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HDTV1080P

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  1. Yes some classic computer and videogame systems use full bridge rectifiers that well convert AC voltage to DC and sometimes well allow a consumer to use either a AC or DC adapter to power the console. However, some videogame/computer systems like the TI-99/4a, Spectravideo, and other systems internal motherboard well be damaged or destroyed if one attempts to input DC voltage when AC voltage is required. The goal when selecting a power supply for the Mattel Intellivision II videogame system was to find a power supply that is as close to the original power supply as possible when compared to the Mattel Intellivision II videogame system power supply. In the 1980’s several computer/videogame systems used a low cost unregulated AC to AC power supply which was cheaper when compared to a unregulated DC to DC power supply or a regulated DC to DC power supply. However in the 21st Century since low cost high quality regulated DC to DC power supplies are the norm, they are now much cheaper in price when compared to a unregulated AC to AC power supply. Its hard to find a unregulated AC to AC power supply, however the TRIAD WAU160-750 AC to AC model when used with a 2.1mm female to 2.5mm male adapter plug is the best choice if the goal is to match the original Intellivision II power supply that was always a unregulated AC to AC model. Also when using a AC to DC power supply in place of a AC to AC power supply one needs to make sure that every single hardware version of the console included a full bridge rectifier. If in the rare chance early hardware versions of the motherboard did not include the full bridge rectifer then pluging in a AC to DC power supply would destroy the motherboard. Currently Digi-key has a QTY of 30 TRIAD WAU160-750 power supplies in stock at a price of $17.96 each. Also one needs to purchase a 2.1mm female to 2.5mm male adapter plug to use it with the Intellivision II videogame system. WAU160-750 Triad Magnetics | Power Supplies - External/Internal (Off-Board) | DigiKey
  2. Over my lifetime I have attended many different colleges and Universities. To clarify when I was at home, I used my ADAM computer when I first went to college. However, after around 10 years of using the ADAM computer, sometime around the year 1993 I had to leave the ADAM at home (sell a few items), and while attending a college for around 2 years away from home, I purchased a small Notebook computer that used Windows with a monochrome screen and a 80 column word processor that underlined spelling errors. Plus I had a Laser printer that I hooked up to my Notebook computer. I prefer desktop computers but I needed the ability to be portable so the computer could be used in the Library, etc. The 1993 Microsoft Word program was a much better word processor when compared to the 1983 Smartwriter program. However around the mid 90’s I sold my Notebook computer and that ended up being my last and only portable computer that I have every owned (some of my family members own portable computers). Then starting around 1995+ I built my first desktop computer. For around 25 years I have always built my own custom desktop computers for myself and family members. In fact I have never owned a name brand desktop computer that was already built, I have always built the computers myself since I like choosing the motherboard, power supply, etc. Since 2015 I have been using my 6 year old X99 motherboard with 128GB of DDR4 memory running under the Windows 10 Professional 64 bit operating system. I am happy with my current setup, but since my first computer was the Coleco ADAM in October 1983 and since I used it for 10 years without a upgrade, I still like using the ADAM for classic exclusive supergames that cannot be found on any other system. Buck Rogers the Supergame and many other games are still the best of the best when compared to any other system. While its true that in late 1985 the Amiga was a more powerful computer system, the problem is many of my favorite ColecoVision/ADAM games were never made for the Amiga computer or even modern Windows systems. One of the main reasons I kept using the ADAM exclsuiving between 1983-1993 was because of its awesome exclusive quality games that many other more powerful systems did not offer and for some games are still not offered. Every videogame and computer system has its pluses and minuses with every console having some exclusive games and programs that are not offered on other systems.
