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  1. The main issue currently is that the Col USB plug is out of production and out of stock from Germany Dragonbox website. No one anywhere in the world can purchase the Col USB if the Dragonbox website is out of stock. Now if they were to ramp up production again and get them in stock again, then it would be an issue of which USA dealers plan on stocking the product. When Dragonbox use to manufactory and stock the Col USB plug, there was some issues that some dealers had when trying to purchase in large quantity. Therefore, some people stopped purchasing the Col USB plug from Germany because of some issues they had after they placed the order. I choose not to go into details. It’s a non-issue now since the Col USB plug is out of production and might never go back into production.
  2. The main issue currently is that the Col USB plug is out of production and out of stock from Germany Dragonbox website. No one anywhere in the world can purchase the Col USB if the Dragonbox website is out of stock. Now if they were to ramp up production again and get them in stock again, then it would be a issue of which USA dealers plan on stocking the product. The item has to be both in production and in stock then people can complain about the prodcuts price or the shipping cost to dealers to import several Col USB plugs to the USA. The Mean Well 28.5 Watt ColecoVision power supply solution is better and cheaper in price. However the worldwide ColecoVision community only has one third party power supply option to choose from now, when it comes to ColecoVision power supplies instead of two options.
  3. The Dragonbox Col USB Power plug for the ColecoVision has went out of production according to my sources and is no longer being stocked by dealers. However, the Dragonbox website in Germany says the Col USB is “out of stock” so maybe under ideal conditions the company might manufacture some more CV-power (Col USB) plugs. But that most likely is wishful thinking. Every authorized Col USB dealer in the United States is out of stock (including all worldwide dealers). Once and awhile the Col USB plug might pop up on EBAY or Amazon from various dealers at inflated prices for new and used units. ColUSB - USB Power Supply for the Colecovision - Power Supplies (dragonbox.de) NO LONGER STOCKED ColUSB - USB Power Supply for the Colecovision ColecoPlug USB-C (console5.com) ColUSB - USB Power Supply / Adapter for the Colecovision - Stone Age Gamer
  4. The Dragonbox Col USB Power plug for the ColecoVision has went out of production according to my sources and is no longer being stocked by dealers. However, the Dragonbox website in Germany says the Col USB is “out of stock” so maybe under ideal conditions the company might manufacture some more CV-power (Col USB) plugs. But that most likely is wishful thinking. Every authorized Col USB dealer in the United States is out of stock (including all worldwide dealers). Once and awhile the Col USB plug might pop up on EBAY or Amazon from various dealers at inflated prices for new and used units. ColUSB - USB Power Supply for the Colecovision - Power Supplies (dragonbox.de) NO LONGER STOCKED ColUSB - USB Power Supply for the Colecovision ColecoPlug USB-C (console5.com) ColUSB - USB Power Supply / Adapter for the Colecovision - Stone Age Gamer
  5. While currently all AC to AC consumer power supplies are all unregulated, in the 80’s there were also some videogame systems like the Atari 5200 that used unregulated AC to DC adapters instead of regulated DC adapters. The ColecoVision had a high-quality regulated DC to DC power supply. Regulated power supplies are always better then unregulated power supplies, however some computer and videogame systems from the 70’s and 80’s require AC to AC power supplies which only come in unregulated power supply designs. My goal when selecting a third-party power supply for a system is to be as close as possible to the original voltage output when under a load. 100% of all Mattel computer adapters shipped with an unregulated AC to AC power supply, therefore the TRIAD WAU090-1200 AC to AC power supply is an ideal match and is as close as possible to what Mattel used back in the 80’s for the computer adapter. However, I have not been physically taking these classic 70’s and 80’s systems apart and checking to see if there is a bridge rectifier with voltage regulator that handles both AC and DC power supplies. One of the reasons why some videogame systems and computer systems used unregulated AC and unregulated DC power supplies was because they were cheaper in price when compared to regulated DC power supplies. That price advantage no longer exists with unregulated AC to AC power supplies, and regulated DC power supplies have around 99.5% of the market in the 21st Century at a cheaper price. Thanks for sharing that you have used a DC power supply on the Mattel computer adapter for over a year. I have not tried a DC adapter, but if you have had no problems for over a year, then Mattel must have made the computer adapter with the ability to accept both AC and DC power supplies as long as the voltage is around 10 volts while under a load.
