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  1. My very first brand new videogame system, was the ColecoVision back around August of 1982. Then in October of 1983 I purchased the expansion module #3 ADAM computer that turned my ColecoVision into not only a high-end computer but a more advanced videogame system that played Supergames. Every videogame and computer system has its plusses and minuses. The ColecoVision/ADAM ended up going out of production in January of 1985. It was not until October 1985 in North America that a more powerful videogame system called the Nintendo Entertainment System was able to beat graphics and sound performance of the out of production ColecoVision/ADAM. Back in February of 1979 the Magnavox Odyssey 2 was released in North America. The Odyssey 2 was both a videogame system and a computer. The Odyssey 2 had a Computer Intro cartridge that allowed one to write programs on the computer and run those programs, however many people do not consider the Odyssey 2 to be a computer since there is no input and output jacks to store and retrieve homemade programs like what is found on the ATARI 400 and 800 computers that were released later that year in November of 1979. There were 4 million ATARI computers sold, 2 million ColecoVision’s, 500,000 Coleco ADAM’s, and the Odyssey 2 was popular enough to sell 2 million systems. I purchased a used 1979 Odyssey 2 videogame/computer system for the first time just fairly recently in October of 2020. My first encounter with the Odyssey 2 was in a retail store back in 1979, it had a fancy keyboard when compared to 1979 keyboards, however almost every retail store I visited where I lived, the Odyssey 2 system was not on display and also not hooked up to a TV. I remember back in or around 1980 that the ATARI 2600 and Intellivision were the two main videogame systems that were hooked up to TV’s in retail stores and getting most of the attention. The 1977 Atari 2600 had better graphics then the Odyssey 2 (2 million Odyssey 2 systems sold) and the Atari 2600 sold around 30 million videogame consoles. The 1979 Intellivision which was more powerful then both the Odyssey 2 and Atari 2600 sold over 3 million videogame consoles. While most people are disappointed in the videogame graphics quality of the Odyssey 2, it does have some videogames that are better than the May 1982 Arcadia 2001 videogame system. While some of the videogames are lacking in detail when it comes to graphics quality on the Odyssey 2, the two big advantages of the Odyssey 2 over most videogame systems including the ATARI 2600 and Arcadia 2001, is that the Odyssey 2 has a computer keyboard and a voice add on module (However the computer keyboard on the Odyssey 2 is not as good of quality as the state of the art Coleco ADAM keyboard, and also the Odyssey 2 has no expansion interface so the cartridge slot is used to attach hardware upgrades like the Odyssey 2 voice module). One big advantage of the Intellivision Voice Synthesis module is that the voices generated from the Intellivoice are all mixed in with the main audio coming out of the TV speaker. The big negative of the Odyssey 2 is that most likely because of some technical issues, the audio from the Odyssey 2 voice module is not automatically mixed in with the audio that is generated from the main videogame console. Therefore 100% of the time when using a special game cartridge that is voice enhanced one has to manually adjust the volume on the voice module so that the dedicated speaker on the voice module is at the correct level. Therefore, every time one adjusts the voice on the TV speaker they also need to turn up or down the voice that is generated from the built-in speaker from the voice module. It is too bad that the Odyssey 2 system was not able to make a voice module that internally mixed the audio just like the Intellivoice was able to do for the Intellivision videogame system. While most the programs that are voice enhanced for the Odyssey 2 sound like a computer generated voice, there are some game cartridges like K.C.’s Krazy Chase that has a excellent natural human voice quality that is really amazing for that period of time. The Odyssey 2 voice module was known as a major enhancement that people with an ATARI 2600 and many other videogame systems at that period of time could not hear voices. The Odyssey 2 videogame system started off correctly by offering on its first generation Odyssey 2 consoles DB9 detachable hand controllers that were painted silver. These were 8 direction joysticks with a fire button. So far I have never seen a defective Odyssey 2 joystick (even though they most likely exist). I have purchased many used videogame consoles and controllers like the ColecoVision, Intellivision, and others, which usually have controllers that wear out and are not as reliable as some systems. There is something special about the Odyssey 2 controllers, they seem to have a very good build quality and the several that I have used that are around 40 years old work perfectly fine with no flaws at all. However, what is really disappointing is that the second generation hand controllers (painted black) that shipped with the second generation of the Odyssey 2, are hardwired to the Odyssey 2 motherboard which makes it very difficult to replace the controller if the controller or cable becomes damaged. The Odyssey 2 hardware engineers should have stayed with the first generation detachable DB9 style of controllers (one has to detach or connect the DB9 controllers when the system is off, since while the system was on a lock up would occur when messing with the two DB9 ports). Another negative is that the Odyssey 2 first generation systems that do have the silver controllers with DB9 ports, use a proprietary wiring method so that only Odyssey 2 controllers work on an Odyssey 2 videogame system. The Odyssey 2 system would have been a more popular system if all the Odyssey 2 consoles had DB9 jacks that were 100% compatible with the ATARI 2600 controllers. However maybe Atari would not have liked Magnavox making the Odyssey 2 to be compatible with standard Atari joysticks. There were a massive amount of third party Atari 2600 controllers being made, it is disappointing that the Odyssey 2 was not designed to be compatible with standard Atari 2600 controllers. Then they made the Odyssey 2 system worse by getting rid of the DB9 controller ports and making all second generation Odyssey 2 systems controllers hardwired to the motherboard. Another bad decision by the Odyssey 2 engineers was to make some of the consoles using a 2.1mm power plug and other consoles using a 3.5mm power plug. All other brands of videogame and computer systems that I know of always used the same exact style of power plug if it was the same exact model number, and would never change plug size for the same exact model number of videogame or computer system. For some reason some Odyssey 2 videogame systems ship with a 3.5mm power plug and others ship with a 2.1mm size power plug. The AC voltage and current draw was exactly the same and the only difference was the power plug size. However, when consumers lost their power supply or needed a replacement for some reason, the consumer had to determine if they need to purchase the 3.5mm version of the power supply or the 2.1mm version of the power supply. The latest versions of the Odyssey 2 videogame system power supply has both a 2.1mm and 3.5mm plug at the end of the power cord so that only one power supply needed to be made instead of two separate power supplies. My point is that in the ideal world all Odyssey 2 systems should have been made with the exact same power plug size. The first generation of Odyssey 2 consoles uses a custom size RF plug that only works with the special first generation of Odyssey 2 TV game switches. One positive feature of the second generation Odyssey 2 systems, is that they used a standard male RCA plug at the end of the RF cable that almost all other systems in the 70’s and 80’s used. The advantage of systems like the Intellivision and ColecoVision is that there is a female RF jack on back of the consoles, which allows one to easily replace the RF cable with a standard RCA to RCA jack with the length of cable that a person wants to use. However on 100% of all Odyssey 2 consoles the RF cable is hardwired to the console, and one has to take apart the console to replace the RF cable. One big negative of 100% of the Odyssey 2 consoles is that the RF channel 3 and 4 selector switch is located inside the console, therefore one needs to take the console apart to flip the RF switch to either channel 3 or 4. This is unheard of and even the old 1977 Atari 2600 system along with all other systems that I know of have the RF switch on the outside of the console. There are people that complain that the Odyssey 2 has a bad RF picture and sound quality. However I found that the 1979 Odyssey 2 console has a excellent quality RF modulator. The problem people normally are having is with the old RG-59 22 gauge unshielded cable causing the problem. I opened up one of the Odyssey 2 consoles and replaced the RF cable with a short shielded cable connected to a gold plated female RCA jack (see attached pictures). This allows me to connect any RCA to RCA shielded RG6 18 gauge cable between 3 to 100 feet in length with good picture and sound quality results. As far as I am aware at the time of this post their exists no third party native HDMI, component video, or S-Video upgrade kits for the Odyssey 2 . However their exists native RGB and composite video upgrade kits for the Odyssey 2. Overall I found that the Odyssey 2 has a excellent build quality and is very easy to open up and work on when compared to other systems. There are very few Odyssey 2 systems that are actually defective since the Magnavox build quality of the controllers, motherboard, keyboard, and other components after around 41 years was very reliable. Compared to opening up the CoelcoVision/ADAM, the Odyssey 2 is super easy for the average person to get open and to close back up. My 1982 ColecoVision videogame system and my 1983 Coleco ADAM outperforms the Odyssey 2 in both graphics and sound quality. The ColecoVision had a few third party voice games without any voice module, and the ADAM had a third party Eve Speech module that improved voice capabilities. The 1979 Intellivision had better video and sound when compared to the Odyssey 2, and the Intellivision could also speak with a add on voice unit. Even the Atari 2600 videogame system had better graphics quality when compared to the Odyssey 2. When I played Football, Baseball and many other sports and action games, the ColecoVision sports games and action games are much better. Some of the videogames for the Odyssey 2 system grew on me after using them for a while this month, like Invaders from Hyperspace was nice and K.C. Munchkin was unique. In fact, Philips and Magnavox ended up being sued by ATARI and Midway for K.C. Munchkin and was ordered by the court to pull the videogame from store shelfs and to stop manufacturing K.C. Munchkin because the maze game was too similar to the Pacman videogame. I never felt like I was playing Pacman, since the K.C. Munchkin is very different then Pacman. If one does not eat all the dots on the screen before being killed, the maze starts over. K.C, Munchkin does have better graphics and sound when compared to the original ATARI 2600 version of Pacman. However, the Atari 2600 version of MS. Pacman and Junior Pacman is much better then K.C. Munchkin. To be fair one has to compare the exact same videogame title that was released on the Atari 2600 to the exact same title released on the Odyssey 