Jump to content

Chronogamer

  • entries
    228
  • comments
    1,079
  • views
    427,642

Casino I (APF M1000, 1978)

Mezrabad

1,217 views

Okay, I'm back with all my chronogaming equipment and ready to do this whole chronogaming thing again. Yes, time in general has moved forward in my absence, but I'm still stuck in good 'ol 1979, looking at the APF games from 1978 that I missed the first time through. (Or was it my second time, since technically I lived through 1978 before)

 

Today, we're looking at the one I thought I might never see and regret for the rest of my life. I'm fairly prone to "stress" and "regret" dreams. Though definitely more the former than the latter. Lately, I've been doing a lot of studying for a class I'm taking (Federal Tax Accounting, whee.) and last night I had those horrific school related-acheivment dreams where you find out about a class you've never attended or you're naked in a class you've never attended or you're naked taking the final exam in a class you've never attended, etc.

 

So, my worry was that after doing this chronogaming for 30 years or so I'd be waking up screaming: "Slots!! I never played Slots on the APF M1000!!"

 

Not that I'm a big slots fan, but the slogan is "every game. chronologically" and, well, you know, if I didn't do slots, then I wouldn't have done every game. (Yeah, I know, I'll probably never do Bingo for the RCA Studio II. Boo-fucking-hoo. I'm over it.)

 

Casino I: Roulette / Keno / Slots (APF M1000, 1978)

 

 

 

EDIT: I came up with a pithy way to sum up this cart.

 

These games all rely on luck, however if you happen to be playing them, you don't have any. /EDIT

 

Roulette was attempted for the Magnavox Odyssey waaaay back in 1972, six years ago on the chronology. I hated it. Really.

 

On the APF, I also hate it, but it is a kinder, gentler, less italicized hate.

 

First let's look at presentation, which you will be able to do when I post a screenshot. I'll just talk about it, for now. The presentation is good. You've got your little bank at the bottom from which you place bets, you've got the mainboard on which you may place bets from 1 to 9 and the side boards which take bets up to 99.

 

 

 

Placing bets is strange. You move your marker around, left to right only, until you're at your bet and you input your amount. The amount doesn't show up on screen while you input, nor are there any audio cues to indicate you're inputting anything. You just hit "5", hit "enter" (or "fire") and a "5" will show up under the position you're betting on.

 

There may be a limit to how many bets you may place, but I didn't find it. I placed 12 before I felt I was just pissing my life away and had to stop.

 

Payouts are simple, 2 to 1, 3 to 1 or 36 to 1. This is a two player game, by the way, and both players may place their bets simultaneously! That's a nice feature, as proceedings would seem to strech interminably if it weren't there.

 

When you "spin" the wheel the number indicator goes through a bunch of numbers randomly for about 12 seconds and when the number comes up, all the winning points on the main board are marked. It's actually pretty spiffy.

 

The problem is: it's still Roulette! I just can't get excited gambling in such an abstract manner for merely a score! I can't see that there is any skill involved; I can't see any "clever" bets that will improve one's odds! It's neither a puzzle, nor a game and it is as fun as flipping a coin except there's even less money involved.

 

post-2163-1111743845_thumb.jpg

 

Keno is a new game (EDIT: by new, I mean, new to videogame-land), in fact, I'm tempted to say that it's an APF exclusive! You've got a Keno board with 80 numbers. You pick 2 to 15 numbers (out of 80), (your co-player may also choose numbers). When ready, you pull down your stick, the computer clears the Keno board and picks 20 numbers of its own (out of 80). If your numbers come up ... you win! You start with $100.00. Each time you play a group of numbers it costs $.70. The amount you win varies depending on how many numbers you've chosen vs. how many numbers you've chosen that the computer pulls up. With one number chosen and chosen correctly the payout was $2.10. (though I thought you had to pick between 2 and 15, mistake in the manual?) When I picked 5 out of 8 correctly I won $1.40. Kids, you can do the math for this at home, if you want, I'm mathmatically paralyzed by not caring.

 

 

 

The presentation is good enough, as you see in the screen shot; the Keno "board" is shaped like one. There's an area for your picks below it. Everything moves quickly enough, for Keno, I just see no draw for this game. I just can't imagine people designing this game, based on a real Vegas game, I'm told, and thinking there would be people who would enjoy it. Buy it? Maybe. Enjoy it? No way.

 

Slots. Slots is awful. You can't choose the amount of your bet. You just pull back on your stick and the machine goes. The noise produced by the slots, um, slotting, is unpleasant. The graphics are fairly colorful, but as representations of icons found in a slot machine, they're a little hard to identify, though not impossible. The horror is that you just pull back on your stick, you lose a coin from your bank, the slots "whir" and you either get a payout, or you don't. I just don't get it. Two players get separate banks but have to take turns pulling their respective stick. What the heck is up with that?

