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HDTV1080P

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  1. That is cool, so sometime in the future firmware version 2.0 will be coming out for the Harmony Encore. I have heard of some people reformatting SDXC cards between 32GB to 512GB as FAT32 and it working in most devices that accept a SDHC card. However I have also heard that some brands and models of SDXC cards do not work at all or do not work properly when exFAT is not being used. So exFAT being supported natively would in theory offer almost 100% compatibility with SDXC cards between 32GB to 2TB.
  2. It would be nice to see a firmware update for the Harmony Encore so that all cartridge roms are supported natively without a modification needed, however there is a possibility that the Harmony Encore might be toward the end of support and Firmware version 1.06 might be the last official firmware update which came out around 7 years ago. If we did every get a firmware update I would have liked to seen exFAT with SDXC support between 32GB to 2TB. Also in the future the SD card association plans on releasing SDUC cards with a capacity between 2TB to 128TB. 10 years from now it might be hard to find a SDHC card between 2GB and 32GB and SDXC might be the norm (SDXC requires exFAT in order to work properly).
  3. Thank you very much for that nice detailed Microsoft Word document list for the Arcadia 2001. I should have said in my last post that the Arcadia 2001 does not have name brand popular games like Pacman and Donkey Kong, however Emerson Arcadia does have some less popular arcade games. I wonder how many of these Emerson Arcadia 2001 systems were sold during its 18 month lifespan between May 1982 to 1984. I am guessing under 100,000 videogame systems.
  4. I received my Arcadia 2001 multi-cart on January 29th 2020 (smaller/shorter cartridge shell version). I tested it out and all works good. In the future I would like to see a SD card version of the cartridge or USB multi-cart with on screen menus. This is the first cartridge I have used with DIP switches, and DIP switches are not as good as a on screen menus like ATARIMAX has created for the ColecoVision and Atari 5200 videgame systems. Also, with SD cards one can add new public domain games when released or make their own games that are copied and pasted to the SD card. DIP switch cartridges one can never change the contents of the cartridge. Both the ColecoVision and Arcadia 2001 were released in 1982, and the ColecoVision has much better video and audio quality for its games. Some of the games on the Arcadia 2001 appears to be better than the Intelivision and Atari 2600 games. However, the Emersion Arcadia 2001 does not have any name brand arcade games so it makes it harder to compare to other systems. Overall, I think I like the ATARI 2600 games over the Arcadia 2001. However, I did play a few nice games on the Arcadia 2001 and the graphcis are better than the ATARI 2600 and closer to the Intelivision system. Some games on the Arcadia 2001 require one to use the second hand controller instead of the first hand controller. Overall this Emerson Arcadia 2001 multi-cart is a must have item for people that own this classic 1982 videogame console.
  5. I am on a 100% 1Gbps home network so WI-FI I would not be interested in. I would be interested in a 1Gbps Ethernet jack for the ADAM and also that 12MB memory expansion I would like. A HDMI video card for the ADAM would also be nice. Thanks for posting some of your ideas.
  6. That is awesome that you created an Arcadia 2001 Multi-cart that comes with public domain games and maybe some licensed games that you got permission to distribute. It saves wear and tear on the cartridge slot to use one cartridge with all the games on it. I am looking forward to getting your short version of the cartridge in the near future once you mail them out, then I do not need to swap cartridges anymore.
  7. Those are EBAY and Amazon prices which includes free domestic shipping in the USA. The cable is available for shipping International on EBAY’s and the Amazon’s website. EBAY has a Global International shipping program where the EBAY dealer ships the package to EBAY’s International shipping center in Kentucky and EBAY sets the cost of International shipping based on the weight of the package and based on which country it is going to.