  6. There are some products on the market that require low voltage AC input since the internal bridge rectifier and voltage regulator can be destroyed with native DC adapters. The original Intellivision Computer adapter, Intellivision II, Odyssey 2 and NES power supply uses low voltage AC to AC transformers. However, I have heard that some consumer products like the NES can accept both AC and DC inputs, but the problem is some products on the market if one inputs native DC voltage, the product will be destroyed completely since it does not have the proper bridge rectifier and voltage regulator to handle the DC input. Some consumer videogames and computer systems can only use AC input and when DC is used it shortens the life of the product. The TI-99/4A and Spectravideo 318/328 are two computer systems that require AC voltage only and will not work with DC voltage unless one internally modifies the power supply, etc . Now internally the TI-99/4a and Spectravideo 318/328 system will convert AC to DC, but it is my understanding that those systems will be destroyed if one tries to input DC directly. So, one needs to be very careful not to place an AC to DC adapter on a product that requires AC only. Also one needs to be careful not to place a AC to AC adapter on a product that requires DC only. It is rare to find a consumer product that was designed to work with both low voltage AC and low voltage DC. Back in the 70’s and 80’s some videogame systems and computer systems decided to use low voltage unregulated AC transformers since they use to cost less when compared to regulated DC power supplies.
  7. The other day while searching online I saw a couple of generic brand AC to AC external power supplies that claimed to be level VI complaint according to the specs. However, upon further investigation the detailed specs sheet only mentioned that the power supplies have passed level V efficiency tests, I even emailed the company and they could not provide any information on rather they sold any AC to AC power supplies with level VI feature. The TRIAD Magnetics company as far as I am aware is the only company that makes AC to AC external power supplies that are level VI certified per the DOE rules put in place back in Feb 10th 2016. Also TRAID AC to AC power supplies are UL listed. While UL listed is a optional certification in the United States, many brands of AC to AC power supplies do not get the UL listed certification because of the $15,000 fee, and sometimes have fake UL listed symbols on the power supply. If anyone is interested in measuring their computer system or videogame system under a load with a digital multimeter. Measuring a computer or videogame system motherboard voltage load can be done without needing to take the system apart as long as one has the proper cables and adapter plugs. The following 2 Pack DC Power 1 Female to 2 Male Splitter adapter for $6.99 from Amazon works good for measuring no load and load voltages with a digital multi-meter on one end of the cable. Also this high-quality Chinese made 34 piece AC and DC adapter plug kit from EBAY for $12.88 with free shipping works great when one needs a different size plug to connect videogame and computer systems in order to measure the voltage under a load. This high-end TRIAD WAU090-1200 power supply is 100% compatible with the following systems 100% compatible with the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module). 100% compatible with the original NES-101 front loading model that was released in 1985. 100% compatible with the original NES-101 top loading model that was released in 1993. 100% compatible with the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system (a optional power adapter plug is needed to support Odyssey 2 systems that need the special 3.5mm plug). ** Not compatible with the Super Nintendo Entertainment System **
  8. The other day while searching online I saw a couple of generic brand AC to AC external power supplies that claimed to be level VI complaint according to the specs. However, upon further investigation the detailed specs sheet only mentioned that the power supplies have passed level V efficiency tests, I even emailed the company and they could not provide any information on rather they sold any AC to AC power supplies with level VI feature. The TRIAD Magnetics company as far as I am aware is the only company that makes AC to AC external power supplies that are level VI certified per the DOE rules put in place back in Feb 10th 2016. Also TRAID AC to AC power supplies are UL listed. While UL listed is a optional certification in the United States, many brands of AC to AC power supplies do not get the UL listed certification because of the $15,000 fee, and sometimes have fake UL listed symbols on the power supply. If anyone is interested in measuring their computer system or videogame system under a load with a digital multimeter. Measuring a computer or videogame system motherboard voltage load can be done without needing to take the system apart as long as one has the proper cables and adapter plugs. The following 2 Pack DC Power 1 Female to 2 Male Splitter adapter for $6.99 from Amazon works good for measuring no load and load voltages with a digital multi-meter on one end of the cable. Also this high-quality Chinese made 34 piece AC and DC adapter plug kit from EBAY for $12.88 with free shipping works great when one needs a different size plug to connect videogame and computer systems in order to measure the voltage under a load. This high-end TRIAD WAU090-1200 power supply is 100% compatible with the following systems 100% compatible with the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module). 100% compatible with the original NES-101 front loading model that was released in 1985. 100% compatible with the original NES-101 top loading model that was released in 1993. 100% compatible with the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system (a optional power adapter plug is needed to support Odyssey 2 systems that need the special 3.5mm plug). ** Not compatible with the Super Nintendo Entertainment System **