 

 

 

You can only win 2 coins (one cherry) or 5 coins (two cherries). If you're very lucky, you can get three gold rings (or lemons, not certain) and win 10 coins. If you're even luckier, you'll lose power before you lose 40 minutes of your life trying to find out if there's a "jackpot" or something. If there is, 40 minutes is too long to wait to find out, but I'm certain that, eventually, you can win more "money" for other sets of three; I just never saw them.

 

 

 

Now I can lay this little obsession to rest and I am happy about it, despite how unenjoyable Casino I is. See, "enjoyable" isn't really the point of this whole exercise, is it? No, it's merely indulging an obsessive compulsion. :)

 

Of course, 20 years from now, I'll wake up screaming: "Slots!! Oh, god, I played APF SLOTS!!! *sob*"

 

Next entry we'll do another APF gem, I think we'll try Backgammon. I have the instruction booklet for this one, too, so I'm a little excited.

  • Like 1


12 Comments


Recommended Comments

One of the interesting facts about Roulette is the house percantage is the same for every bet, other than the 5-number bet on wheels with both 0 and 00 - when it's worse. Although it makes sense, if you bet both black and red you will break even unless the wheel comes up 0 (or 00). The lure of Roulette is the 36:1 payout if you bet on the right number.

 

Keno is the grandfather of the N of M lotteries. Again, the only reason it's interesting to play is the high payout against long odds. Same goes for slots.

Share this comment


Link to comment

One of the interesting facts about Roulette is the house percantage is the same for every bet, other than the 5-number bet on wheels with both 0 and 00 - when it's worse. Although it makes sense, if you bet both black and red you will break even unless the wheel comes up 0 (or 00). The lure of Roulette is the 36:1 payout if you bet on the right number.

 

Keno is the grandfather of the N of M lotteries. Again, the only reason it's interesting to play is the high payout against long odds. Same goes for slots.

 

That is interesting, and I can see how it would be interesting with real money on the line, to a point. My family and I recently went to a race track. Betting on the horses was pretty fun, but they'd recently added a slot machine room, through which we were not allowed to waltz with our children in tow. My wife did go through later and said she'd seen zombies in movies that were more animated than the people playing those machines.

 

What does the "N of M" mean?

Share this comment


Link to comment
One of the interesting facts about Roulette is the house percantage is the same for every bet...

 

From what I understand, that isn't true in Monte Carlo, or at least hasn't been historically. If the "0" comes up (there's only one), all bets are marked as "imprisoned". If the next spin of the wheel is one that should pay off, the bettor's money is returned.

 

Thus, if you put $360 on "red" and the wheel hits "0", your bet would be effectively reduced to $180 (since if you win, you'll only get $360 back instead of $720). If you'd put the $360 on "1-12" and the wheel hit "0", your bet would be effectively reduced to $120 (since if you win, you'll get back $360 instead of $1080). And if you'd put it on "7", your bet would be effectively reduced to $10 (your winning would be $360 instead of $12,960).

 

BTW, craps is a somewhat interesting game. Not that there are any plays which offer better than 100% payout, but some actually come extremely close. As a trap for the unwary, though, there are some bets that may be placed several ways with different payout awards. If one wishes to bet that a 6 will appear before the next 7, one may either place one's bet on a small number 6 on the table (I forget the exact layout) or on a big six near the corner. If a $6 bet is placed on each, they'll pay out under the same circumstances, but the former will pay out $7 (plus the original $6 back) for a house vig of 2.78%; the former only pays out $6, for a house vig of 9.10%. Put another way, if you put $6 on the "Big Six" and win, you give the house $1 free as a stupidity tax.

Share this comment


Link to comment
What does the "N of M" mean?

 

Choose N numbers from a pool of M. There are M! / (N! * (M-N)!) ways to do that. For example, if you want to choose six balls out of twenty, there are (6 choose 20) ways of doing that; 20!/(6!*14!) = 2432902008176640000 / (720*87178291200) = 38,760.

 

When computing combinations, btw, it's easiest to note that N! / (N-M)! is the same as N*(N-1)*...(N-M+1); you don't have to let the numbers get huge if you take advantage of the fact that many of the factors cancel.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Cool! Thanks for the explanation and the math. Math is good. Me like math. Using math in gambling is a good way to make it more interesting when there is no money involved.

 

I think I prefer the way DOA:Extreme Beach Volley Ball handles gambling. You can win virtual money and then have something to spend it on, all while looking at artificial women who aren't unpleasant to look at. *sigh* that's only, what, 25 years away from where I am now?