2 to say for sure which system is better. The problem is in North America there was no third-party support for the Odyssey 2 system, which made it impossible to compare exact same videogame titles. The Odyssey 2 has more limited color palette when compared to the Atari 2600. The big advantage of the Odyssey 2 was its keyboard (but no arrow keys or backspace as far as I can tell), and the voice module was a nice feature over most videogame systems at the time. With the keyboard it allowed Odyssey 2 users to use unique education games, etc. However even though the Odyssey 2 system was not as popular as some other systems, it was popular enough to sell as many systems as the ColecoVision (2 million sold). Also I liked the build quality of the 41 year old Odyssey 2 system with perfect operating controllers after 41 years old. As I spent more time with the Odyssey 2 system, the voice module enhanced cartridges started to grow on me. I have not tried every videogame for the Odyssey 2, just over a dozen so far. However, the 1982 “You Type It Talks” cartridge was very unique”. You place the cartridge into the Odyssey 2 voice module cartridge slot and just about any paragraph you type, the Odyssey 2 system will read back in a computerized voice. Back in 1982 this would have been really unique for a kid or adult to play with. This is a unique program that would require both a computer keyboard and voice module on any other computer system of that day in order to duplicate the performance of the “You Type It Talks” cartridge. Then I inserted the sequel to K.C. Munchkin called K.C. Krazy Chase, and was amazed at the graphics and sound, especially the sound. For the first time while using the Odyssey 2 I was hearing actual human quality speech from the K.C. Krazy Chase videogame and not some computerized voice. The Odyssey 2 does have some amazing voice quality, just try K.C. Krazy Chase with the voice module attached. But I have to say that the talking in K.C. Krazy Chase can sometimes be too much, and at times too much voice activity in my opinion. What ended up being one of my most favorite videogames for the Odyssey 2 system that I have tried so far is called “Attack of the Timelord”, which is also voice enhanced. Attack of the Timelord has a nice balance and does not over use the voice speaking technology. Attack of the Timelord is unique and its different then Space Invaders and different then Galaxian or Gorf. Attack of the Timelord while the graphics are lacking, the speed and game play is very fast like a modern videogame. Attack of the TimeLord is one of my favorite videogames on the Odyssey 2, amazing speed, and quality that I have not seen on the Atari 2600 and Intellivision systems (Maybe such a game could be done for other systems, but that is the problem when one does not have the exact same titles to play on each videogame system, it makes it harder to determine the quality of the system). The 1979 Odyssey 2 computer/videogame system was a unique experience, and while the graphics and sound quality are lacking when compared to the ColecoVision/ADAM, the ability to have a keyboard and voice module was two of the Odyssey 2 systems major strengths. This is why they were at least able to sell around 2 million consoles. For the Odyssey 2 system to be more popular they needed to have some third party support which they never received in North America, and they needed to have some arcade classics. It is my understanding that Turtles was the only official arcade game released for the Odyssey 2 in North America, however at the time of this writing I have never played or seen it. I heard that in Europe that Parker Brothers released many arcade ports for the Odyssey 2 like Qbert, Popeye, Super Cobra, and Frogger. Also there was a completed Tutankham videogame for the Odyssey 2 in Europe but it was never officially released. However looking online the Atari 2600 version of Popeye and Frogger has better graphics and sound quality when compared to the Odyssey 2. The Odyssey 2 system in the ideal world should have been designed to have just as good of graphics and sound as the Atari 2600 or better yet should have been designed to be better than the Intellivision. They had the advantage of a full size keyboard and voice module, but they needed to standardize their controller ports, power ports, and RF ports instead of offering two different versions. While there are some unique videogames for the Odyssey 2, I still prefer the quality of both the Intellivision and Atari 2600. Even the Atari 2600 had better overall videogames. The 1979 Odyssey 2 could have been a more popular system if it would had had more support and one of the reasons it did not have more support is because overall many of the videogames made for that system did not have graphics and sound quality as good as other systems like the Atari 2600. While I have not played the Parker Brothers Odyssey 2 arcade ports from Europe, one can clearly see from online videos that the Atari 2600 Parker Brother titles are better quality for graphics and sound. The Odyssey 2 like the Atari 2600 and Intellivision system is lacking an expansion module interface to add more memory, sound capabilities, unless the cartridge port is used to expand the system. The 1982 ColecoVision was unique in its ability to be able to expand the system by using the front expansion module interface, where as most all other videogame systems of its time required the use of the cartridge slot to add new improved hardware to the videogame console. People will always remember the classic exclusive videogames like Attack of the Timelord and others that are only offered on the Odyssey 2. The Odyssey 2 build quality and the fairly easy ways to open and close the console for repairs is nice. I do prefer the Odyssey 2 system over the Arcadia 2001, since there are some nice videogames that make use of the keyboard and voice module. Every system has its pluses and minus, and the Odyssey 2 system was as popular as the ColecoVision in terms of overall sells, but unlike the ColecoVision, the Odyssey 2 ended up being a less popular videogame systems with no third party support in North America. However in the 21st Century one of the reasons why the ColecoVision/ADAM still has a lot of third party support, is because people are starting to understand that the ColecoVision/ADAM was the best quality videogame system that was similar in some ways to its more powerful replacement called the Nintendo Entertainment System (Both the NES and Amiga computer were more powerful in late 1985 when compared to the CoelcoVision/ADAM which went out of production in January of 1985).
  2. If one needs a replacement power supply for their Nintendo Entertainment System, then the best 100% compatible power supply to get is the TRIAD WAU090-1200 that was engineered in the USA and made in China using high quality materials. The original NES-002 power supply had a cord that is around 8 feet 4 inches long. This TRIAD WAU090-1200 Nintendo NES compatible power supply has a cord that is 6 feet long according to the spec sheet (However my actual TRIAD had a real world length of 6 feet 7 inches). As of February 10th 2016, all external power supplies manufactured for use in the United States and imported into the United States is required to have the energy efficiency level VI rating per the Department of Energy law. Dealers in the United State that have old stock of power supplies, are allowed under the law to sell their old stock of power supplies as long as those power supplies were manufactured and imported into the United States before Feb 10th 2016. In 2020 many AC to DC power supplies one purchases online are level VI complaint. However AC to AC power supplies are not in demand, since most modern consumer products in the 21st Century use AC to DC power supplies, therefore there are some USA dealers that still have old stock of AC to AC power supplies that they imported into the United States before February 10th 2016, that they are trying to get rid off at clearance prices. However, there are also many third-party companies producing both AC to AC and AC to DC external power supplies that are made in China, and violating the Department of Energy level VI compliant rules put in place back in February 10th 2016. *** I have done a massive amount of research and as far as I aware the TRIAD Magnetics company is the only company that makes AC to AC external power supplies that have the required energy efficiency level VI defined by the DOE Docket Number EERE-2008-BT-STD-0005-0219. *** TRIAD engineers the power supplies in the United States and has the power supplies made in China using very high quality parts and material. While external AC to DC power supplies that are level VI complaint started appearing on the USA market in late 2015 or early 2016, the first TRIAD AC to AC level VI complaint power supplies started appearing on the USA market around January 24th 2017. Here is the detailed spec sheet for the TRIAD WAU090-1200 that is ideal for use with the Nintendo Entertainment System. The cheapest price for the TRIAD WAU090-1200 is around $20-$25 when purchased online. This is a heavy transformer based power supply since light weight switching based consumer AC to AC power supplies have not been invented yet and might never be invented because of lack of demand for AC to AC power supplies. At the time of this post Newark sells the TRIAD WAU090-1200 for $19.63 each plus free shipping on orders over $150. Another dealer called Mouser Electronics has the TRIAD WAU090-1200 for $16.36 + $7.99 for shipping (total price around $24.35). *** This is a top of the line power supply for the Nintendo Entertainment System. This power supply has excellent build quality. *** This high-end third party power supply is a direct replacement for the original NES-002 power supply · 100% compatible with the original NES-101 front loading model that was released in 1985. · 100% compatible with the original NES-101 top loading model that was released in 1993. ** Not compatible with the Super Nintendo Entertainment System ** This is a factory new 100% compatible power supply for the Nintendo Entertainment System. This is a high-end replacement power supply for the Nintendo Entertainment System. This power supply is a high-quality consumer AC power supply that is designed for North America and has an input voltage of 120 volts AC at 60Hz. Rated output voltage is 9 volts AC at 1.2 amps. Since all consumer AC to AC power supplies on the market use unregulated voltage designs, there is a load curve from zero to full load. When this power supply is connected to the Nintendo Entertainment System, it will output the proper voltage just like the original Nintendo NES-002 power supply. More information about this can be found in the Questions and Answers section. Power supply has UL listed safety certification for the United States market and CUL safety certification for the Canadian markets (UL safety certificate number E341931). Efficiency Level VI certified by the Department of Energy (DOE): Consuming up to 25% less power than previous 60 Hertz AC power supplies, this line of AC power supplies was among the first to meet the U.S. Department of Energy’s Level VI efficiency standard. This is slightly larger than similar products of lesser efficiency, as higher-grade core materials are needed to meet the Level VI requirements. RoHS Complaint power supply Engineered in the United States and made in China using high quality materials. Output cord is 6 feet long. 10 year warranty offered directly by the manufacture of the power supply. Questions and Answers Question: What Nintendo products is this power supply