  9. The other day while searching online I saw a couple of generic brand AC to AC external power supplies that claimed to be level VI complaint according to the specs. However, upon further investigation the detailed specs sheet only mentioned that the power supplies have passed level V efficiency tests, I even emailed the company and they could not provide any information on rather they sold any AC to AC power supplies with level VI feature. The TRIAD Magnetics company as far as I am aware is the only company that makes AC to AC external power supplies that are level VI certified per the DOE rules put in place back in Feb 10th 2016. Also TRAID AC to AC power supplies are UL listed. While UL listed is a optional certification in the United States, many brands of AC to AC power supplies do not get the UL listed certification because of the $15,000 fee, and sometimes have fake UL listed symbols on the power supply. If anyone is interested in measuring their computer system or videogame system under a load with a digital multimeter. Measuring a computer or videogame system motherboard voltage load can be done without needing to take the system apart as long as one has the proper cables and adapter plugs. The following 2 Pack DC Power 1 Female to 2 Male Splitter adapter for $6.99 from Amazon works good for measuring no load and load voltages with a digital multi-meter on one end of the cable. Also this high-quality Chinese made 34 piece AC and DC adapter plug kit from EBAY for $12.88 with free shipping works great when one needs a different size plug to connect videogame and computer systems in order to measure the voltage under a load. This high-end TRIAD WAU090-1200 power supply is 100% compatible with the following systems 100% compatible with the Mattel Intellivision Computer Adapter (computer module). 100% compatible with the original NES-101 front loading model that was released in 1985. 100% compatible with the original NES-101 top loading model that was released in 1993. 100% compatible with the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system (a optional power adapter plug is needed to support Odyssey 2 systems that need the special 3.5mm plug). ** Not compatible with the Super Nintendo Entertainment System **
  10. If one needs a replacement power supply for their Magnavox Odyssey 2 system, then the best 100% compatible power supply to get is the TRIAD WAU090-1200 that was engineered in the USA and made in China using high quality materials. The original Odyssey 2 AC 9084-BK02 power supply had a cord that is around 10 feet 7 inches long. This TRIAD WAU090-1200 Odyssey 2 compatible power supply has a cord that is 6 feet long according to the spec sheet (However my actual TRIAD had a real world length of 6 feet 7 inches). As of February 10th 2016, all external power supplies manufactured for use in the United States and imported into the United States is required to have the energy efficiency level VI rating per the Department of Energy law. Dealers in the United State that have old stock of power supplies, are allowed under the law to sale their old stock of power supplies as long as those power supplies were manufactured and imported into the United States before Feb 10th 2016. In 2020 many AC to DC power supplies one purchases online are level VI complaint. However AC to AC power supplies are not in demand, since most modern consumer products in the 21st Century use AC to DC power supplies, therefore there are some USA dealers that still have old stock of AC to AC power supplies that they imported into the United States before February 10th 2016, that they are trying to get rid of at clearance prices. However, there are also many third-party companies producing both AC to AC and AC to DC external power supplies that are made in China, and violating the Department of Energy level VI compliant rules put in place back in February 10th 2016. *** I have done a massive amount of research and as far as I aware the TRIAD Magnetics company is the only company that makes AC to AC external power supplies that have the required energy efficiency level VI defined by the DOE Docket Number EERE-2008-BT-STD-0005-0219. *** TRIAD engineers the power supplies in the United States and has the power supplies made in China using very high quality parts and material. While external AC to DC power supplies that are level VI complaint started appearing on the USA market in late 2015 or early 2016, the first TRIAD AC to AC level VI complaint power supplies started appearing on the USA market around January 24th 2017. Here is the detailed spec sheet for the TRIAD WAU090-1200 that is ideal for use with the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system. The cheapest price for the TRIAD WAU090-1200 is around $20-$25 when purchased online. This is a heavy transformer based power supply since light weight switching based consumer AC to AC power supplies have not been invented yet and might never be invented because of lack of demand for AC to AC power supplies. At the time of this post Newark sells the TRIAD WAU090-1200 for $19.63 each plus free shipping on orders over $150. Another dealer called Mouser Electronics has the TRIAD WAU090-1200 for $16.36 + $7.99 for shipping (total price around $24.35). *** Important info, some Odyssey 2 systems need a 3.5mm power plug *** When Magnavox designed the Odyssey 2 system, there were two different variations of power jacks that were used on the systems. Most Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems use the 2.1mm x 5.5mm size connector that is a perfect fit when used with the TRIAD WAU090-1200 adapter. However, if one owns one of the Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems that require a 3.5mm size power connector, then this 5.5 x 2.1mm female to 3.5mm