  3. I used my Coleco ADAM in middle school, high school, and college (I used the Smartwriter word processor with letter quality daisy wheel printer). Many people at the time were writing things by hand and sometimes turning their papers in on low quality Dot Matrix printers that sometimes were near letter quality. While the ADAM printer back in 1983 was noisy and slow, it had very good true letter quality characters (The first Laser printer came out in 1976 from IBM, Laser printers were very expensive and did not start replacing daisy wheel and Dot Matrix printers until the late 1980’s and early 90’s in the home). In high school I used the ADAM computer with SmartBasic for one of my projects in an electronics class. However, I forgot about the $500 scholarship that Coleco was offering for College. Also I purchased my Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer in October of 1983 before the small window for the college scholarship. In later years I did purchase a standalone ADAM computer which had the advantage of having a native composite video output that the ColecoVision lacks. However the standalone ADAM is only 99% compatible with ColecoVision cartridges and there is no storage area to hold both controllers. Back in October 1983 the ADAM computer was around $800 for the standalone model and $600 for the Expansion Module #3 ADAM that got added to the $200 ColecoVision. The prices slowly came down after the release date. However after January 1985 when Coleco left the computer and videogame business the prices went way down. At one point the ColecoVision videogame console went from $199.99 to $99.99, and then around 1988 was as low as $49.99 for a brand new console. Then around 1988 a standalone ADAM cost under $200 for a brand new one which was $600 cheaper in price when compared to 1983. People were buying the latest and best version of the ADAM with all or most the bugs fixed in late 1984, for under $200 in 1988 as inventory was being cleared out. I wish I would have picked up a few extra at that price. They had the latest motherboard, latest printer, and latest Digital Data Drive. However Disk Drives were rare and were hard to get and the original Coleco Disk Drives were selling new and used in the 80’s for around $200+ and very rarely could one get a ADAM disk drive below that price. Thanks to companies like Micro Innovations there was 1.44MB 3.5 inch ADAMNET disk drives being made that were better quality when compared to the original 1984 single sided 160K floppy disk drive by Coleco.
  4. It should be mentioned that level VI energy efficient power supplies can be just as good or better quality when compared to non-complaint power supplies without the level VI feature. Level VI is just one factor in the engineering process of the power supply. Just because a few models of XP Power supplies are much better quality when compared to some Mean Well models, that does not mean that all XP Power supplies are better quality then Mean Well. There is a possibility that if one tested and compared all Mean Well power supply models to XP Power, then there might be some Mean Well power supplies that offer better performance (but that is just a theory and would need to be proven). I have been in communication with the XP Power company. For their consumer power supplies they offer many level VI complaint single DC output power supplies, however no consumer VI power supplies with a 3 stage DC output in which the ColecoVision/ADAM (-5 volts DC) and Amiga computers (-12 volts DC) require. Therefore those 3 stage output models by XP Power that work with the ColecoVision/ADAM and Amiga are for International markets where level VI is not required yet. Also, its my understanding that there are exceptions to the level VI rules that allows the external power supplies from XP Power to not have level VI if the power supply is for the medical industry or for commercial industrial applications where the power supply will not be used on a consumer electronics product. In my conversation with XP Power it sounds like all of their 3 stage DC output power supplies might be going out of production soon because of lower volume of sells when compared to single stage DC output power supplies that most people want. Therefore, there most likely will never be a level VI complaint 3 stage output DC power supply made by the XP Power company. To special order custom level VI complaint 3 stage DC output power supply that works with the ColecoVision/ADAM and Commodore Amiga, it would require a special order of several thousands of power supplies plus several thousands of dollars in fees like UL listed, etc. Therefore, there is most likely not enough demand to special order several thousands of power supplies from the XP Power company. So International customers might want to pick up a 3 stage XP brand power supply for their ColecoVision/ADAM before they go out of production. Because the only choice that will be left is the Mean Well brand of power supplies which does come in level VI complaint models for 3 stage power supplies.
  5. I wonder if Family Feud for the ADAM has a winning certificate also. When I played Buck Rodgers the Supergame and other supergames I once and a while hit the print button on the keyboard when I was on the hall of fame screen, and the original Coleco ADAM daisy wheel printer would print up a hall of fame screen with the names and top scores. Its my understanding that the 2+ unreleased fully functional Coleco ADAM AdamNet serial/parallel interface boxes that uses the Adamnet cable emulates 100% of all existing ADAM software without a software patch needed. The Coleco employees that own that device can use a dot matrix or Laser printer to print the Jeopardy certificate. All third party released serial/parallel ports do not work as good as the original unreleased Coleco ADAMnet version. The released MIB3 card that plugs into an internal slot in the ADAM computer does not use ADAMNET, and therefore requires 100% software patching. None of the existing software patching works with Jeopardy, and the supergames, and a new patch would need to be created for supergames. The software pathing is limited to Smartwriter, AdamCalc, Recipe Filer, and other programs. In the ideal world someone should create a ADAMNET to USB Smartwriter printer emulator piece of hardware that would completely emulate the Smartwriter printer without any software patches. Then a HP color or black and white Laser printer could be used with support for modern printer communication languages. Also a added extension software code to the ADAMNET to USB Smartwriter printer emulator would be over 1,000 lines of code for advanced color graphics capability. But then in the ideal world a HDMI graphics card that plugs into the side Adam expansion port that offers a new 80 column version of Smartwriter with built in spelling and grammer as one types (the graphics card and Smartwriter would be firmware upgradable with the Ultimate SD Wafer drive). I prefer external power supplies for the Coleco ADAM and ColecoVision. However the one advantage of adding a internal power supply to any device, is that one is except from the level VI energy requirements that the DOE put in place back in Feb of 2016. Only external power supplies have to be level VI complaint.