compatible with? Answer: This third-party power supply is a direct replacement for the original NES-002 power supply. This power supply is for use only with the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES-101). This power supply works with both the NES-101 front loading model released in 1985 and the top loading model released in 1993. However, this power supply is not compatible with the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, since that system uses a different type of power supply. Question: How does the quality of this third-party AC to AC power supply compare to my original Nintendo Entertainment System power supply with a model number of NES-002? Answer: This power supply is slightly better quality when compared to the original Nintendo power supply. There have been major improvements in the design of AC to DC power supplies over the last 40+ years, however in the last 40+ years there has only been minor improvements when it comes to AC to AC power supplies. In fact, finding an AC to AC power supply on the market is rare since many companies have decided to only make DC power supplies. This AC to AC power supply is UL listed which is a safety certification for the USA market. In addition, this power supply has the Canadian CUL safety certification. This power supply has the required Energy Efficiency Level VI certification by the Department of Energy (DOE). This power supply is RoHS complaint too. Currently this is the only level VI approved AC power supply on the North American market that will work with the Nintendo Entertainment System. Question: The original Nintendo NES-002 power supply has a label on it that says it outputs 9 volts AC at 1.3 amps. Why does this third party power supply have a label on it that says it outputs 9 volts AC at 1.2 amps? Answer: The Nintendo Entertainment System will never use more than 0.85 amps, therefore any 9 volt AC power supply that offers a minimum of 0.85 amps capacity will work with the NES as long as the power cord has the correct plug style at the end of the cord. This third-party power supply is an ideal power supply for use with the Nintendo Entertainment System. However, to answer your original question of why this third-party power supply has 0.1 amps less capacity when compared to the original NES-002 power supply. Back in 2015 there use to be 9 volt AC to AC power supplies in production that had higher capacities like 1.5 amps. At the end of the year 2015 all 9 volt AC power supplies designed for the USA consumer market went out of production, and when the new Feb 2016 level VI energy efficiency law went into effect by the Department of Energy, AC to AC power supply companies decided to design only 9 volt AC to AC power supplies with a maximum capacity of 1.2 amps for the consumer market. It is technically possible for a power supply company to make a level VI approved 9 volt AC to AC power supply with higher capacities like 1.5 amps output and even higher outputs, however it would cost around $15,000 to get such a power supply UL tested. Because of the lack of demand for AC to AC power supplies there is a possibility that no company will every make a 9 volt AC to AC power supply with a 1.3 amp or 1.5 amp capacity that is level VI rated. The premium materials and overdesign required to meet Level VI makes the parts more expensive. Also, the $15,000 investment for UL testing makes it hard for power supply companies to justify designing a second generation of higher capacity level VI approved AC to AC power supplies. What is the real-world voltage output on the Nintendo NES-002 power supply and this third-party power supply when under a load? Answer: Unregulated AC to AC power supplies are much more complicated when compared to regulated AC to DC power supplies that most people normally use. All consumer AC to AC power supplies on the market have unregulated designs, which means there is a load curve from zero load to full load. For example, the original Nintendo NES-002 power supply label on it says 9 volts AC at 1.3 amps, and under real world conditions has a no-load voltage of around 10.38 volts AC. When the original Nintendo NES-002 power supply is under a load from the Nintendo Entertainment System, it is outputting around 9.82 volts AC. When the Nintendo NES-002 power supply is connected to the Nintendo Entertainment System, it never outputs 9 volts AC, and will always output around 9.82 volts AC when under a load. The reason for the 9.82 volts AC output on the NES-002 unregulated power supply is because the Nintendo Entertainment System never uses more then 0.85 amps. The only way to get the original unregulated Nintendo NES-002 AC power supply to output around 9 volts AC would be to disconnect it from the Nintendo Entertainment System and place it on an actual hardware device that would draw around 1.3 amps, then the voltage would drop down to around 9 volts AC because of the load curve. This third-party power supply that has a label on it that says 9 volts AC at 1.2 amps works perfectly with the Nintendo Entertainment System and according to the load curve data is almost a perfect match. For example, this third-party power supply according to the specs has a voltage rating of 11.6 volts AC when there is no load (zero current draw). Under real world conditions I measured around 11.09 volts AC when there is no load. However as soon as the Nintendo Entertainment System is drawing a load, this third party power supply outputs around 10.26 volts AC. Around 10.26 volts AC is the proper voltage to use with the Nintendo Entertainment System and is almost a perfect match according to the load curve data (there is only 0.44 volts difference between the two power supplies, which is really good when comparing unregulated power supplies to each other). Using this third-party power supply, the Nintendo Entertainment System will not drop below 10.26 volts AC while under a load. This third-party AC power supply because of the unregulated voltage curve will only output around 9 volts AC when under a full load of 1.2 amps, and the Nintendo Entertainment System never uses more than 0.85 amps. Since the original Nintendo NES-002 power supply outputs around 9.82 volts AC when under a load, this third-party power supply with a voltage output of around 10.26 volts AC is almost a perfect match (there is only 0.44 volts difference between the two power supplies, which is good when comparing unregulated power supplies to each other). Question: Can I use this power supply with other products that I own that need 9 volts AC and what would happen if the current draw on the device I connect to this power supply starts to draw more than 1.2 amps? Answer: Because of the load curve on all consumer unregulated AC power supplies, one needs to be careful with the products they use this power supply with. The load curve for this power supply under real word conditions is between 11.09 volts to 9 volts AC. This power supply will only output around 9 volts AC when the load is 1.2 amps. Since the Nintendo Entertainment System never draws more than 0.85 amps of power, then this power supply outputs around 10.26 volts AC when used with the Nintendo Entertainment System. However, one should never use this power supply with a product that requires more than 1.2 amps, since the voltage would drop below 9 volts AC and destroy the power supply. Unregulated AC power supplies have a small safety margin where the fuse in the power supply will not open if there is a brief current draw that goes over the 1.2 amps for only a few seconds. AC to AC transformers are not designed for the user to exceed the output current. Given an overload condition, they will start to heat-up and internal built-in safety mechanisms (fuse) will open, permanently destroying the power supply. These power supplies are sealed at the factory and were not designed to be opened up for a user to replace the fuse, also the 10-year manufactory warranty would most likely not be honored if the consumer abused the power supply and went over the stated current of 1.2 amps. Question: Why is this power supply only offered in North America, what if I wanted to use this power supply on 220 volts at 50Hz? Answer: This power supply would be permanently destroyed and the internal fuse would blow if connected to 220 volts at 50Hz. All consumer AC to AC power supplies are made for either 120 volts AC at 60Hz or 220 volts AC at 50Hz. In the 21st Century major technological advances have been made on worldwide regulated AC to DC power supplies that work between 100-240 volts AC at 50-60Hz. However, because of that lack of consumer demand for unregulated AC to AC power supplies being used in the 21st Century, the research and development costs have not been spent to make AC to AC power supplies work worldwide between 100-240 volt AC at 50-60Hz. Therefore, all consumer AC to AC power supplies for the North America market are still designed to only work with 120 volts at 60Hz. There are power supply companies in Europe that do make AC to AC power supplies that work at only 220 volts at 50Hz, and one might be able to locate one that works with the Nintendo Entertainment System.
  3. My very first videogame system that I owned was the ColecoVision that I purchased around August of 1982. Then in October of 1983 I purchased the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer that included a Super Game Module with more advanced videogames up to 256K in size on Digital Data Packs. The ColecoVision/ADAM was the most advanced videogame system between the years 1982 to 1985. However, in January of 1985 Coleco stop production on both the ColecoVision and ADAM. This was a business decision during the 1983 to 1985 videogame crash. Since they were shutting down Coleco had no plans to release a new 8 bit or 16-bit second generation videogame and computer system to replace the ColecoVision/ADAM. Coleco sold over 2 million ColecoVisions and over 500,000 ADAM systems. For the very first time I just purchased a used original 1985 Nintendo Entertainment system After the videogame and computer crash in the United States, Nintendo saw a new opportunity to release a videogame system called the Nintendo Entertainment system (NES) on October 18th 1985 in North America. For the very first time a videogame system more powerful than the ColecoVision/ADAM was released. The Nintendo Entertainment system was so popular that it sold around 62 million consoles worldwide. Both the Nintendo Entertainment system and Commodore Amiga that came out in 1985 were more powerful when compared to the ColecoVision/ADAM. However, as the years went on I kept using my Coleco ADAM computer system for around 10 years for word processing and still use the Coleco ADAM for classic videogames that are exclusive to that system. Between the years 1983 to around 1993 the Coleco ADAM was my only computer system, until I purchased an IBM compatible with Windows 3.1. My first experience with the Nintendo Entertainment system was in the late 80’s while visiting a relative. I ended up playing the NES at the relatives’ house. However just recently in the last year or two I have been purchasing some older classic 70’s and 80’s videogame and computer systems that I have only used in retail stores in the past around 40 years ago. I purchased a used Nintendo Entertainment system recently. I am amazed at the graphics and sound quality of the NES, which does beat my ColecoVision/ADAM system. The NES videogames have 64 sprites and some game cartridges are around 1MB in size. While someone did make Mario Brothers for the ColecoVision, Super Mario Brothers does not exist for the ColecoVision. I was amazed at the graphics and