male adapter plug can be purchased on EBAY for a QTY of 2 for only $1.49 plus free shipping. I tested this power adapter plug and it works fine on the Odyssey 2 systems that need a 3.5mm plug. *** This is a top of the line power supply for the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system. This power supply has excellent build quality. *** This high-end third party power supply is a direct replacement for the original Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supply · 100% compatible with the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system (works with both the first generation and second generation Magnavox Odyssey 2). The Magnavox Odyssey 2 system has hardware variations and uses two different sizes of power jacks, and this high-end third party power supply is 100% compatible with all North America Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems since it supports both sizes of power jacks with the purchase of a optional adapter plug. This is a 100% compatible power supply for the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system. This is a high-end replacement power supply for the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system. · This power supply is a high-quality consumer AC power supply that is designed for North America and has an input voltage of 120 volts AC at 60Hz. Rated output voltage is 9 volts AC at 1.2 amps. Since all consumer AC to AC power supplies on the market use unregulated voltage designs, there is a load curve from zero to full load. When this power supply is connected to the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system, it will output the proper voltage just like the original Odyssey 2 power supply. More information about this can be found in the Questions and Answers section. Power supply has UL listed safety certification for the United States market and CUL safety certification for the Canadian markets (UL safety certificate number E341931). Efficiency Level VI certified by the Department of Energy (DOE): Consuming up to 25% less power than previous 60 Hertz AC power supplies, this line of AC power supplies was among the first to meet the U.S. Department of Energy’s Level VI efficiency standard. This is slightly larger than similar products of lesser efficiency, as higher-grade core materials are needed to meet the Level VI requirements. RoHS Complaint power supply Engineered in the United States and made in China using high quality materials. Output cord is 6 feet long. 10 year warranty offered directly by the manufacture of the power supply. Questions and Answers Question: What Magnavox Odyssey 2 products is this power supply compatible with? Answer: This third-party power supply is a direct replacement for the original Odyssey 2 power supply. This high-end third party power supply is 100% compatible with both the first generation and second generation Magnavox Odyssey 2 system. The Magnavox Odyssey 2 system has hardware variations and uses two different sizes of power jacks, and this high-end third party power supply is 100% compatible with all North America Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems since it supports both sizes of power jacks (an optional power adapter plug needs to be purchased to support Odyssey 2 systems that need the special adapter plug). This third party power supply is also 100% compatible with the Voice speech and sound effects module that was made for the North America Magnavox Odyssey 2 system. Question: How does the quality of this third-party AC to AC power supply compare to my original Odyssey 2 system power supply? Answer: This power supply is slightly better quality when compared to the original Odyssey 2 power supply. There have been major improvements in the design of AC to DC power supplies over the last 40+ years, however in the last 40+ years there has only been minor improvements when it comes to AC to AC power supplies. In fact, finding an AC to AC power supply on the market is rare since many companies have decided to only make DC power supplies. This AC to AC power supply is UL listed which is a safety certification for the USA market. In addition, this power supply has the Canadian CUL safety certification. This power supply has the required Energy Efficiency Level VI certification by the Department of Energy (DOE). This power supply is RoHS complaint too. Currently this is the only level VI approved AC power supply on the North America market that will work with the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system. Question: One of my original Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supplies that was made in Taiwan has a model number of AC 9084-BK02 and the label says it outputs 12 volts AC at 0.83 amps (plus it offers two different sizes of power plugs at the end of the y cable). Then a second style of Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supply that I own has a model number of AJ9046 and the label says it outputs 11 volts AC at 0.9 amps (but only contains one style of power plug at the end of the cable instead of two). Then a third Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supply I own that was assembled in Mexico has a model number of AC 9063-BKOS and the label says it outputs 11.5 volts AC at 0.4 amps (but only contains one style of power plug at the end of the cable instead of two). Does this third party power supply support all hardware variations and power plug sizes for the North America Magnavox Odyssey 2 system? Answer: You mentioned 3 different official models of the Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supply that were made by Magnavox, but in fact there are many more models of official power supplies made for the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system. 