  8. Over a year ago I wrote a brief article on how to make a ColecoVision power supply using a ATX power supply for around $60 (or around $35 if one does not have to pay $20 for the Coleco power cord and $5 for cable supplies). Since for several years now ATX power supplies are no longer being made with the -5 volts DC feature. This means other styles of power supplies need to be used when making a ColecoVision compatible power supply. *** Warning the following enclosed switching frame power supplies have open power terminals that need some type of protective case or cover so that one does not by accident touch the 120 volt or 240 volt section of the incoming AC line and gets electrocuted. Also only experienced technicians that are skilled in making power supplies should attempt to make their own power supplies, since if one by mistake touches the high voltage section of the power supply, they could get electrocuted *** The first solution is to use the Mean Well RQ-65B power supply The top of the line Mean Well RQ-125B offers both -5 volts DC at 1amp for the ColecoVision and -12 volts DC at 0.5amps for the Commodore Amiga. However since the current price of this Mean Well RQ-125B power supply is around $40 after shipping. One may perfer a cheaper power supply at almost half the price since we are trying to keep cost low for this project. The advantage of using the Mean Well RQ-65B power supply is that it only costs $23.94 with free shipping on Amazon. Also the Mean Well RQ-65B has -5 volts DC at 0.5amps which is enough to power almost everything connected to the ColecoVision including Expansion Module #1 the Atari 2600 adapter. Also, the Mean Well RQ-65B offers -12 volts DC at 0.5amps for the Commodore Amiga computer. The Mean Well RQ-65B is an auto sensing power supply with a voltage range of 88-264 volts AC. North American consumers will need to purchase this 6 feet AC power cord with spare lugs for $3.99 plus shipping. If one does not want to spend the time and remove their existing ColecoVision power cord from the Coleco power supply. The other option is to purchase one of the new 2019 high-end ColecoVision compatible power cords from an Amazon or EBAY dealer for around $13 if purchased in QTY. So, the total price of this Mean Well power supply solution is around $40 or around $27 if you use your existing Coleco power cord that is removed from the Coleco power supply. One negative with this Mean Well power supply: Most switching power supplies on the market like the old fashion ATX power supplies have exact regulated voltages of 12 volts DC, - 5 volts DC, and 5 volts DC that are almost exactly the voltage that is on the power supply label. What I did not like about the Mean Well RQ-125B and RQ-65B is that they have an adjustment knob, since the power supplies do not put out an exact regulated voltage. For example on the Mean Well RG-65B the voltage for +5 volts DC and +12 volts DC are not a constant and require a adjustment with a screw driver. Only the -5 volts DC is regulated and stays the same on the Mean Well RG-65B and is always -4.99 Volts DC when measured with my Fluke meter. For example, adjusting the voltage for +5 volts DC has a range between 4.52-8.81 volts DC. Adjusting the voltage for 12 volts DC has a range between 11.36 to 14.56 volts DC. To make matters worse the voltage adjustment changes both the 5 volts DC and 12 volts DC at the exact same time (there is no separate adjustment). The best setting I found is to adjust the Mean Well RQ-65B rail to 5 volts DC, and then the 12 volt rail will be 12.55 volts DC. For several weeks the ColecoVision worked fine at 5 volts DC, 12.55 volts DC, and the fixed -4.99 volts DC. However, I prefer the quality of regulated ATX power supplies that put out the exact voltage with no adjustment needed. But they do not make ATX power supplies with the -5 volts DC feature anymore. My experience using the Mean Well RQ-65B for several weeks. I like the Mean Well RQ-65B since it has safety certifications like UL listed, CE certification for Europe, and other safety certifications. The power supply is exempt from the DOE level VI requirements because it is designed to be enclosed in a protective case and is not classified as an external power supply. I also like the automatic input voltage regulator for 88-264 volts AC. I connected the Mean Well RQ-65B up to my ColecoVision and when I was not using it for games, I was running 24 x 7 stress tests on the ColecoVision for several weeks. After several weeks the RQ-65B was flawless using the ColecoVision including the Expansion module #1 and Roller Controller. However, I did notice once and awhile that when connecting the Roller controller at the same time the ADAM Expansion module #3 memory console is connected, that I would see some slight screen distortion. However, the ColecoVision power supply was never designed to use the ADAM computer. And the Digital Data Drive will not work with any known ColecoVision power supplies and requires a dedicated