sound quality of Super Mario Bothers on the NES. However, while the NES most of the time has better graphics and sound then the ColecoVision. Some videogames like Donkey Kong and Donkey Kong Junior are better quality on the Coleco ADAM when compared to the NES. The Coleco ADAM versions of Donkey Kong and Donkey Kong Junior contain all the intermissions with all the screens. So, in the 80’s the best version of Donkey Kong was on the Coleco ADAM with all 4 screens including the conveyor belt stage. Also a former Coleco employee leaked to the ADAM community in the early 80’s the unreleased 5 screen version of Donkey Kong Junior (only the 4 screen version was released). I heard that in the year 2010 that in Europe that a special version of Donkey Kong was released for the NES that has for the first time all the intermissions with all 4 screens. However, I have never seen or played this 2010 version. There is a possibility that this new 2010 version of Donkey Kong for the NES might be better when compared to the original Donkey Kong the supergame that was released for the Coleco ADAM in 1984. I like the NES Zapper light gun which was a controller style not found on most home videogame systems in the 70’s and early 80’s. While I like the original NES controller, it lacked the keypad controller that was offered on other system like the ColecoVision/ADAM. With a keypad controller unique education and other unique games could have been developed for the NES (most people prefer arcade and action games which are perfect for the existing NES controller, NES kept their controller simple and easy for the average person to use. That is one reason why the ATARI 2600 was popular since it had a simple controller with not too many buttons). The standalone Coleco ADAM had a composite video and audio output, however to get audio a special DIN plug needed to be used (The ColecoVision only had RF output). As far as I am aware the very first videogame system that used standard female RCA jacks for composite video and audio output was the NES system. That is a nice design on the NES to have standard composite video and audio jacks. Too many 20th century videogame systems require a special adapter plug to get the best possible quality to one’s display/TV system. The good thing about all modern 21st Century videogame systems in the last 10 to 15 years, is that they all use some type of HDMI style connector to interface the videogame system to one’s projector or flat panel display. The original 1985 NES has a 48-pin card edge connector expansion port on the bottom of the console that no company has every made a hardware device for. However reading online to access the 48 pin connector one has to cut or break the plastic tab on the door to gain access to the connector. Both Mattel and Nintendo made it really difficult to gain access to the expansion interface (The Mattel computer module and voice module have issues accessing the connector that sometimes is missing from the motherboard). At least the ColecoVision and ADAM has an easy plastic door to access the expansion module. The Coleco ADAM has 4 expansion ports (1 external and 3 internal that are easy to access). The 1982 ColecoVision system has a nice onscreen logo that tells people that they need to turn off the videogame system before inserting a cartridge or expansion module. That is rare for a 80's system, and was not even offered on the NES. The NES instead has a flashing LED light with a blue screen that flashes instead of having a onscreen logo that tells people that they do not have a cartridge inserted. The biggest negative of the original 1985 NES videogame console was that the front-loading cartridge design became known as a major problem since many people had to replace their 72-pin connector which was easily damaged with bent pins when a cartridge is inserted several times. As a solution to the original NES front loading cartridge design flaw that showed up after many months or years of cartridge inserts, Nintendo released the NES-101 top loading cartridge model in 1993, which was a more reliable cartridge inserting and ejection system. However, the original 1985 NES has better picture and sound quality because of the standard composite video and audio output. To make the USA NES 1993 top loader cheaper, that top loading model only has a RF output. It really is a bad decision 8 years later to rerelease a new NES version for North America without at least composite or S-Video output. In 1993 TV sets with composite video inputs was a standard feature, and some what rare on some TV’s in 1985. Today in the 21st Century people use a NES emulator with HDMI on their Windows PC or a third-party console to play NES games. There is many third-party video game consoles that accept NES, SNES, and Genesis game cartridges from one console, and then they output to HDMI and sometimes an analog video options like S-Video and composite if one does not want to use HDMI. The several 3 in one NES, SNES, and Genesis consoles with HDMI output sell for around $75-$100 on EBAY and other websites (These are the best option since they have 3 videogame cartridge slots from one videogame console). However other people prefer to do an internal HDMI upgrade to their original NES console that they have had since 1985+. The original 1985 NES can do native HDMI with no anlaog to digital conversion if one internally modifies their NES console for HDMI. I am wondering if it would be possible to make a HDMI graphics card that would plug into the bottom NES 48 pin expansion port since there is direct access to some of the pins on the CPU. Bypass the NTSC composite video and audio pins on the connector and use the + 5 volts, ground, and accessing some of the CPU pins might result in creating an interface to an external HDMI graphics card chip compatible to the NES, without needing to open the console up. +-------\ +5V -- |01 48| -- +5V Gnd -- |02 47| -- Gnd Audio in -> |03 46| -- NC /NMI <- |04 45| -> out 2 ($4016 write data, bit 2) A15 <- |05 44| -> out 1 ($4016 write data, bit 1) EXP9 ?? |06 43| -> out 0 ($4016 write data, bit 0, strobe on sticks) EXP8 ?? |07 42| ?? EXP0 EXP7 ?? |08 41| ?? EXP1 EXP6 ?? |09 40| ?? EXP2 EXP5 ?? |10 39| ?? EXP3 ($4017 read strobe) /OE for joypad 2 <- |11 38| ?? EXP4 joypad 1 D1 -> |12 37| -> /OE for joypad 1 ($4016 read strobe) joypad 1 D3 xx |13 36| xx joypad 1 D4 /IRQ <> |14 35| xx joypad 1 D0 joypad 2 D2 -> |15 34| -> duplicate of pin 37 joypad 2 D3 xx |16 33| <- joypad 1 D2 duplicate of pin 11 <- |17 32| <> CPU D0 joypad 2 D4 xx |18 31| <> CPU D1 joypad 2 D0 xx |19 30| <> CPU D2 joypad 2 D1 -> |20 29| <> CPU D3 Video out <- |21 28| <> CPU D4 Audio out <- |22 27| <> CPU D5 unregulated power adapter vdd -- |23 26| <> CPU D6 4.00MHz CIC CLK <- |24 25| <> CPU D7 +-------/ https://wiki.nesdev.com/w/index.php/Expansion_port
  4. If one needs a replacement power supply for their Mattel Intellivision II videogame system, then the best 100% compatible power supply to get is the TRIAD WAU160-750 that was engineered in the USA and made in China using high quality materials. I used this power supply 24 x 7 for around 30 days while stress testing the Mattel Intellivision II videogame system. As of February 10th 2016, all external power supplies manufactured for use in the United States and imported into the United States is required to have the energy efficiency level VI rating per the Department of Energy law. Dealers in the United State that have old stock of power supplies, are allowed under the law to sell their old stock of power supplies as long as those power supplies were manufactured and imported into the United States before Feb 10th 2016. In 2020 many AC to DC power supplies one purchases online are level VI complaint. However AC to AC power supplies are not in demand, since most modern consumer products in the 21st Century use AC to DC power supplies, therefore there are some USA dealers that still have old stock of AC to AC power supplies that they imported into the United States before February 10th 2016, that they are trying to get rid off at clearance prices. However, there are also many third-party companies producing both AC to AC and AC to DC external power supplies that are made in China, and violating the Department of Energy level VI compliant rules put in place back in February 10th 2016. *** I have done a massive amount of research and as far as I aware the TRIAD Magnetics company is the only company that makes AC to AC external power supplies that have the required energy efficiency level VI defined by the DOE Docket Number EERE-2008-BT-STD-0005-0219. *** TRIAD engineers the power supplies in the United States and has the power supplies made in China using very high-quality parts and material. While external AC to DC power supplies that are level VI complaint started appearing on the USA market in late 2015 or early 2016, the first TRIAD AC to AC level VI complaint power supplies started appearing on the USA market around January 24th 2017. Here is the detailed spec sheet for the TRIAD WAU160-750 that is ideal for use with the Mattel Intellivision II videogame system. The cheapest price for the TRIAD WAU160-750 is around $20-$25 when purchased online. This is a heavy transformer based power supply since light weight switching based consumer AC to AC power supplies have not been invented yet and might never be invented because of lack of demand for AC to AC power supplies. While this power supply can cost between $20-25, at the time of this post Arrow website is currently selling the TRIAD WAU160-750 for $13.40 plus tariffs and free shipping with orders of around $50. However important information: Since this TRIAD WAU160-750 power supply has a 2.1mm plug on it you need a 2.1mm female to 2.5mm male adapter plug in order to use the power supply on the Intellivision II videogame console. This adapter plug for $1.97 with free shipping works fine on the Intellivision II videogame console. So the only real negatives regarding this TRIAD power supply when compared to the original Mattel power supply is that the cord on the TRIAD according to the spec sheet is listed as 6 feet (but I actually mine ended up being around 6 feet 7 inches). Where as the Mattel 5872-9629 power cord length was 9 feet 8 inches. The other negative is currently all level VI AC to AC power supplies on the market only have 2.1mm size plugs. So a adapter plug is needed to interface the TRIAD WAU160-750 to the Intellivision II style of plug which is 2.5mm. Now one can order a custom 2.5mm x 5.5mm x 11mm plug for the TRIAD WAU160-750, but the catch is the factory in China requires a minimum order of 500 power supplies. *** This is a top of the line power supply for the Mattel Intellivision II videogame console. This power supply has excellent build quality. *** This is a factory new 100% compatible power supply for the Mattel Intellivision II videogame system. This is a high-end replacement power supply for the Mattel Intellivision II videogame system. This power supply is a high-quality consumer AC power supply that is designed for North America and has an input voltage of 120 volts AC at 60Hz. Rated output voltage is 16 volts AC at 0.75 amps. Since all consumer AC to AC power supplies on the market use unregulated voltage designs, there is a load curve from zero to full load. When this power supply is connected to the Mattel Intellivision II videogame system it will output the proper volage when under a load just like the original Mattel Intellivision II videogame system power supply. More information about this can be found in the Questions and Answers section of this listing. Power supply has UL listed safety certification for the