  6. The original Coleco ADAM power supply that is built into the Smartwriter printer is a amazing design with a total of 4 different voltage outputs. We are all familiar with the regulated -5 volts DC output, + 5 volts DC output, and the 12 volts DC output. However coming out of the power supply is also 18 volts DC unregulated voltage that powers the ribbon solenoid in the daisy wheel printer. When measured with a digital meter the unregulated voltage output when not under a load is around 22.5 volts DC, and around 18 volts DC when under a load when printing a document. Since most people do not use the Smartwiriter printer anymore many people forget the orignal Coleco power supply offers 4 different voltage outputs, instead of 3. Now on the printer/console 9 pin interface cable only 3 of those voltages are sent to the memory console. One has to measure the 4th voltage level from the Molex connector inside the Coleco ADAM Smartwriter printer power supply. Therefore if one is not able to repair their Smartwriter printer power supply, one would need to wire up both a regulated 18 volts DC power supply for printing and a -5 volts DC, 5 volts DC, and 12 volts DC power supply. There would be two separate third party regulated power supplies if one needed to use the Smartwriter printer since no one makes a one power supply solution that offers 18 volts DC, -5 volts DC, + 5 volts DC, and 12 volts DC.
  7. Important update I have spent several more days and hours on this project. And the good news is that the Mean Well GP25B13A-R1B is the best choice and best level VI energy compliant power supply on the market. The GP25B13A-R1B can sometimes provide just as good as picture quality as the so called flagship top of the line Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B power supply. Also, the GP25B13A-R1B has excellent short circuit protection plus excellent stable voltages under a load of 12.02 volts DC, 4.51 volts DC, and -5.19 volts DC when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed. However, on some ColecoVision’s the GP50A13A-R1B model provides a better picture quality due to small variations in the quality of the GP25B13A-R1B and various other factors. However, that being said, there is now two reasons why one should not purchase the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B. (one) The Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B has poor quality short circuit protection between the 5 volt and 12 volt rail and one brief short and the power supply needs to be tossed in the trash. (two) While the ColecoVision/ADAM has built in voltage protection and can take some abuse with the voltages being off, the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B is unacceptable for a regulated power supply. I have never in my entire life seen such a poorly designed power supply where instead of offering -5 volts DC under a load the power supply is offering -7.20 volts DC to the ColecoVision/ADAM CPU when under a load. While the ColecoVision/ADAM can handle being two volts off for several weeks running 24 x7, the power supply is suppose to provide regulated voltages and being off more then a half a volt is unacceptable for a so called top of the line power supply. I did not increase the load any more on the ColecoVision/ADAM just incase the CPU gets hit with -8 volts DC or lower. In summary USA and most international ColecoVision/ADAM owners should stay with the Mean Well GP25B13A-R1B which has accurate regulated voltages under a load with excellent short circuit protection. If one lives outside the United States where level VI power supplies are not required then the much more expensive and better quality XP Power AEH45UM33 should be used as a ColecoVision/ADAM power supply. Click the following link to see detailed voltage results of ColecoVision/ADAM power supplies when under a load.