100% of all Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems designed for North America all have the exact same voltage and current draw requirements, however there is some small differences in the voltage level outputs and current capacity of the original Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supplies that were made. One of the reasons why there is so many different styles of original Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supplies on the market is because Magnavox for some unknown reason made the decision to use two different styles of power jacks on the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system (In the ideal world Magnavox should have made all the Odyssey 2 systems with the same size power jack). Some Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems have a 3.5mm female power jack on the back of the console that requires a power supply with a 3.5mm male end at the end of the cable. While other Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems have a 2.1mm x 5.5mm female power jack on the back of the console that requires a power supply with a 2.1mm x 5.5mm male end at the end of the cable. Many of the variations in the Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supply is because some models use one size of power plug at the end of the cable while others use another size of power plug at the end of the cable. These two different sizes of power jacks on the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system has caused confusion when consumers needed to replace a power supply for their system. The latest and best original power supply for the Magnavox Odyssey 2 is model number: AC 9084-BK02 that was made in Taiwan and has a label that says it outputs 12 volts AC at 0.83 amps. The original AC 9084-BK02 power supply offers more than double the current capacity when compared to the AC 9063-BKOS, in addition the main advantage of the AC 9084-BK02 is that it has two different sizes of power plugs at the end of the y cable so that it supports 100% of all Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems in North America. This high-end third party power supply is also 100% compatible with all North America Odyssey 2 systems since one can purchase a optional power adapter plug that converts the default 2.1mm x 5.5mm male size plug to a 3.5mm male size plug. It should be mentioned that most Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems do not need this adapter plug with a 3.5mm male end since most Odyssey 2 systems require the default 2.1mm x 5.5mm male connector size at the end of the cable. However the optional power adapter plug offers 100% compatibility with all Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems. Question: I have seen level VI energy efficient AC to AC power supplies on the market that have a label on it that says it outputs 12 volts AC at 1 amp, which would appear to be almost an exact match when compared to the original Magnavox Odyssey 2 AC 9084-BK02 power supply that also has a label on it that says it outputs 12 volts AC. Why does this third party AC to AC power supply for the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system have a label on it that says it outputs only 9 volts AC at 1.2 amps? Answer: Unregulated AC to AC power supplies are much more complicated when compared to regulated AC to DC power supplies that most people normally use. All consumer AC to AC power supplies on the market have unregulated designs, which means there is a load curve from zero load to full load. For example, the original Magnavox Odyssey 2 AJ9046 power supply label on it says 11 volts AC at 0.9 amps, and under real world conditions has a no-load voltage of around 12.65 volts AC. When the Magnavox Odyssey 2 AJ9046 power supply is under a load from the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system, it is outputting around 11.57 volts AC and around 10.76 volts AC when the voice synthesis module is connected. The newest and best official Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supply is the AC 9084-BK02. For example, the original Magnavox Odyssey 2 AC 9084-BK02 power supply label on it says 12 volts AC at 0.83 amps, and under real world conditions has a no-load voltage of around 11.78 volts AC. When the Magnavox Odyssey 2 AC 9084-BK02 power supply is under a load from the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system, it is outputting around 10.99 volts AC and around 10.26 volts AC when the voice synthesis module is connected. Therefore, there is around a 0.5 (1/2 volt) difference when one compares the official Magnavox Odyssey 2 AJ9046 power supply to the official Magnavox Odyssey 2 AC 9084-BK02 power supply. The reason I decided not to use a third party 12 volt AC 1 amp power supply on the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system is because the 9 volt AC 1.2 amp model is a much better match. For example, a top of the line third party 12 volt AC 1 amp power supply according to the spec sheet has a voltage rating of 15 volts AC when there is no load (zero current draw). Under real world conditions I measured around 14.92 volts AC when there is no load. However as soon as the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system is drawing a load, the third party 12 volt AC power supply model outputs around 13.64 volts AC and around 12.58 volts AC when the voice synthesis module is connected. Therefore, the reason I do not recommend a third party 12 volt AC 1 amp power supply is because when under a load the voltage is between 2.32 to 2.65 volts higher when compared to the original Magnavox Odyssey 2 AC 9084-BK02 power supply. The following test results from a top of the line third party 9 volt AC 1.2 amp power supply is much closer to the original Magnavox Odyssey 2 AC 9084-BK02 power supply. This high-end top of the line 9 volt AC 1.2 amp power supply according to the spec sheet has a voltage rating of 11.6 volts AC when there is no load (zero current draw). Under real world conditions I measured around 11.09 volts AC when there is no load. However as soon as the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system