ADAM computer power supply. If one really wants to use the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer with their ColecoVision, they might want to consider getting the higher-end Mean Well RQ-125B power supply since that power supply offers 1amp for the -5 volts DC rail which is better than the 0.5amps offered on the RQ-65B. The Mean Well RQ-125B is almost double the price at around $40 after shipping. I tested the Retro Arcade US MH-16A The Retro Arcade US MH-16A is offered on EBAY for $19.49 with free shipping. And the current (AMP) specs are comparable to the top of the line RQ-125B except for the Retro Arcade does not offer -12 volts DC which is used on computers like the Amiga. For a under $20 power supply offering 1amps on the -5 volt DC rail, 16amps on the +5 volts DC rail, and offering 4amps on the +12 volts rail is very amazing. However overall this Retro Arcade US MH-16A power supply is below the quality of the Mean Well RQ-65B. The first thing I noticed is that there is no safety certifications on the Retro Arcade US MH-16A product case or manuals at all. I understand that UL certification and UL listed is an option certification in the United States, however all modern power supplies normally have FCC certification logo and CE safety for Europe, but no evidence of this on the product itself. So, to make a long story short this product from Retro Arcade does not list any safety certifications on the product and website. Mean Well has many safety certifications which is a positive. I did have the Retro Arcade MH-16A running for over a month and it appears to be safe even though it has no safety certifications. Another negative about the Retro Arcade US MH-16A is that the voltage regulation is a lot worse when compared to the Mean Well RQ-65B. Good old fashion ATX power supplies and many other power supplies put out a perfect -5 volts DC, +12 volts DC, and + 5 volts DC without any adjustment control. The Retro Arcade US MH-16A has an adjustment knob that controls all 3 rails. If one adjusts the -5 volts DC it also adjusts the +5 volts DC and +12 volts DC. The voltage range for the 5 volt rail is between 4.16 to 5.89 volts DC. The -5 volts DC rail range is -3.54 to -5.28. The 12 volt rail range is between 9.97 to 13.95 DC. It was harder to get the Retro Arcade US MH-16A set to the correct voltage so that it would work with the ColecoVision. The best setting I found was to set the +5 volts DC rail to 5.33 volts DC, which then also puts the -5 volts rail at -4.74 volts DC and the 12 volt rail at +12.67 volts DC. The Retro Arcade US MH-16A worked flawlessly for over a month with the ColecoVision running a 24 x 7 stress tests with those voltage settings. One advantage of the Retro Arcade is that the 1 amp current on the -5 volts DC rail was plenty of power to use the roller controller and Expansion module #3 ADAM computer at the exact same time (however no known ColecoVision power supply will power the ADAM Digital Data Drives, a dedicated ADAM power supply is needed for that). The Retro Arcade US MH-16A has a manual switch when it comes to switching between 110 or 220 volts. If the switch is in the wrong position when plugging into 220 volts the power supply could be damaged. Overall the Mean Well RQ-65B for around $5 more is a much better power supply to use with the ColecoVision if one places it in a protective case. I did notice that when I used a high-end ColecoVision shielded power cord with Ferritte Bead’s that even on the cheapest power supply that the picture quality on some of my ColecoVisions was improved when using RF channel 3 output. A high-quality power cord sometimes cleans up the RF modulator noise and power supply interference issues. I really prefer using an ATX power supply or a ColecoVision USB power supply solution over these other cheaper power supplies that require manual voltage adjustments. However, the ATX power supplies with the -5 volts DC feature went out of production several years ago. I know some people complain about the price of the ColecoVision USB power supply solutions, however sometimes its better to go with higher quality power supplies then to mess around with a power supply that requires a manual voltage adjustment and a special case. In general cheaper priced products are less quality when compared to higher priced items. The ColecoVision and ADAM computer since they require a special molded plug and 3 separate voltages are always going to cost more to power. The ColecoVision/ADAM is similar to the Amiga computer and both computers can be adapted to work with ATX power supplies as long as they have the correct voltages. The following is some pictures of the Mean Well RQ-65B and Retro Arcade US MH-16A and what they look like before one uses a custom case. Personally I would rather find a out of production ATX power supply with the -5 volts DC feature and add a ColecoVision wire harness which is much better quality because of the automatic voltage regulators in the ATX power supplies.