United States market and CUL safety certification for the Canadian markets (UL safety certificate number E341931). Efficiency Level VI certified by the Department of Energy (DOE): Consuming up to 25% less power than previous 60 Hertz AC power supplies, this line of AC power supplies was among the first to meet the U.S. Department of Energy’s Level VI efficiency standard. This is slightly larger than similar products of lesser efficiency, as higher-grade core materials are needed to meet the Level VI requirements. RoHS Complaint power supply Engineered in the United States and made in China using high quality materials. Output cord is 6 feet long. 10 year warranty offered directly by the manufacture of the power supply. Questions and Answers Question: What Mattel products is this power supply compatible with? Answer: This power supply is for use only with the Mattel Intellivision II videogame system and attached hardware components designed for that system. When the Mattel Intellivoice Voice Synthesis Module and Mattel System Changer are connected to the Intellivision II, this power supply will power those connected devices also. However, this power supply is not compatible with the original Intellivision videogame system since that system has its own built in power supply. Question: How does the quality of this third-party AC to AC power supply compare to my original Mattel Intellivision II power supply model number 5872-9629? Answer: This power supply is slightly better quality when compared to the original Mattel power supply. There have been major improvements in the design of AC to DC power supplies over the last 40+ years, however in the last 40+ years there has only been minor improvements when it comes to AC to AC power supplies. In fact, finding an AC to AC power supply on the market is rare since many companies have decided to only make DC power supplies. This AC to AC power supply is UL listed which is a safety certification for the USA market. In addition, this power supply has the Canadian CUL safety certification. This power supply has the required Energy Efficiency Level VI certification by the Department of Energy (DOE). This power supply is RoHS complaint too. Currently this is the only level VI approved AC power supply on the North American market that will work with the Mattel Intellivision II videogame system. Question: One of my original Mattel Intellivision II 5872-9629 power supplies has a label on it that says it outputs 16.2 volts AC at 0.955 amps. The other Mattel Intellivision II 5872-9629 power supply has a label on it that says it outputs 16.7 volts AC at 1 amp. Why does this third-party power supply have a label on it that says it outputs 16 volts AC at 0.75 amps? Answer: Unregulated AC to AC power supplies are much more complicated when compared to regulated AC to DC power supplies that most people normally use. All consumer AC to AC power supplies on the market have unregulated designs, which means there is a load curve from zero load to full load. For example, the original Mattel Intellivision II 5872-9629 power supply label on it says 16.2 volts AC at 0.955 amps, and under real world conditions has a no-load voltage of around 18.46 volts AC. When the Mattel Intellivision II 5872-9629 power supply is under a load from the Intellivision II console, it is outputting around 17.69 volts AC and around 17.37 volts AC when the voice synthesis module is connected. When the Mattel 5872-9629 power supply is connected to the Intellivision II, it never outputs 16.2 volts AC, and will always output around 17.69 volts AC and around 17.37 volts AC when under a load. The only way to get the original unregulated Mattel 5872-9629 AC power supply to output 16.2 volts AC or around 16 volts AC would be to disconnect it from the Mattel Intellivision II and place it on a actual hardware device that would draw around 0.955 amps, then the voltage would drop down to around 16 volts or 16.2 volts AC because of the load curve. This third-party power supply that has a label on it that says 16 volts AC at 0.75 amps works perfectly with the Intellivision II and according to the load curve data is a perfect match. For example, this third-party power supply according to the specs has a voltage rating of 20 volts AC when there is no load (zero current draw). Under real world conditions I measured around 19.64 volts AC when there is no load. However as soon as the Mattel Intellivision II is drawing a load, this power supply outputs around 17.82 volts AC and around 17.32 volts AC when the voice synthesis module is connected. Around 17.82 volts AC and around 17.32 volts AC is the proper voltage to use with the Mattel Intellivision II and is almost a perfect match according to the load curve data. 24 x 7 for around 30 days using two separate Mattel Intellivision II systems with two separate voice synthesis modules attached to each system, I tested this third-party power supply. Everything worked perfectly fine on both Intellivision II videogame systems. Using this power supply, the Mattel Intellivision II when the voice synthesis module is connected will not drop below 17.32 volts AC while under a load. This third-party AC power supply because of the unregulated voltage curve will only output around 16 volts AC when under a full load of 0.75 amps, and the Intellivision II videogame system never draws that much current even when its massively loaded with hardware. Since the original Mattel Intellivision II power supply outputs around 17.37 volts AC when the voice synthesis module is attached, this third party power supply with a voltage output of around 17.32 volts AC is almost a perfect match. Question: Why does this third-party power supply offer around 0.25 amps less when compared to the original Mattel 5872-9629 power supply? Answer: Back in 2015 there use to be 16 volt AC to AC power supplies in production that had 2 amp capacity and 1 amp capacity. At the end of the year 2015 all 16 volt AC power supplies designed for the USA consumer market went out of production, and when the new Feb 2016 level VI energy efficiency law went into effect by the Department of Energy, AC to AC power supply companies decided to design only 16 volt AC to AC power supplies with a maximum capacity of 0.75 amps for the consumer market. It is technically possible for a power supply company to make a level VI approved 16 volt AC to AC power supply that has a 1 amp capacity output, however it would cost around $15,000 to get such a power supply UL tested. Because of the lack of demand for AC to AC power supplies there is a possibility that no company will every make a 16 volt AC to AC power supply with a 1 amp capacity that is level VI rated. The premium materials and overdesign required to meet Level VI makes the parts more expensive. Also, the $15,000 investment for UL testing makes it hard for power supply companies to justify designing a second generation of higher capacity level VI approved AC to AC power supplies. However, I have verified that the Mattel Intellivision II videogame console fully loaded with hardware devices uses only a small amount of the 0.75 amp capacity on this third party power supply. This third party power supply is an ideal power supply for use with the Intellivision II videogame console. Question: My original Mattel 5872-9629 power supply does not need an adapter plug. Why do I need to purchase an adapter plug for this third-party power supply? Is the original Mattel 5879-9629 power supply a better power supply to use with my Intellivision II? Answer: Currently all level VI rated AC to AC power supplies are only offered with the standard barrel plug size of 2.1 x 5.5 x 11mm, and the Mattel Intellivision II videogame console requires a plug size of 2.5 x 5.5 x 11mm. Yes, in the ideal world not having to use an adapter plug with a power supply would be ideal, however to special order this third-party power supply with a custom 2.5 x 5.5 x 11mm plug, the factory in China would require a minimum order of 500 power supplies to make that change to a custom size plug. While there exists third party companies in the USA that under ideal conditions for a fee can cut off the 2.1 x 5.5 x 11mm plug at the end of the cord and mold on a new custom 2.5 x 5.5 x 11mm plug, however the minimum QTY required for that modification is between 50-100 power supplies. This third-party power supply is slightly better quality when compared to the original Mattel power supply, however since one does not need to use an adapter plug on the original Mattel power supply, then for this reason the Mattel power supply is an overall better power supply to use with the Intellivision II. The main purpose of this third power supply is to offer a replacement power supply for those that need a new power supply for their Intellivision II videogame console, since the old original Mattel early 80’s model is out of production. Question: Can I use this power supply with other products that I own that need 16 volts AC and what would happen if the current draw on the device I connect to this power supply starts to draw more than 0.75 amps? Answer: Because of the load curve on all consumer unregulated AC power supplies, one needs to be careful with the products they use this power supply with. The load curve for this power supply under real word conditions is between 19.64 volts to 16 volts AC. This third party power supply will only output around 16 volts AC when the load is 0.75 amps. Since the Mattel Intellivision II videogame console with the voice synthesis module attached draws a small amount of the 0.75 amp power supply capacity, then this third party power supply outputs around 17.32 volts AC when used with that Mattel product. However, one should never use this power supply with a product that requires more than 0.75 amps, since the voltage would drop below 16 volts AC and destroy the power supply. Unregulated AC power supplies have a small safety margin where the fuse in the power supply will not open if there is a brief current draw that goes over 0.75 amps for only a few seconds. AC to AC transformers are not designed for the user to exceed the output current. Given an overload condition, they will start to heat-up and internal built-in safety mechanisms (fuse) will open, permanently destroying the power supply. These power supplies are sealed at the factory and were not designed to be opened up for a user to replace the fuse, also the 10-year manufactory warranty would most likely not be honored if the consumer abused the power supply and went over the stated current of 0.75 amps. Question: Why is this power supply only offered in North America, what if I wanted to use this power supply on 220 volts at 50Hz? Answer: This power supply would be permanently destroyed and the internal fuse would blow if connected to 220 volts at 50Hz. All consumer AC to AC power supplies are made for either 120 volts AC at 60Hz or 220 volts AC at 50Hz. In the 21st Century major technological advances have been made on worldwide regulated AC to DC power supplies that work between 100-240 volts AC at 50-60Hz. However, because of that lack of consumer demand for unregulated AC to AC power supplies being used in the 21st Century, the research and development costs have not been spent to make AC to AC power supplies work worldwide between 100-240 volt AC at 50-60Hz. Therefore, all consumer AC to AC power supplies for the North America market are still designed to only work with 120 volts at 60Hz. There are power supply companies in Europe that do make AC to AC power supplies that work at only 220 volts at 50Hz, and one might be able to locate one that works with the Mattel Intellivision II videogame console.