is drawing a load, this third party 9 volt AC power supply outputs 10.38 volts AC and around 9.68 volts AC when the voice synthesis module is connected. Therefore, this third party 9 volt AC power supply when under a load has only between a 0.58 to 0.61 voltage difference when compared to the official Magnavox Odyssey 2 AC 9084-BK02 power supply. Even the different models of the original Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supplies have around a 0.5 volt (1/2 volt) difference when compared to each other. So overall because of the load curve data, this 9 volt AC 1.2 amp third party power supply is a ideal match for ones Magnavox Odyssey 2 system. For around a month I did 24 x 7 stress testing on two separate Magnavox Odyssey 2 systems with the voice module connected while using this 9 volt AC 1.2 amp third party power supply. This power supply is a perfect replacement for the Magnavox Odyssey 2. Question: Why is the physical size of this third-party Magnavox Odyssey 2 power supply larger when compared to the smaller original power supplies that were offered by Magnavox? Answer: The original around 40 year old AC to AC power supplies can be made smaller since there was no energy efficiency laws for external power supplies back in the 20th Century. This modern third party AC to AC external power supply is level VI compliant. As of February 10th 2016, per the Department of Energy regulations, all external power supplies manufactured for the USA consumer market and imported into the United States are required by law to be certified by the DOE to level VI energy efficiency standards. Therefore, to be in compliance with this DOE mandate, level VI power supplies are slightly larger than similar products of lesser efficiency, as higher-grade core materials are needed to meet the Level VI requirements. This modern level VI power supply also consumes up to 25% less power than previous 60 Hertz AC power supplies Question: Can I use this power supply with other products that I own that need 9 volts AC and what would happen if the current draw on the device I connect to this power supply starts to draw more than 1.2 amps? Answer: Because of the load curve on all consumer unregulated AC power supplies, one needs to be careful with the products they use this power supply with. The load curve for this power supply under real word conditions is between 11.09 volts to 9 volts AC. This power supply will only output around 9 volts AC when the load is 1.2 amps. However, one should never use this power supply with a product that requires more than 1.2 amps, since the voltage would drop below 9 volts AC and destroy the power supply. Unregulated AC power supplies have a small safety margin where the fuse in the power supply will not open if there is a brief current draw that goes over the 1.2 amps for only a few seconds. AC to AC transformers are not designed for the user to exceed the output current. Given an overload condition, they will start to heat-up and internal built-in safety mechanisms (fuse) will open, permanently destroying the power supply. These power supplies are sealed at the factory and were not designed to be opened up for a user to replace the fuse, also the 10-year manufactory warranty would most likely not be honored if the consumer abused the power supply and went over the stated current of 1.2 amps. Question: Why is this power supply only offered in North America, what if I wanted to use this power supply on 220 volts at 50Hz? Answer: This power supply would be permanently destroyed and the internal fuse would blow if connected to 220 volts at 50Hz. All consumer AC to AC power supplies are made for either 120 volts AC at 60Hz or 220 volts AC at 50Hz. In the 21st Century major technological advances have been made on worldwide regulated AC to DC power supplies that work between 100-240 volts AC at 50-60Hz. However, because of that lack of consumer demand for unregulated AC to AC power supplies being used in the 21st Century, the research and development costs have not been spent to make AC to AC power supplies work worldwide between 100-240 volt AC at 50-60Hz. Therefore, all consumer AC to AC power supplies for the North America market are still designed to only work with 120 volts AC at 60Hz. There are power supply companies in Europe that do make AC to AC power supplies that work at only 220 volts at 50Hz, and one might be able to locate one that works with the Magnavox Odyssey 2 system.
  11. One negative feature with the Odyssey 2 is that all or most game cartridges have a “select game” screen that always is on the screen until one makes a selection. Therefore, if someone were to turn on the Odyssey 2 and leave the cartridge “select game” screen on the screen for 2 hours or more on a CRT or other type of screen that has burn in issues, one could damage the display with the “select game” words burned on the screen. Magnavox should have made the “select game” screen to disappear after a few minutes or go through some other type of screen saver mode where the image shifts or fades. As long as one makes a selection at the “select game” menu, then after that the screen saver mode will work for all the game cartridges, however one does not want to get busy with a phone call or other activity for several hours and leave that “select game” screen up or they could risk burn in issues on certain displays. The ColecoVision/ADAM, Atari 2600 and almost all other systems have some type of burn in protection for displays by using screen saver techniques for all games.
  12. Another advantage of the ColecoVision system, is that if one turns the videogame console on without a cartridge, they get a nice ColecoVision logo screen that says “ColecoVision: Turn Game Off Before Inserting Cartridge or Expansion Module”. For some reason almost all 70’s and 80’s videogame systems including the Odyssey 2 require a cartridge to be inserted to get a image on the screen.