  9. On December 23rd 2019 a new high-end Power cable was released and a QTY of 500 are available on Amazon’s and EBAY’s website Instead of creating a basic low-quality custom power cable and connector mold at half the manufacturing cost, a decision was made to make this classic 80’s style power cable with the best possible materials and manufacturing quality, so that this 21st Century custom power cable would be the best that has ever been made. According to the EBAY website if one purchases the 20 pack they can get the cable delivered at the manufacturing cost plus 0% markup. *** This high-end top of the line 21st Century power cable is much better quality when compared to the original 20th Century power cables provided by Blue Chip, Coleco, Spectravideo, and Texas Instruments. *** **** Important info: This is a power cable only; a skilled technician needs to interface the power cable to a compatible power supply or compatible transformer in order to provide power with the following Computer and videogame systems. **** 100% compatible high-end power cable for use with the following computer and videogame systems · Blue Chip Commodore compatible disk drives · ColecoVision videogame system · Spectravideo 318 and 328 computer systems · Texas Instruments TI-99 series computers (Texas Instruments model numbers TI-99/4, TI-99/4A, and TI-99/4A QI). Questions and Answers Question: What is the purpose of this power cable? Answer: This top of the line power cable is used by skilled technicians as a wire harness. With this power cable (wire harness) it allows a skilled technician to interface a compatible power supply or compatible transformer with the following classic 80’s systems: Blue Chip Commodore compatible disk drives, ColecoVision videogame system, Spectravideo 318 and 328 computer systems, and the Texas Instruments TI-99 series computers (Texas Instruments model numbers TI-99/4, TI-99/4A, and TI-99/4A QI). Question: What is the quality of this power cable when compared to the original ones used back in the 80’s? Answer: This 21st Century power cable is much better quality when compared to the original 20th Century power cables provided by Blue Chip, Coleco, Spectravideo, and Texas Instruments. This power cable was engineered in the United States and made in China using high quality materials with the help of automated machines. The original 80’s power cables were unshielded, did not use gold plating, used around 20 gauge thinner wires instead of the thicker 18 gauge wire, and did not have any Ferrite Beads. This new 21st Century power cable has a custom molded 4 pin plug with a total of 4 3u Gold-Plated pins. The other end of the power cable has a custom molded tail part with 18 gauge stripped and tinned wires. This 18-gauge power cable uses a high quality dual shielded PVC jacket. Both a single sided Aluminum Foil Shield and a Braid Shield. Also, this power cable has two Ferrite Beads to eliminate or reduce EMI/RFI interference bi-directionally from both ends of the cable (One black Ferrite Bead next to the molded 4 pin plug and one next to the molded tail part). This new 21st Century power cable is top of the line and can handle up to 300 Volts and is designed to last several decades. Power cable Specifications 100% compatible high-end power cable for use with the Blue Chip Commodore compatible disk drives, ColecoVision videogame system, Spectravideo 318 and 328 computer systems, and the Texas Instruments TI-99 series computers (Texas Instruments model numbers TI-99/4, TI-99/4A, and TI-99/4A QI). This is a power cable only; a skilled technician needs to interface the power cable to a compatible power supply or compatible transformer in order to provide power with the above Computer and videogame systems. Power cable was engineered in the United States and made in China using high quality materials with the help of automated machines. High-quality custom molded 4 pin plug is Gold Plated and is designed to last several decades (Gold Plating provides corrosion resistance). This high-quality Power cable is ROHS compliant and is made with UL approved material. Power cable length end to end is 6.56 feet (200CM). One end of Power cable has a custom molded 4 pin plug with a total of 4 3u Gold-Plated pins. The other end of the power cable has a custom molded tail part with 18 gauge stripped and tinned wires. This 18 gauge power cable uses a high quality dual shielded PVC jacket. Both a single sided Aluminum Foil Shield and a Braid Shield. Power cable has two Ferrite Beads to eliminate or reduce EMI/RFI interference bi-directionally from both ends of the cable (One black Ferrite Bead next to the molded 4 pin plug and one next to the molded tail part). Wire Specifications Conductor: UL2464 18 gauge x 4 tinned copper wires + 1 black color wire that is the shield. Strands 16/0 .254+/-0.008mm. 20 degrees C, resistance maximum 23.2 ohm/KM. Insulation: PVC insulation thickness NOM: 0.38mm, MIN: 0.28mm, Rated 80 degrees C, 300 Volts, Insulation Over Diameter: 1.98 +/- 0.10mm, Color: Yellow, Red, Blue, White, and Black for the shield. Dual Shielding specs: This 18 gauge power cable uses a high quality dual shielded PVC jacket. Both a single sided Aluminum Foil Shield and a Braid Shield (16/6/0. 10TS+/-0.008mm). Jacket: PVC Jacket, Average Jacket Thickness: Nom: 0.76mm, MIN: 0.60mm, Rated: 80 degrees C, 300 Volts, Cable Over Diameter: 7.00 +/-0.30mm, Color Black. Markings: E332295, AWN STYLE 2464 18AWG, 80 degrees C, 300V, VW-1 PVC, FT1 -LF-.