  5. If one needs a replacement power supply for their Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module), then the best 100% compatible power supply to get is the TRIAD WAU090-1200 that was engineered in the USA and made in China using high quality materials. I used this power supply 24 x 7 for around 30 days while stress testing the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module). As of February 10th 2016, all external power supplies manufactured for use in the United States and imported into the United States is required to have the energy efficiency level VI rating per the Department of Energy law. Dealers in the United State that have old stock of power supplies, are allowed under the law to sell their old stock of power supplies as long as those power supplies were manufactured and imported into the United States before Feb 10th 2016. In 2020 many AC to DC power supplies one purchases online are level VI complaint. However AC to AC power supplies are not in demand, since most modern consumer products in the 21st Century use AC to DC power supplies, therefore there are some USA dealers that still have old stock of AC to AC power supplies that they imported into the United States before February 10th 2016, that they are trying to get rid off at clearance prices. However, there are also many third-party companies producing both AC to AC and AC to DC external power supplies that are made in China, and violating the Department of Energy level VI compliant rules put in place back in February 10th 2016. *** I have done a massive amount of research and as far as I aware the TRIAD Magnetics company is the only company that makes AC to AC external power supplies that have the required energy efficiency level VI defined by the DOE Docket Number EERE-2008-BT-STD-0005-0219. *** TRIAD engineers the power supplies in the United States and has the power supplies made in China using very high quality parts and material. While external AC to DC power supplies that are level VI complaint started appearing on the USA market in late 2015 or early 2016, the first TRIAD AC to AC level VI complaint power supplies started appearing on the USA market around January 24th 2017. Here is the detailed spec sheet for the TRIAD WAU090-1200 that is ideal for use with the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module). The cheapest price for the TRIAD WAU090-1200 is around $20-$25 when purchased online. This is a heavy transformer based power supply since light weight switching based consumer AC to AC power supplies have not been invented yet and might never be invented because of lack of demand for AC to AC power supplies. At the time of this post Newark sells the TRIAD WAU090-1200 for $19.63 each plus free shipping on orders over $150. Another dealer called Mouser Electronics has the TRIAD WAU090-1200 for $16.36 + $7.99 for shipping (total price around $24.35). *** This is a top of the line power supply for the Mattel Intellivision Computer adapter (computer module). This power supply has excellent build quality. *** This is a factory new 100% compatible power supply for the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module). This is a high-end replacement power supply for the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module). This power supply is a high-quality consumer AC power supply that is designed for North America and has an input voltage of 120 volts AC at 60Hz. Rated output voltage is 9 volts AC at 1.2 amps. Since all consumer AC to AC power supplies on the market use unregulated voltage designs, there is a load curve from zero to full load. When this power supply is connected to the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module) it will output the proper 10 volts AC at up to 1 amp just like the original Mattel power supply. More information about this can be found in the Questions and Answers section of this listing. Power supply has UL listed safety certification for the United States market and CUL safety certification for the Canadian markets (UL safety certificate number E341931). Efficiency Level VI certified by the Department of Energy (DOE): Consuming up to 25% less power than previous 60 Hertz AC power supplies, this line of AC power supplies was among the first to meet the U.S. Department of Energy’s Level VI efficiency standard. This is slightly larger than similar products of lesser efficiency, as higher-grade core materials are needed to meet the Level VI requirements. RoHS Complaint power supply Engineered in the United States and made in China using high quality materials. Output cord is 6 feet long. 10 year warranty offered directly by the manufacture of the power supply. Questions and Answers Question: Will this power supply power the Intellivision and Intellivision II videogame system? Answer: No, this power supply only powers the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module). Mattel designed the Intellivision to use its own internal power supply and the Intellivision II uses a different external power supply. In fact, as a safety feature Mattel made the power plug on the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module) a different size so that one does not by accident plug the Intellivision II unregulated 16.2-16.7 volts AC power supply into the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module), since the computer module requires around 10 volts AC. Therefore, when using the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module), ones needs to use both the computer adapter power supply along with their existing power supply that they are currently using with the Intellivision and Intellivision II. Question: How does the quality of this third-party AC to AC power supply compare to my original Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module) power supply? Answer: This power supply is slightly better quality when compared to the original Mattel power supply. There have been major improvements in the design of AC to DC power supplies over the last 40+ years, however in the last 40+ years there has only been minor improvements when it comes to AC to AC power supplies. In fact, finding an AC to AC power supply on the market is rare since many companies have decided to only make DC power supplies. This AC to AC power supply is UL listed which is a safety certification for the USA market. In addition, this power supply has the Canadian CUL safety certification. This power supply has the required Energy Efficiency Level VI certification by the Department of Energy (DOE). This power supply is RoHS complaint too. Currently this is the only level VI approved AC power supply on the North American market that will work with the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module). Question: It is very hard to locate the out of production Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module) power supply online, however on various websites the specs are listed as 10 volts AC at 1 amps. Why does this third-party power supply have a label on it that says it outputs 9 volts AC at 1.2 amps? Answer: At the end of the year 2015 all 10 volt AC power supplies designed for the USA consumer market went out of production, and when the new Feb 2016 level VI energy efficiency law went into effect by the Department of Energy, AC to AC power supply companies decided to design only 6,9,12,16,20, and 24 volts AC models that are level VI rated. Unregulated AC to AC power supplies are much more complicated when compared to regulated AC to DC power supplies that most people normally use. All consumer AC to AC power supplies on the market have unregulated designs, which means there is a load curve from zero load to full load. For example, this third-party power supply according to the specs has a voltage rating of 11.6 volts AC when there is no load (zero current draw). Under real world conditions I measured around 11.09 volts AC when there is no load. However as soon as the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module) is drawing a load, this power supply outputs around 10.38 volts AC and around 9.84 volts AC when the voice synthesis module is connected. Around 10.38 volts AC and around 9.84 volts AC is the proper voltage to use with the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module). 24 x 7 for around 30 days I ran the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module) with the voice synthesis module attached and everything worked perfectly fine. Using this power supply, the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module) when the voice synthesis module is connected will not drop below 9.84 volts AC while under a 1 amp load. This third-party AC power supply because of the unregulated voltage curve will only output around 9 volts AC when under a full load of 1.2 amps. Question: Can I use this power supply with other products that I own that need 9 volts AC and what would happen if the current draw on the device I connect to this power supply starts to draw more than 1.2 amps? Answer: Because of the load curve on all consumer unregulated AC power supplies, one needs to be careful with the products they use this power supply with. The load curve for this power supply under real word conditions is between 11.09 volts to 9 volts AC. This power supply will only output around 9 volts AC when the load is 1.2 amps. Since the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module) with the voice synthesis module attached never draws more then 1 amps of power, then this power supply puts out around 9.84 volts AC when used with that Mattel product. However, one should never use this power supply with a product that requires more than 1.2 amps, since the voltage would drop below 9 volts AC and destroy the power supply. Unregulated AC power supplies have a small safety margin where the fuse in the power supply will not open if there is a brief current draw that goes over the 1.2 amps for only a few seconds. AC to AC transformers are not designed for the user to exceed the output current. Given an overload condition, they will start to heat-up and internal built-in safety mechanisms (fuse) will open, permanently destroying the power supply. These power supplies are sealed at the factory and were not designed to be opened up for a user to replace the fuse, also the 10-year manufactory warranty would most likely not be honored if the consumer abused the power supply and went over the stated current of 1.2 amps. Question: Why is this power supply only offered in North America, what if I wanted to use this power supply on 220 volts at 50Hz? Answer: This power supply would be permanently destroyed and the internal fuse would blow if connected to 220 volts at 50Hz. All consumer AC to AC power supplies are made for either 120 volts AC at 60Hz or 220 volts AC at 50Hz. In the 21st Century major technological advances have been made on worldwide regulated AC to DC power supplies that work between 100-240 volts AC at 50-60Hz. However, because of that lack of consumer demand for unregulated AC to AC power supplies being used in the 21st Century, the research and development costs have not been spent to make AC to AC power supplies work worldwide between 100-240 volt AC at 50-60Hz. Therefore, all consumer AC to AC power supplies for the North America market are still designed to only work with 120 volts at 60Hz. There are power supply companies in Europe that do make AC to AC power supplies that work at only 220 volts at 50Hz, and one might be able to locate one that works with the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module).
  6. On the Intellivision computer module there is 5 jacks on the back. One jack is the POWER jack which powers the system with an external power supply, then there is the AUX jack which allows one to hook up a printer, then there is the OUT TO TAPE and IN FROM TAPE jacks which allows one to record and read programs on an old fashion analog cassette recorder, or similar recording device. However, the owners guide does not mention what the 5th jack on the back is for. There is a jack on the back that says REMOTE. Does anyone know what the REMOTE jack on the computer module is for and was the REMOTE Jack every used by any company.
  7. In the 21st Century we have regulated DC power supplies that are better quality when compared to unregulated DC power supplies found on some computer and videogame systems in the 1970’s, 1980’s, and 1990’s. Also, in the 21st Century all modern DC power supplies accept an input voltage between 100-240 volts AC at 50/60Hz. All current modern AC power supplies only work on either 120 volts or 220 volts and are not dual voltage for worldwide use. It would be possible to create a new state of the art power supply for the TI-99 series computers and the Spectravideo 318 and 328 computer systems AC power supplies are harder to find and they also are much more complicated when compared to DC power supplies. The best UL listed AC power supplies offered for the consumer market in 2020 are all single voltage output transformers that also have the required level VI DOE rating. However even in the year 2020 the best AC power supplies are unregulated and drop in voltage as the amp draw from the device increases. There is no modern off the shelf AC power supply that will work with the TI-99 series computers and Spectravideo 318 and 328 computer systems. I believe I can use two separate power supplies like a 16 volts AC power supply and a second 9 volts AC power supply connected to the special wire harness, and since its level VI approved by the DOE, it should work and would be legal for resell. However, the original TI-99 and Spectravideo computers use a single wall transformer that outputs two separate AC voltages, which is better for the consumer. So even though one can legally sell two wall adapters wired to one wire harness that is level VI, it would be a downgrade compared to what people in the 80’s were using for AC transformers. In the 21st Century since all or almost all modern electronic products are using low voltage DC voltage, new AC power supplies are not in demand. Therefore, companies are not spending the money to do research and development on improving AC wall power supplies and AC desktop power supplies. It is technically possible with research and development to create a new style of AC power supply that could be used for the TI-99 series computers and Spectravideo 318 and 328 computer systems. Specs that could be done for a new state of the art 21st Century AC power supply (1) The new AC power supply would have a regulated 16 volts AC output and a regulated 9 volts or 8 volts AC output. The 16 volts AC and 9 volts AC would remain the same regulated voltage regardless of the current load anywhere between 0 to 3 amps. This would be a major improvement since an unregulated AC power supply today drops in voltage each time the load increases. With a new state of the art regulated AC power supply 16 volts and 9 volts output would occur regardless if the load is 3 amps, 2 amps, 1 amps, 0.5 amps, or 0 amps. (2) The dual voltage AC output power supply needs to be able to operate on both 115V 50/60Hz and 230V 50/60Hz and be auto sensing/switching to the applied input voltage between 100-240 volts. And have a detachable 3 pole or 2 pole AC inlet socket that allows one to plug in their own style of country power cord. This is a feature that is only found on DC power supplies, but a similar design could be ported over to a new AC power supply. (3) The power supply would need to be UL listed, FCC certified/tested, CE safety for Europe, and level VI energy efficiency. I have been in communications with some power supply companies regarding making a custom state of the art AC to AC power supply. While many power supply companies require a minimum order of 2,000 power supplies, I located one company that would take a minimum order of 500 power supplies. However, the estimated research and development cost on a new state of the art AC power supply would cost between $10,000-$15,000+. Then it would cost another $15,000+ for UL listing plus the fees for FCC, CE, and level VI DOE. So, one might be looking at around $30,000+ just to complete the research and development costs with the safety certifications like UL listed. The cheapest UL listed and level VI unregulated AC power supply with single voltage output costs around $20 after shipping. A new state of the art regulated desktop dual output AC power supply might have a list price of around $50. I think I am going to put this project on hold since there is a minimum order of 500 power supplies after one completes the research and development cost. I am not sure there would be enough worldwide demand for such a project. I would rather spend $30,000-$40,000+ on remodeling my home theater setup in the future. Maybe one day I could sell some stocks at a big profit to fund this project or similar projects. Supporting these 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s videogame and computer systems is not profitable. For any power supply project, if one makes a very small change to a existing very cheap AC or DC wall power supply on the market, even if the change does not require any research and development costs, there is a $15,000+ fee just to get the optional UL certification feature on the power supply before it is ran off the assembly line at the factories located in China and other places in the world. That is why some power supply companies when they came out with the new required level VI DOE power supplies back in 2016, decided to make their products only UL recognized material in the specs and decided not to pay $15,000+ to get the product UL listed. So many power supplies online from various websites are no longer UL listed because of the cost involved and instead use UL recognized material which has no fee.