  8. Now there is two reasons why the XP Power AEH45UM33 is a better power supply when compared to the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B. While the ColecoVision/ADAM has voltage protection and can handle abuse with the voltage being a little off. The Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B suppling -7.20 volts DC to the CPU instead of -5 volts DC is unheard of. The Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B is suppose to be their flagship power supply for -5 volts DC, 5 volts DC, and 12 volts DC. But the poor short circuit protection and being two voltages off when under a load is unacceptable for a regulated power supply. The XP Power AEH45UM33 supplies a stable -5.17 volts DC to the CPU in the ColecoVision/ADAM when under a load. Click the following for more information https://atariage.com/forums/topic/319864-there-is-a-total-of-8-colecovision-compatible-power-supplies-that-well-work-with-the-25cm-gold-plated-colecovision-compatible-power-cord/?do=findComment&comment=4810017
  9. Official voltage numbers of some ColecoVision and ADAM power supplies when under a load The original ColecoVision and ADAM computer power supplies that were manufactured up until 1985, were all high quality regulated power supplies (most videogame and computer systems at the time were using low quality unregulated power supplies). All the modern ColecoVision and ADAM power supplies like Mean Well, XP Power, and any other power supply mentioned in this post are regulated power supplies. The ideal regulated power supply should supply the same voltage when there is no load and when under a load. For example, there are some regulated 12 volt DC power supplies that output up to 5 amps that have a no load voltage of 12.33 volts DC and when under a load a 12.09 DC voltage or a full load voltage of around 12 volts DC exactly. Whereas an unregulated 12 volts DC power supply would have a no-load voltage of 14.97 volts DC and when under a load, around 12.67 volts DC (or somewhere between 15 volts and 12 volts depending on the load). Regulated power supplies are better quality and more expensive when compared to unregulated power supplies. The problem is the ColecoVision, ADAM, and even modern Windows style computers need power supplies that have 3 or more voltages which makes it harder for the power supply to maintain a regulated output for all 3 voltages. The ColecoVision and ADAM use -5 volts DC, 5 volts DC, and 12 volts DC. When a 3 output power supply is under a load sometimes the voltage can go up for some voltages and down for others. The picture of the $2.05 female plug adapter in the prior post allows one to measure the voltages going through the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer when under a load. A $2.05 male plug adapter with a special y-cable allows one to measure the voltages of the standalone ADAM computer when under a load. There is no need to take a videogame system or computer apart to measure voltages as long as one has the correct external adapters and equipment. (one) The original 80’s Coleco brand ADAM power supply voltages when under a load when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM: 11.65 volts DC, 4.99 volts DC, and -5.30 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.56 volts DC, 4.91 volts DC, and -5.37 volts DC. (two) The original 80’s Coleco Smartwriter ADAM printer with built in Coleco power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM: 11.90 volts DC, 5.13 volts DC, and -5.10 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.86 volts DC, 5.09 volts DC, and -5.14 volts DC. (three) Apollo 400 watt power supply when connected to the standalone ADAM computer: 11.95 volts DC, 4.69 volts DC, and -5.10 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.84 volts DC, 4.62 volts DC, and -5.19 volts DC. (four) Apollo 400 watt power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM: 12.04 volts DC, 4.83 volts DC, and -4.92 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.94 volts DC, 4.77 volts DC, and -5.0 volts DC. (five) Smurf 550 watt ColecoVision power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion Module #3 ADAM: No load voltage 12.87 volts DC, 5.48 volts DC, and -4.94 volts DC. When under a load 12.61 volts DC, 4.77 volts DC, and -5.23 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 12.22 volts DC, 4.73 volts DC, and -5.30 volts DC. (six) Averages of the two 28.5 watt Mean Well GP25B13A-R1B and GP25A13A-R1B power supplies when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer: No load voltage 12.49 volts DC, 5.20 volts DC, and -4.99 volts DC. When under a load 12.81 volts DC, 4.52 volts DC, and -5.20 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 12.02 volts DC, 4.51 volts DC, and -5.19 volts DC. (seven) 46.5 watt Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer: No load voltage 12.18 volts DC, 5.18 volts DC, and -5.12 volts DC. When under a load 11.88 volts DC, 4.51 volts DC, and -6.73 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.53 volts DC, 4.39 volts DC, and -7.20 volts DC. (eight) 42 watt XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer: No load voltage 11.90 volts DC, 5.16 volts DC, and -5.02 volts DC. When under a load 11.85 volts DC, 4.54 volts DC, and -5.14 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.42 volts DC, 4.55 volts DC, and -5.17 volts DC. Being around a half a volt (0.5) off plus or minus is no big deal. However there is a serious problem with the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B with the voltage being off 2 volts when under a load. All other power supplies are around -5 volts DC, but the GP50A13A-R1B drops to -7.20 volts DC when under a load. While this GP50A13A-R1B has a good picture quality there are now two reasons why not to recommend the power supply. One reason is the poor quality short circuit protection, and the other reason is that it well not stay around -5 volts DC when under a load and drops down to around -7.20 volts DC. While the ColecoVision/ADAM can handle -7.20 volts DC (it wants -5 volts DC), all other power supplies offer around -5 volts DC when under a load. This is really unacceptable to have a power supply output -7.20 volts DC when it should be -5 volts DC. I am surprised this power supply is still on the market.