Share this comment


Link to comment
One of the interesting facts about Roulette is the house percantage is the same for every bet...

From what I understand, that isn't true in Monte Carlo, or at least hasn't been historically. If the "0" comes up (there's only one), all bets are marked as "imprisoned". If the next spin of the wheel is one that should pay off, the bettor's money is returned.

That just halves the house percentage from 1/37 (2.7%) to 0.5/37 (1.35%), it's still the same no matter whether you bet on 18, 12, 9, 6, 4, 3, 2 or 1 number.

Share this comment


Link to comment
That just halves the house percentage from 1/37 (2.7%) to 0.5/37 (1.35%), it's still the same no matter whether you bet on 18, 12, 9, 6, 4, 3, 2 or 1 number.

 

From my understanding, suppose you bet $18 on "even". If an odd number comes up, you lose. If an even number comes up, you get $36. If a "0" comes up followed by odd, you lose. If a "0" comes up followed by even, you get back $18.

 

Suppose you instead bet $1 each on 2, 4, 6, 8, etc. If an odd number comes up, you lose. If an even number comes up, you get $36. If a "0" comes up followed by odd, you lose. If a "0" comes up followed by even, you get back the $1 you bet on the particular number that came up, and lose the other $17.

Share this comment


Link to comment
That just halves the house percentage from 1/37 (2.7%) to 0.5/37 (1.35%), it's still the same no matter whether you bet on 18, 12, 9, 6, 4, 3, 2 or 1 number.

 

From my understanding, suppose you bet $18 on "even". If an odd number comes up, you lose. If an even number comes up, you get $36. If a "0" comes up followed by odd, you lose. If a "0" comes up followed by even, you get back $18.

 

Suppose you instead bet $1 each on 2, 4, 6, 8, etc. If an odd number comes up, you lose. If an even number comes up, you get $36. If a "0" comes up followed by odd, you lose. If a "0" comes up followed by even, you get back the $1 you bet on the particular number that came up, and lose the other $17.

Let's look at it from $1 red bet.

first spin red (18/37) returns $2

first spin black (18/37) returns $0

first spin 0 (1/37), second spin red (18/37) returns $1

first spin 0, second spin black or 0 (19/37) returns $0

EV = $2 * 18/37 + $0 * 18/37 + $1 * 18/37 * 1/37 + $0 * 19/37 * 1/37

EV = 36/37 + 18/1369 = 98.6% (versus 97.3%)

HP = 1.39% (versus 2.7%) (okay worse than 1.35%, but I didn't factor in the second 0 spin)

 

Now, reading http://www.casinomontecarlo.com/en/games/t...an_roulette.pdf it sounds like when 0 is spun bets lose half thier value. So there's still a 36:1 payout on single numbers (just for half the bet).

 

In any case, the important thing is to realize the EV/HP doesn't depend on the bet. So for a single number bet:

EV = $36 * 1/37 + $18 * 1/37 * 1/37 = 98.6%

Share this comment


Link to comment

It's interesting to note, although not terribly germain to the above discussion, that roulette wheels in the real world have exhibited behavior that indicates a mechanical preference for a certain number due to anomolies in their construction. The Garcia-Pelayo family (father and son team) was able to exploit this by standing around in a casino tracking every single spin of the wheel and analyzing the frequencies of the results. With a large enough sample they were able to predict the best numbers to bet on and eventually, walk out with a lot of money.

 

http://www.b2g5.com/boards/board.cgi?actio...amp;user=mahony

 

Hmm, I'd bet their strategy doesn't work on casino/cruise ship/river boats. Heh.

Share this comment


Link to comment
It's interesting to note, although not terribly germain to the above discussion, that roulette wheels in the real world have exhibited behavior that indicates a mechanical preference for a certain number due to anomolies in their construction. The Garcia-Pelayo family (father and son team) was able to exploit this by standing around in a casino tracking every single spin of the wheel and analyzing the frequencies of the results. With a large enough sample they were able to predict the best numbers to bet on and eventually, walk out with a lot of money.

 

A Vegas roulette wheel has to be pretty badly 'off' for a player to be able to beat the house, even with full knowledge of its idiosyncracies. Monte Carlo roulette doesn't offer quite so large a vig to the house, but even so the vig should still be bigger than any discrepancies in the wheel probabilities.

Share this comment


Link to comment

I'm happy you guys found something interesting to discuss on these games. :-)

 

I was also utterly bored by them. Particularly with Slots, which I also don't get. I know one-button games have become a trend, but this is just too literal.

 

These games all rely on luck, however if you happen to be playing them, you don't have any.

 

:D

Share this comment


Link to comment
Guest
Add a comment...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...