  8. Thanks for the information, my Coleco ADAM is looking much better with the 3.5 inch 1.44MB disk drives, SD drives, and Digital Data Drives.
  9. Thanks for the information. The plastic access door on one of my Intellivoice modules was glued shut, but on another Intellivoice module was easier to remove and put back on without damaging the plastic cover. However, on the Intellivision Computer adapter the top door is so tight that slight prying on the door will not open it since it must be glued shut. The link to the thread you provided mentioned that only on a few of the computer adapters did Mattel decide to place a memory expansion connector on the motherboard, and its my understanding that the expansion door is not glued down and easier to open for those with the rare connector on the computer adapter. My door is glued down so tight on the computer adapter, that if I place any more force on the door, I think it will break the plastic. Yes I could go in from the bottom and take the entire computer adapter apart. However, its my understanding that the memory expansion connector on the motherboard exists on a small amount of the computer adapters that were made, and that most likely this is why Mattel never mentioned the feature in the owner’s manual. It does not make any logical sense to offer the expansion port on some of the systems and not on others. Even if 10% to 50% of the computer adapters have the expansion connector, since no third party company makes a memory expansion for the Mattel computer adapter, there is no real reason to try and access it. This would have been a real nightmare for Mattel if they would have released a product for the expansion port on the small amount of computer adapters that have the connector. The first issue would be its so hard to gain access to where the expansion port is suppose to be located, the second issue customers would be upset if their computer adapter was lacking the connector do to some cost cutting measures to not include the connector on most of the computer adapter motherboards that went into production. Now the good thing about the Voice Synthesis Module, is that 100% of them have the top expansion connector. According to the link you gave me, Mattel planned on coming out with a hardware device that plugged in to the top of the Voice Synthesis Module, that would add wireless hand controllers to the Intellivision. Also pin 6 on the connector for the Voice Synthesis Module allows an external power supply to be connected to replace the current power supply or be a power supply booster to offer more power to the video consoles hardware. Therefore, a third party company could today make a little box that plugs into the Voice Synthesis Module top connector, and that box could offer 2 or 4 DB9 standard controller jacks and also at the same time offer a wireless controller option for the Mattel system. Since the box would be a powered box, it could also boost the power supply capabilities of the Intellivision. Then anyone that wanted to use wired DB9 hand controllers or special new wireless hand controllers on their Intellivision system, would just need to own the Intellivoice module, which is a fairly common device that can be found on EBAY, etc.
  10. Under real world conditions comparing the exact same videogame titles on the ATARI 5200 and Commodore 64, I prefer the quality of the ColecoVision/ADAM versions. The ADAM version of Donkey Kong has all 4 screens and perhaps the only system that has all 5 screens for Donkey Kong Junior (bonus 5th screen that was not even in the arcade was leaked by a Coleco employee to the ADAM community, the released version has 4 screens). While the Nintendo Entertainment system that came out in North America in October of 1985 was more powerful than the ColecoVision, for some reason it did not have all the screens for Donkey Kong. It is my understanding that in the year 2010 a special version of Donkey Kong for the NES was released that contained all the screens, but I have never played that version. When comparing videogames side by side to the ColecoVision and the Atari 5200, I prefer the ColecoVision versions. The ATARI 5200 only sold over 1 million consoles and was not as popular, where as the ColecoVision videogame system sold over 2 million consoles and over 500,000 ADAM computer systems. However even though the graphics were not as good on the Intellivision when compared to the ColecoVision, I did notice that the Intellivision was a more popular system since it sold over 3 million videogame consoles. We did have a few ColecoVision games that used speech in the videogames without a voice module. The sound is really good on the Intellivision even without the speech module. The Intellivision voice Synthesizer module is very nice, I noticed that many Intellivision videogames have detailed speech compared to only a few videogames with speech on the ColecoVision videogame system. Every system has its plusses and minuses. There are a lot of interesting videogames and a lot sports games for the Intellivision. If the Intellivision would have had more arcade classics like the ATARI 2600, then ATARI would not have been as popular. The Intellivision came out in 1979. The ATARI 2600 had a two-year head start in the videogame market which is why it sold over 30 million consoles between 1977 to 2004. Plus there was a massive amount of companies that made ATARI 2600 adapters since many people wanted to be able to play ATARI 2600 videogames on their Intellivision, ColecoVision/ADAM, ATARI 5200, and many other systems that support ATARI 2600 videogame cartridges. Some detailed Intellivision videogame system comments Thanks for the information regarding the Sears Super Video Arcade system. The detachable controller feature on the Sears Super Video Arcade makes the system better than the original Intellivision since one can unplug a defective controller and replace the controller without having to take the system apart to replace a controller. The problem is there is a lack of replacement controllers and repair services for the existing Intellivision systems when it comes to the game controllers (maybe one day that could change). Too bad Mattel or some other company does not make replacement controllers for the Sears Super Video Arcade, Intellivision II, and the hardwired Intellivision. On top of the Intellivoice module I noticed that there is an expansion interface that is covered by a plastic cover, but it is my understanding that it was never used. Perhaps it was to add more voice chips or ram in the future. It is extremely hard to remove the plastic cover sometimes without damaging it. On one Intellivoice module, that plastic cover easily pops on and off, however on another Intellivoice module the cover is very hard to get off without damaging it. There must have been different versions of the Intellivoice module made when it comes to how easy it is to remove the plastic cover. While the 1983 Intellivision computer module will work with all Intellivision’s, since its white in color it was mainly designed for use with the Intellivision II videogame system, since cosmetically it matches with that console the best. I was not aware that the Intellivision computer module has a top memory expansion port (which no company has every designed a memory expander for the expansion port to my knowledge). The expansion port is not mentioned at all in the official Mattel owner’s guide either. https://archive.org/details/Intellivision_Computer_Module_Owners_Guide_1983_Mattel_US/mode/2up There appears to be a small 1 inch wide area on top of the computer module that appears like it might open up. However, I tried prying it open gently, and it did not open. I am not going to give it anymore force since I am afraid the plastic cover might break off and be damaged. I will just leave the cover on, I just wanted to look at the expansion port, but it is on the console too tight and these computer modules are rare and I do not want to damage the plastic. Anyways to my knowledge there exists no third party memory expanders to plug into the slot. On the ATARI 5200, ColecoVision, ADAM, all the expansion ports are easy to get to without damaging the plastic cover. I wish Mattel would have made a better design for the plastic cover on the voice module and computer module. The computer module is the worse when it comes to trying to remove the top cover.
  11. I was an original owner of the ColecoVision in August/September of 1982, and the main reason I purchased the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer in October of 1983 was so that I could play Supergames like Buck Rodgers since the ADAM had the built in SGM module using videogames with up to 256K of storage in 1983 was amazing state of the art system. Yes it costs around $800 ($200 for the ColecoVision and $600 for the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer, but for dedicated videogame fans that also wanted to have their first computer system it was worth it). Coleco also offered the ADAM in a standalone version with the only advantage of having a built in composite video output for those that had TV/monitors with a composite video input. Many early videogame systems lacked a expansion module interface for a computer, and many systems used the cartridge slot for expansion. Take a look at the IntelliVision II videogame console and the space it takes up for all its modules that plug into the cartridge slot. The ADAM was more power system with a real keyboard and with not only a cartridge slot but 4 separate expansion slots (1 external and 3 internal). For a 1983 computer system the ADAM was amazing system that also offered the most powerful videogames when compared to all other systems.