  10. If you have the Expansion Module #3 ADAM memory console, you do not need a dedicated wire harness to power the Digital Data Drive as long as you have this special part from China for $2.05 with free shipping and a jumper wire. I verified that the 28.5 watt Mean Well power supply and 3 other power supplies are powerful enough to power the Digital Data Drive without an ADAM wire harness. This solution does not work with the standalone ADAM computer. Check out the following thread for more information https://atariage.com/forums/topic/319864-there-is-a-total-of-8-colecovision-compatible-power-supplies-that-well-work-with-the-25cm-gold-plated-colecovision-compatible-power-cord/?do=findComment&comment=4809388
  11. For all 8 of the power supplies mentioned, they should all work perfectly fine with the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer. In fact, I have personally tested the first 4 power supplies on the list and there is no issue at all when using the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer memory console. However, to use the Digital Data Drive a dedicated ADAM wire harness is needed. However, there is a way to get the Digital Data Drive to work with a ColecoVision power supply as long as the power supply outputs a minimum of 28.5 watts of power without needing to own or make a special ADAM wire harness. If one buys the following high-quality female connector without the nuts from China for $2.05 with free shipping. Then place a 16 gauge, 18 gauge, or 20 gauge jumper wire between pins 1 and 2 (zoom in on the 3rd picture to see jumper wire on pins 1 and 2). Then the Digital Data Drive well receive 12 volts DC from the ColecoVision power supply wire harness. *** One should place the female connector in some type of plastic housing so they do not get electrocuted or create a fire hazard. For safety reasons turn the ColecoVision power off before plugging in or unplugging the female connector on the side of the ADAM memory console *** D-Sub 9pin Solderless Connectors DB9 RS232 Serial to Terminal Adapt DOECU_U.fd | eBay (CHOOSE THE FEMALE CONNECTOR WITHOUT THE NUTS FOR $2.05). Also the better solution is to use an official ADAM wire harness. But the above method works. The ColecoVision power supply wire harness was never designed to power the Digital Data Drive so there is a little bit more video and audio screen noise when the Digital Data Drive goes into high speed. The noise is more visible on the Mean Well 28.5 watt power supply models, but a lot less visible on the Mean Well GP50A13-A-R1B and especially less visible on the XP Power AEH45UM33. See the following pictures of the $2.05 female plug that allows one to use the Digital Data Drive on the Expansion Module #3 with these 8 power supplies on the list. Of course the standalone ADAM does not work with this solution and requires a dedicated wire harness.
  12. While the Mean Well 28.5 watt power supplies for the ColecoVision is an ideal power supply for worldwide use. For those International consumers that want the best of the best, the 42 watt XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply offers a little better picture quality on some ColecoVision’s. A thread has been created regarding this power supply. XP Power company does not make a level VI consumer power supply that is compatible with the ColecoVision, so this power supply cannot be sold in the United States. Also the base price of the Mean Well GP25B13A-R1B is around $33.90 without cables, the XP Power AEH45UM33 without cables is $73.90 (plus each power supply has shipping and taxes that need to be added to those prices plus the cables prices). The 42 watt XP Power AEH45UM33 is a much better ColecoVision compatible power supply when compared to the 46.5 watt Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B power supply (for international markets only, not level VI complaint) - ColecoVision / Adam - AtariAge Forums
  13. The 42 watt XP Power AEH45UM33 is a much better ColecoVision compatible power supply when compared to the 46.5 watt Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B power supply The UL listed and CE listed XP Power AEH45UM33 ColeoVision compatible power supply outperforms the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B power supply (The XP Power supply is engineered in Germany and made in Taiwan). The only negatives of the XP Power supply is that it is not level VI complaint, not FCC certified, and does not have as many worldwide safety certifications when compared to the Mean Well brand. However, the XP Power AEH45UM33 is UL listed and CE listed which makes it a perfect ColecoVision power supply to be sold International around the world accept for the United States (not level VI complaint so cannot be sold as a ColecoVision compatible power supply in the USA. But it can be imported into the United States for International resell as long as its only exported out of the country or used in a commercial industrial application inside the USA). The level VI rules for power supplies is sometimes very complicated and they mainly only apply to consumer products like the ColecoVision (for commercial industrial use only and medical use only their is exceptions to the