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Monitor Controls All, ThinCade: (part 5)

pboland

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Keep in mind, though the cost is fairly low for the parts, much of my time and energy went into research for the most efficient (i.e. cost effective) way to connect and power everything. I really didn’t want a bunch of different power supplies for all the different piece of the build.

The monitor is the key to the whole system. The main reason I decided on the Dell monitor was because of the built in USB powered hub and the 12 volt DC supply output (designed by Dell to power your speaker system).

The 12 volt DC supply powers the audio amplifier and the lights on the coin mech. The USB hub is used to not only connect the data paths between the PI, Audio card, and Joystick interface, but it is also used to power the PI itself.

Both the 12 volts and the power to the USB hub are switched on/off by the power switch on the monitor.

It is this set-up that I will use for all of the arcade games that I build.

To better illustrate this I’ve made this diagram:

blogentry-9874-0-54211300-1552190625_thumb.jpg



More to come soon...



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How much power can you sink from that 12V output? I've a few of those same monitors (rescued from work), but I don't know if that 12V or USB is beefy enough to power a RPi3.

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I'm not really sure. I just know that it works with the set-up I show above.

 

I know my test rig uses a Pi2 and I'm powering it via the USB hub on the monitor with no problems, but I'm not using the 12 volt output from the monitor at the same time (meaning on my test rig).

 

I hope that helps.

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I am fairly certain you can connect the arcade controls directly to the RPi GPIO headers and use the built-in audio jacks instead of the USB dongle.

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I am fairly certain you can connect the arcade controls directly to the RPi GPIO headers and use the built-in audio jacks instead of the USB dongle.

Yes, you can do that. Keep in mind that I'm using a PI/zero which has no built in audio jacks. It is possible to get sound from the header but (needs to be set in the base code) it's noisy and support circuit is necessary for cleaner audio. It was much easier to just use the $0.99 usb audio dongle. As for the controls the USB interface is just easier to deal with as the GPIO header would need to be programed to and the USB device is pretty much plug and play and at $7.00 isn't that costly.

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