  10. Back in the 80’s there was over 2 million ColecoVision’s sold, over 3 million Texas Instruments TI-99 series computers sold, and an estimated 100,000+ Spectravideo systems sold. Plus, maybe 50,000+ Blue Chip Commodore disk drives sold. That is an estimated 5.2 million systems made. However, over the many decades out of the 5.2 million systems made, only around 1% of those systems are still being used. So, an estimated 52,000 people out of the 5.2 million systems made are still using those systems in theory. So, if 52,000 people are still using those systems, then there will come a time when they will need a replacement power supply that requires a special 4 pin power connector. Some company should have came out with a custom 4 pin power connector 20 years ago when the demand was a little stronger. I guess they say better late then never. Perhaps no one wanted to take the business risk of making a new expensive custom 4 pin power plug and cable mold for classic 80's systems that are not being made anymore. One never knows what the real world demand is for a product until the product is released into the real world. Some consumer electronic products are very popular when released, other products are not successful at all and end up being products that lose a lot of money.
  11. The ColecoVision/ADAM used +12 volts DC, -5 volts DC, and +5 Volts DC and never used -12 volts DC like someone mentioned. -12 volts DC was something needed on the Amiga computer. Also when comparing the Donkey Kong, Donkey Kong Junior on the ADAM, the ADAM was better then the ATARI computers and Commodore 64/128 versions offered in the 20th Century. One of the reasons why the ColecoVison/ADAM is still popular today is because of its classic 80's quality graphics and sound quality. It was not just Coleco that had their production problems back in early 1983 with the ADAM, that were fixed in 1984. Commodore had there own production problems with the Amiga computer in 1985 that were not fixed until 1986. The Amiga 1000 with 7.16Mhz 68000 Motorola CPU was more powerful then the ADAM and was Commodore's first computer with detachable keyboard and a separate memory console like the ADAM. quote " The Amiga 1000 was released in July 1985, but a series of production problems kept it from becoming widely available until early 1986. The best selling model, the Amiga 500, was introduced in 1987 and became one of the leading home computers of the late 1980s and early 1990s with four to six million sold." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amiga
  12. In the 20th Century the best home version of Donkey Kong, Donkey Kong Junior (5 screen), and Buck Rodgers was on the ADAM computer. I remember playing Buck Rodgers the Supergame on Digital Data Pack back in 1983 and was amazed of how awesome the quality was compared to any other system. Some of those first ADAM games used almost the entire 256K of space like Richard Scary's Best Electronic Workbook Ever. The ADAM was ahead of its time. The Amiga and NES in late 1985 were better if a programmer would have made the exact same games. The problems with comparing 20th Century videogame and computer systems is that one always needs to compare the same game titles to get a real world performance measurement. Many computer and videogame systems have their plusses and minuses when it comes to specs. I love the detachable ADAMNET keyboard with the ADAM. So many companies like Commodore had the memory console built into the keyboard, unlike the ADAM that placed the memory console in a separate box just like modern 21st century desktop computers. The ADAM had 4 expansion module slots (3 internal and 1 external) plus up to 16 devices could be connected to ADAMNet like a disk drive, and keyboard. The Coleco ADAM was a real computer with a lot of expansion modules and options. That is why the computer system had some dedicated third party support for around a 10 year period, which is good for a system that only sold around 500,000+ ADAM computers.
  13. The ColecoVision between August 1982 to October 1985 remained the most powerful videogame system on the market. The ADAM computer system was the most powerful color home computer system with videogames that were better than the ColecoVision because of the built in Supergame module. So, the ADAM was King of color computers between October 1983 to July 1985. Since Coleco stopped production on both the ColecoVision and ADAM in January 1985, and left the home computer and videogame business, this met one would never see a 16 bit ColecoVision/ADAM replacement. On July 23rd 1985 the Amiga computer by Commodore was released. The Amiga was more powerful then the ADAM computer, however I decided to continue to use my ADAM computer until the early 90’s as my only computer system since I liked the classic Supergames like Donkey Kong and Donkey Kong Junior (Ended up using Windows around 1993 with a IBM compatible computer). On October 18th 1985 the Nintendo videogame system was released in the United States. This Nintendo videogame system was more powerful when compared to the ColecoVision and ADAM when it came to graphics quality. Therefore, the ColecoVision system and ADAM were King of the videogame world in terms of best quality until late 1985. If Coleco would have kept going they might have released a 16bit ColecoVision/ADAM type system. Maybe call it Eve the ADAM compatible computer system.
  14. What is the planned release date for the SGM2 and when does pre-ordering start?
  15. Yes working with the ADAM and ColecoVision is a must have feature for ADAM owners. The original SGM worked with both.
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