level VI rules). Here is the link for more information on level VI. Level VI is here! Are you Compliant? | Current Solutions While its true that the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B has a little more wattage, is level VI complaint, FCC certified, and has a massive amount of worldwide safety certifications, the problem with the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B is that if there is one brief short between the 5 volt and 12 volt rail then the power supply is destroyed and needs to be tossed in the trash. Most people would view this as an engineering design flaw. The 46.5 watt Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B without cables costs around $52.07. The 42 watt XP Power AEH45UM33 costs around $73.90 without cables. A better quality power supply costs more money and also has a better picture quality. There is a medical grade XP Power PCM50UT03 power supply for around $101.85 without cables. I have not tested that power supply yet, and it might offer a cleaner and better analog picture quality yet. XP Power supplies are better quality then Mean Well power supplies, but they cost more money and many are not level VI complaint (non of the ColecoVision compatible XP Power models are level VI), Mean Well has a monopoly on consumer power supplies since they are level VI complaint. Hopefully XP Power well make some more level VI power supplies for the consumer market, since their power supplies are a nice alternative to the Mean Well brand for those willing to pay a higher price for better quality. The 42 watt XP Power AEH45UM33 has perfect short circuit protection and also an excellent picture quality when connected to the ColecoVision using the gold plated 25CM ColecoVision cable I spent over an hour testing the short circuit protection and trying to fry the XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply. I must have shorted the power supply over a 100 times for over a hour and every time it perfectly shut off during the short and then recovered once the short was removed. I could not break this power supply. This power supply is very well engineered. Just take a screw driver and touch the pins on the DIN plug and there is no combination that the power supply cannot handle when it comes to shorting the 5, 12, -5, ground, and shield. However one brief short on the Mean Well GP50A12A-R1B between 5 volts and 12 volts and the power supply never recovers and ends up being tossed in the trash. If one modifies their ColecoVision to have HDMI and DVI output then it really does not matter what power supply is connected, since digital signals have perfect picture as long as the power requirements are good enough and as long as there are no digital artifacts from the HDMI and DVI cable speed/quality requirements. However, in the analog NTSC/PAL world the better the quality of the power supply, the better quality the ColecoVision picture will be when outputting VGA, RGB, component video, S-Video, composite video, and RF. *** On a perfectly working ColecoVision, the picture quality is directly related to how good of quality the power supply is. *** The 42 watt XP Power AEH45UM33 is reference quality with a picture quality that beats the original 80’s ColecoVision power supply, Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B power supply, and is almost as good as my 550 watt Smurf ColecoVision power supply that is based on a ATX design using high quality Chinese components. There are no faint noise lines on the screen like some people have complained about with certain models of power supplies. This 42 watt XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply has a very nice build quality and the male 5 pin DIN connector even has a tighter fit when connected to the 25CM ColecoVision compatible power cord (Very tight fit on the XP Power DIN connector and well not come loose unless pulled with a lot of force). Also, the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer can be powered by this XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply, however to use the Digital Data Drive a different wire harness needs to be used. XP Power AEH45UM33 (super awesome power supply with outstanding short circuit protection). However, can only be offered to ColecoVision owners outside of the United States since not level VI complaint. Price $73.90 and around $85 delivered after taxes and shipping. No power cords included at those prices.
  14. There is a total of 8 desktop power supplies that are compatible with this $15.99 Gold Plated 25CM ColecoVision compatible power cord. Only 3 out of the 8 power supplies are level VI complaint. Here is a thread regarding the power supplies that work with this cable. There is a total of 8 ColecoVision compatible power supplies that well work with the 25CM Gold Plated ColecoVision compatible power cord - ColecoVision / Adam - AtariAge Forums
  15. If some company would develop a level VI AC to AC desktop power supply with a 5 pin male DIN plug then this gold plated power cord could also be used with the TI-99 series computers, Spectravideo 318 and 328 computers, and the Blue Chip Commodore compatible disk drives.
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