me something to work off of.

There are definitely other areas (music, character graphics, etc.) that I could use help in too.

One of the big reasons I want to open up this project is incase there is someone out there more motivated than me to drive the project home sooner :)

I just recently switched it from using DPC to DPC+ because I have some ideas on how to harness the more advance features to take care of some of the issues I'm having now with not having enough cycles while drawing to really make the playfield usable.


Oh... if anybody wants to give input on the name... I'm torn between calling this project ChaosGriller or ChaoticGrill.


Sorry if this seems like just a quick update, but I really wanted to just get this out there.



4 Comments


Recommended Comments

Awesome! I am one of those that actually liked M-Network's efforts, so a better version has me very excited. I loved how only the hotdog would straight persue you. That is until you finished all five screens. Then the breadstick would join the hotdog in aggressive tactics. All that really means is they don't turn at every ladder.

Share this comment


Link to comment

M-Network (Ron Surratt, specifically) actually did a really good job with it. The display engine of the original was as crammed as it could be. The extra RAM they had in the cartridge was used for storing the game variables since the main RAM in the Atari was almost completely used by the display engine; mainly for the burgers. The extra RAM/bankswitching also made it easy to make it a two player game. There really was no way they could make it better at the time.

 

My original idea was to finesse their engine, but that would have been way too much work. I started without using any special bankswitching, but soon gave up and switched to using DPC. Which worked for the most part, but didn't quite have the power needed for really improving the burgers. To display the burgers with differentiating colors requires 8 TIA updates per burger display line. With DPC handling the sprites, I had something working that just fit within a display line and updated at least the colors (4 of the 8 TIA updates). I didn't have enough time left to also update the playfield display of the burgers for showing them being knocked by the Chef.

 

If I really wanted to, I probably could have come up with some way to do it... I had that bouncing around in the back of my mind since August... but then November came around and nothing had come to me, so I had to come up with some other idea.

 

I started digging around and hit upon the DPC+ Demo. I remember reading about the bus-stuffing capabilities back during the summer. It sounded cool... then when I saw the demos, it really hit me how much power it would give me. One of the big benefits outside of the 10 cycle TIA writes was the ability to write back to display RAM... which should give me everything I need to really make it work and look good. Maybe even make the burger pieces look like real pieces on the level.

Share this comment


Link to comment

I started digging around and hit upon the DPC+ Demo. I remember reading about the bus-stuffing capabilities back during the summer. It sounded cool... then when I saw the demos, it really hit me how much power it would give me. One of the big benefits outside of the 10 cycle TIA writes was the ability to write back to display RAM... which should give me everything I need to really make it work and look good. Maybe even make the burger pieces look like real pieces on the level.

In DPC you can update a TIA register in 7 cycles:

  LDA DF0DATA ; 4
  STA GRP0 ; 3

In DPC+ we added an immediate mode override, called Fast Fetch, that lets you do the same in 5 cycles:

  LDA #<DF0DATA ; 2
  STA GRP0 ; 3

Bus Stuffing would override a store to zero page, for a 3 cycle update, like this:

  STY GRP0 ; 3 

DPC+ doesn't use bus stuffing. For more info on that check these two topics:

Share this comment


Link to comment

Ah yes... Fast Fetching not "bus stuffing"... Fast Fetch overrides the immediate load by substituting the value being passed from the Harmony memory to the CPU (6507); whereas, bus stuffing overrides the data sent from the CPU (6507) to the Atari 2600 TIA chip.

 

And to clarify, by 10 cycle TIA writes I meant 10 cycles to write both color and PF data. :)

 

Thanks for catching that SpiceWare.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Guest
Add a comment...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...