  12. While growing up as a kid, back in late 1977 I remember playing with an ATARI 2600 videogame system in a retail store while my parents shopped in a different area of the store. The ATARI 2600 was much better when compared to those pong game consoles that had no cartridge slot. The ATARI 2600 had game cartridges which was an awesome new concept for 1977 (Fairchild Channel F in 1976 was the very first videogame system that used rom cartridges). When the IntelliVision was released in 1979 it was not on display in any retail stores in the state I was living in, however in 1980 I got a chance to play with the IntelliVision for the first time in a retail store. I noticed that the IntelliVision home videogame system had better graphics quality and better sound quality when compared to the Atari 2600 videogame system. Also the controllers had more functions like 16 directions and a keypad. Around the year 1981 I spent a lot of time comparing the ATARI 2600 to the IntelliVision in catalogs and retail stores, however there was something missing in terms of arcade quality from both systems. I really liked the IntelliVision system which had better graphics and sound when compared to the ATARI 2600, however I was disappointed in the lack of arcade videogame titles with the IntelliVision. The IntelliVision appeared to have its own unique videogames. The ATARI 2600 had many classic arcade videogames, but on some of the games (actually many), the graphics and sound was not like the arcade. My parents around 1981 offered to buy me either an Atari 2600 or IntelliVision console, but to make a very long story short I could not decide on which system to purchase. I then leaned in late 1981 or early 1982, that in August 1982 the ColecoVision videogame system was coming out, and it also played ATARI 2600 videogames with the Expansion Module #1 adapter. The ColecoVision also had a joystick with a keypad controller just like the IntelliVision. Also the specs on the ColecoVision were better then even the IntelliVision. Therefore, my very first brand new videogame system that I ended up owning was the ColecoVision in August/September of 1982 for around $200. Then in October of 1983 for around $600 I owned the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer system. Around one month ago I purchased a used IntelliVision II with the computer adapter Around one month ago I purchased a used IntelliVision II with the computer adapter. Its been around 40 years since I have played IntelliVision videogames. Both the IntelliVision and IntelliVision II has an RCA RF output jack on the console itself, which allows the consumer to use any length of RCA to RG-6 cord between 3 feet and 100 feet (just like the ColecoVision/ADAM). However, it is disappointing that the original IntelliVision has the AC power cord hardwired inside the console, they should have made the AC cord detachable in case it gets damaged (transformer is built inside the videogame console). The IntelliVision II power supply is detachable from the console which is nice. Also, the IntelliVision II videogame controllers are detachable and are not hardwired into the videogame console like the original IntelliVision (detachable by DB9 on the IntelliVision II is real nice feature). However, I really hate the combination on/off and reset button on the IntelliVision II. I have not used an original 1979 IntelliVision since the early 80’s, however I remember there being a separate push button reset button with a separate sliding on/off switch which is a better design when compared to the IntelliVision II. The IntelliVision II came out in 1983 and was just a smaller, cheaper, and lower cost IntelliVision system that played the exact same games. However, one bad design to make the IntelliVision II cheaper was combining the on/off button with the reset button. While resetting game cartridges is fine, the problem occurs when one wants to turn off the IntelliVision II to switch a different videogame cartridge. One has to hold down the power button for 3 seconds in order to get the IntelliVision II to turn off. A separate sliding on/off power switch like what is found on the original IntelliVision would have been better since there is no 3 second delay. The ColecoVision/ADAM videogame controllers are nicer controllers when compared to the IntelliVision and IntelliVision II controllers, plus the Coleco controllers are easier to repair. One advantage of the IntelliVision and IntelliVision II controllers is that they operate in 16 directions versus 8 directions for many 80’s videogame systems. There appears to be a lack of working and replacement controllers for the IntelliVision and IntelliVision II videogame consoles when compared to other systems like the ColecoVision/ADAM. The ColecoVision and ADAM are some of the rare early 80's systems that have a fancy logo when turning on the videogame system and computer system without a cartridge inserted. The IntelliVision II has no onscreen logo when turned on without a videogame cartridge inserted. There were some exact same videogame titles that were released for both the ATARI 2600 and IntelliVision The IntelliVision and IntelliVision II are the exact same quality in terms of graphics and sound quality (The IntelliVision II is just a smaller and cheaper version of the IntelliVision). While the IntelliVision videogame system is lacking in arcade classics, which is one reason the ATARI 2600 was much more popular, the IntelliVision videogame system outperforms the ATARI 2600 in both graphics and sound quality. For example, Tron Deadly Discs looks much better on the IntelliVision when compared to playing the exact same game on the ATARI 2600. Also, when I compared Night Stalker on the IntelliVision to the ATARI 2600 version called Dark Cavern. The IntelliVision version of Night Stalker clearly is better graphics and sound when compared to the ATARI 2600 (I wish someone would make a ColecoVision version of Night Stalker, since the ColecoVision version would be the best, but some people purchased a IntelliVision or IntelliVision II just to play the classic Night Stalker videogame). However Dark Cavern on the ATARI 2600 is a little differnet compared to Night Stalker on the IntelliVision. While the graphics for Dark Cavern are not as good on the ATARI 2600, I perfer the way the controller operates, also one can reload anytime where as Night Stalker one has to wait until the guy is completley out of ammo before reloading. Over all Night Stalker was more enjoyable when compared to Dark cavern (both games are different and have there pluses and minuses). Also the IntelliVision videogames have fancy game over messages and have a nice polished feel to them when compared to the average ATARI 2600 videogame that feels like its lacking in quality. I really wish Coleco would have made a IntelliVision adapter for the ColecoVision, but they never did (there was rumors that Coleco was planning or considering doing so). In 1982 Mattel released the Voice Synthesis Module, which was an amazing product since the ATARI 2600 videogame system could not produce any voices. However, the ColecoVision was capable of producing voices without any add on voice module, there were a few third-party videogame cartridges that used voices in the games. However, its my understand that those rare videogame cartridges with built in voice took up a lot of space on the game cartridge rom. Perhaps the IntelliVision Voice Synthesis Module allowed for a small amount of space to be taken up for voice videogame cartridges. In later years a third part company called EVE Electronics came out with a Speech Synthesizer for the ADAM computer with built in clock. The Mattel Voice Synthesis Module has a top expansion port that to my knowledge was never used for anything. In 1980 the Mattel Keyboard component was released, but it was not that popular and its estimated that around 4,000 were manufactured. In 1983 Mattel released the computer adapter with Computer Keyboard for the IntelliVision II videogame system. The ATARI 2600 never had a real computer system option; however ATARI did have its own dedicated ATARI computers like that ATARI 400 and ATARI 800 in 1979. The Mattel computer adapter has built in basic program and a built-in music program. However, the Coelco ADAM that was released in October of 1983 is a much more powerful computer system. The IntelliVision II and the computer adapter uses the cartridge slot for expansion, where as the Coleco ADAM has a cartridge slot, and 4 expansion ports (one side expansion and 3 internal expansions). The Coelco ADAM also has a real professional keyboard. Both the ColecoVision and the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer were more powerful videogame and computer systems when compared to Mattel videogames and computer systems. The IntelliVision was clearly the best videogame system to own between 1979-1981 if one wanted graphics and sound above the ATARI 2600 videogames. But because of the lack of arcade classics the 1977 ATARI 2600 was a much more popular videogame system. However, when the 1982 ColecoVision videgame system was released and then the ADAM computer was released in 1983, the ColecoVision/ADAM was the best system to own until late 1985 when the Nintendo videogame system and the Amiga clearly outperformed the ColecoVision/ADAM. Sometimes I wonder what would have happen if Coleco never existed, maybe I would have ended up with a IntelliVision in 1981 instead of a ColecoVision in 1982. Or maybe I would have gone with the ATARI 5200 videogame system in 1982 instead. The ATARI 5200 is a little better than the IntelliVision, and the ColecoVision is a little better than the ATARI 5200. All classic 80’s videogame systems have their pluses and minuses and exclusive videogames that are not offered on any other system.
  13. Canada information regarding power supply options Here is a link to the local Mean Well distributor located in Canada if one decides to just get the detachable plug in ColecoVision power cord only from the United States: https://www.simcona.ca/ United States customers pay around $49.99 plus $9.99 shipping for the 28.5 Watt ColecoVision Power Supply with power cord. However, I see what some people are complaining about when it comes to International shipping rates when it comes to geographical close country like Canada. Canada gets charged $49.99 for the power supply like everyone else in the world, but the cheapest shipping for a 1 pound 8 oz package to Canada by priority mail is $43.25. $43.25 shipping is almost the price of one power supply, so total price to Canada for one power supply is $93.24 after shipping. Now if one wanted two power supplies the price is a little bit cheaper to Canada. Each power supply with cable is going to cost $49.99 each plus to mail around 3 pounds to Canada will cost $46.35 for priority mail shipping. Total cost after shipping for two power supplies would be $146.33 ($73.17 for each power supply including shipping). One can fit a total of 6 power supplies with cables in a Priority mail medium International flat rate box, and the shipping charge for a medium International flat rate box to Canada is $51.55. Plus one can give a 10% discount off the power supply when buying in QTY of 6 ($45 for each power supply). Therefore, total delivery cost on 6 power supplies to Canada would be $321.55 ($53.59 for each power supply after shipping). The power supplies could be sold in Canada on EBAY, Amazon, etc. Other countries like Europe, and Australia would have a little bit higher shipping rates. If one lives around the Canadian border, like Niagara falls city in Ontario Canada and they purchase a lot of items from companies in the United States. They might want to consider renting a Post Office box for one year from the Post Office in Niagara Falls New York or another bordering USA city where they are close too. Then once a month or a few times a year they could pick up packages right across the border in the United States and get charged for US postage rates instead of very expensive international postage rates. Canada is a big country and most people do not live close enough to the USA boarder to justify the drive to the closes Post Office. But renting a Post Office box would save a lot of money if one is a few miles from the USA boarder.
  14. I just verified that a QTY of 20 ColecoVision power cables will fit in one Priority Mail International Padded Flat Rate Envelope. The Post Office charges $26.90 for Canada flat rate envelope and $37.45 for Switzerland. That means that if one charged $14.99 for each ColecoVision power cable. Then to deliver a QTY of 20 to Canada would be a total cost of around $326.70 ($16.34 for each power cable) and the Switzerland price would be a total cost of $337.25 ($16.86 for each power cable). Plus there is custom and duty taxes that might be charged per the laws of ones country they live in. Shipping rates can be calculated at the following website. The reduced International dealer prices can be obtained by sending a private message using the ATARIAGE interface and requesting a PAYPAL invoice. https://postcalc.usps.com/
  15. I will use EBAY as a example. I am not able to see the prices that EBAY is charging people with EBAY’s Global shipping program. The $9.99 that is charged for priority mail shipping to the EBAY shipping center in Kentucky is the cheapest shipping method for the power supply and cable since the shipping weight is around 1 pound and 8 oz. From there EBAY ships the product to anywhere in the world with the global shipping program. What makes this power supply compatible with the ColecoVision is the custom power cord and the sticker that goes on top of the Mean Well power supply. If one were to purchase the Mean Well power supply from an authorized Mean Well dealer in their own country, then one could just purchase the power cord itself on EBAY. If one ships the power cord by first class mail instead of priority mail then it would only cost around $3.00 to ship to the Kentucky EBAY Global shipping center. Then EBAY would charge their Global shipping price. There is not much more one can do if the EBAY and Amazon interface is used, the power supply has to be shipped priority mail because of the weight. The cable could be shipped first class mail instead of priority mail. A cheaper solution would be for someone to request a PAYPAL invoice directly so that Amazon and EBAY can be bypassed (but the request cannot be made using Amazon and EBAY's internal email communication system, but would need to be a third party message system similair to what ATARIAGE website uses for communications).
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