  13. My very first brand new videogame system, was the ColecoVision back around August of 1982. Then in October of 1983 I purchased the expansion module #3 ADAM computer that turned my ColecoVision into not only a high-end computer but a more advanced videogame system that played Supergames. Every videogame and computer system has its plusses and minuses. The ColecoVision/ADAM ended up going out of production in January of 1985. It was not until October 1985 in North America that a more powerful videogame system called the Nintendo Entertainment System was able to beat graphics and sound performance of the out of production ColecoVision/ADAM. Back in February of 1979 the Magnavox Odyssey 2 was released in North America. The Odyssey 2 was both a videogame system and a computer. The Odyssey 2 had a Computer Intro cartridge that allowed one to write programs on the computer and run those programs, however many people do not consider the Odyssey 2 to be a computer since there is no input and output jacks to store and retrieve homemade programs like what is found on the ATARI 400 and 800 computers that were released later that year in November of 1979. There were 4 million ATARI computers sold, 2 million ColecoVision’s, 500,000 Coleco ADAM’s, and the Odyssey 2 was popular enough to sell 2 million systems. I purchased a used 1979 Odyssey 2 videogame/computer system for the first time just fairly recently in October of 2020. My first encounter with the Odyssey 2 was in a retail store back in 1979, it had a fancy keyboard when compared to 1979 keyboards, however almost every retail store I visited where I lived, the Odyssey 2 system was not on display and also not hooked up to a TV. I remember back in or around 1980 that the ATARI 2600 and Intellivision were the two main videogame systems that were hooked up to TV’s in retail stores and getting most of the attention. The 1977 Atari 2600 had better graphics then the Odyssey 2 (2 million Odyssey 2 systems sold) and the Atari 2600 sold around 30 million videogame consoles. The 1979 Intellivision which was more powerful then both the Odyssey 2 and Atari 2600 sold over 3 million videogame consoles. While most people are disappointed in the videogame graphics quality of the Odyssey 2, it does have some videogames that are better than the May 1982 Arcadia 2001 videogame system. While some of the videogames are lacking in detail when it comes to graphics quality on the Odyssey 2, the two big advantages of the Odyssey 2 over most videogame systems including the ATARI 2600 and Arcadia 2001, is that the Odyssey 2 has a computer keyboard and a voice add on module (However the computer keyboard on the Odyssey 2 is not as good of quality as the state of the art Coleco ADAM keyboard, and also the Odyssey 2 has no expansion interface so the cartridge slot is used to attach hardware upgrades like the Odyssey 2 voice module). One big advantage of the Intellivision Voice Synthesis module is that the voices generated from the Intellivoice are all mixed in with the main audio coming out of the TV speaker. The big negative of the Odyssey 2 is that most likely because of some technical issues, the audio from the Odyssey 2 voice module is not automatically mixed in with the audio that is generated from the main videogame console. Therefore 100% of the time when using a special game cartridge that is voice enhanced one has to manually adjust the volume on the voice module so that the dedicated speaker on the voice module is at the correct level. Therefore, every time one adjusts the voice on the TV speaker they also need to turn up or down the voice that is generated from the built-in speaker from the voice module. It is too bad that the Odyssey 2 system was not able to make a voice module that internally mixed the audio just like the Intellivoice was able to do for the Intellivision videogame system. While most the programs that are voice enhanced for the Odyssey 2 sound like a computer generated voice, there are some game cartridges like K.C.’s Krazy Chase that has a excellent natural human voice quality that is really amazing for that period of time. The Odyssey 2 voice module was known as a major enhancement that people with an ATARI 2600 and many other videogame systems at that period of time could not hear voices. The Odyssey 2 videogame system started off correctly by offering on its first generation Odyssey 2 consoles DB9 detachable hand controllers that were painted silver. These were 8 direction joysticks with a fire button. So far I have never seen a defective Odyssey 2 joystick (even though they most likely exist). I have purchased many used videogame consoles and controllers like the ColecoVision, Intellivision, and others, which usually have controllers that wear out and are not as reliable as some systems. There is something special about the Odyssey 2 controllers, they seem to have a very good build quality and the several that I have used that are around 40 years old work perfectly fine with no flaws at all. However, what is really disappointing is that the second generation hand controllers (painted black) that shipped with the second generation of the Odyssey 2, are hardwired to the Odyssey 2 motherboard which makes it very difficult to replace the controller if the controller or cable becomes damaged. The Odyssey 2 hardware engineers should have stayed with the first generation detachable DB9 style of controllers (one has to detach or connect the DB9 controllers when the system is off, since while the system was on a lock up would occur when messing with the two DB9 ports). Another negative is that the Odyssey 2 first generation systems that do have the silver controllers with DB9 ports, use a proprietary wiring method so that only Odyssey 2 controllers work on an Odyssey 2 videogame system. The Odyssey 2 system would have been a more popular system if all the Odyssey 2 consoles had DB9 jacks that were 100% compatible with the ATARI 2600 controllers. However maybe Atari would not have liked Magnavox making the Odyssey 2 to be compatible with standard Atari joysticks. There were a massive amount of third party Atari 2600 controllers being made, it is disappointing that the Odyssey 2 was not designed to be compatible with standard Atari 2600 controllers. Then they made the Odyssey 2 system worse by getting rid of the DB9 controller ports and making all second generation Odyssey 2 systems controllers hardwired to the motherboard. Another bad decision by the Odyssey 2 engineers was to make some of the consoles using a 2.1mm power plug and other consoles using a 3.5mm power plug. All other brands of videogame and computer systems that I know of always used the same exact style of power plug if it was the same exact model number, and would never change plug size for the same exact model number of videogame or computer system. For some reason some Odyssey 2 videogame systems ship with a 3.5mm power plug and others ship with a 2.1mm size power plug. The AC voltage and current draw was exactly the same and the only difference was the power plug size. However, when consumers lost their power supply or needed a replacement for some reason, the consumer had to determine if they need to purchase the 3.5mm version of the power supply or the 2.1mm version of the power supply. The latest versions of the Odyssey 2 videogame system power supply has both a 2.1mm and 3.5mm plug at the end of the power cord so that only one power supply needed to be made instead of two separate power supplies. My point is that in the ideal world all Odyssey 2 systems should have been made with the exact same power plug size. The first generation of Odyssey 2 consoles uses a custom size RF plug that only works with the special first generation of Odyssey 2 TV game switches. One positive feature of the second generation Odyssey 2 systems, is that they used a standard male RCA plug at the end of the RF cable that almost all other systems in the 70’s and 80’s used. The advantage of systems like the Intellivision and ColecoVision is that there is a female RF jack on back of the consoles, which allows one to easily replace the RF cable with a standard RCA to RCA jack with the length of cable that a person wants to use. However on 100% of all Odyssey 2 consoles the RF cable is hardwired to the console, and one has to take apart the console to replace the RF cable. One big negative of 100% of the Odyssey 2 consoles is that the RF channel 3 and 4 selector switch is located inside the console, therefore one needs to take the console apart to flip the RF switch to either channel 3 or 4. This is unheard of and even the old 1977 Atari 2600 system along with all other systems that I know of have the RF switch on the outside of the console. There are people that complain that the Odyssey 2 has a bad RF picture and sound quality. However I found that the 1979 Odyssey 2 console has a excellent quality RF modulator. The problem people normally are having is with the old RG-59 22 gauge unshielded cable causing the problem. I opened up one of the Odyssey 2 consoles and replaced the RF cable with a short shielded cable connected to a gold plated female RCA jack (see attached pictures). This allows me to connect any RCA to RCA shielded RG6 18 gauge cable between 3 to 100 feet in length with good picture and sound quality results. As far as I am aware at the time of this post their exists no third party native HDMI, component video, or S-Video upgrade kits for the Odyssey 2 . However their exists native RGB and composite video upgrade kits for the Odyssey 2. Overall I found that the Odyssey 2 has a excellent build quality and is very easy to open up and work on when compared to other systems. There are very few Odyssey 2 systems that are actually defective since the Magnavox build quality of the controllers, motherboard, keyboard, and other components after around 41 years was very reliable. Compared to opening up the CoelcoVision/ADAM, the Odyssey 2 is super easy for the average person to get open and to close back up. My 1982 ColecoVision videogame system and my 1983 Coleco ADAM outperforms the Odyssey 2 in both graphics and sound quality. The ColecoVision had a few third party voice games without any voice module, and the ADAM had a third party Eve Speech module that improved voice capabilities. The 1979 Intellivision had better video and sound when compared to the Odyssey 2, and the Intellivision could also speak with a add on voice unit. Even the Atari 2600 videogame system had better graphics quality when compared to the Odyssey 2. When I played Football, Baseball and many other sports and action games, the ColecoVision sports games and action games are much better. Some of the videogames for the Odyssey 2 system grew on me after using them for a while this month, like Invaders from Hyperspace was nice and K.C. Munchkin was unique. In fact, Philips and Magnavox ended up being sued by ATARI and Midway for K.C. Munchkin and was ordered by the court to pull the videogame from store shelfs and to stop manufacturing K.C. Munchkin because the maze game was too similar to the Pacman videogame. I never felt like I was playing Pacman, since the K.C. Munchkin is very different then Pacman. If one does not eat all the dots on the screen before being killed, the maze starts over. K.C, Munchkin does have better graphics and sound when compared to the original ATARI 2600 version of Pacman. However, the Atari 2600 version of MS. Pacman and Junior Pacman is much better then K.C. Munchkin. To be fair one has to compare the exact same videogame title that was released on the Atari 2600 to the exact same title released on the Odyssey 2 to say for sure which system is better. The problem is in North America there was no third-party support for the Odyssey 2 system, which made it impossible to compare exact same videogame titles. The Odyssey 2 has more limited color palette when compared to the Atari 2600. The big advantage of the Odyssey 2 was its keyboard (but no arrow keys or backspace as far as I can tell), and the voice module was a nice feature over most videogame systems at the time. With the keyboard it allowed Odyssey 2 users to use unique education games, etc. However even though the Odyssey 2 system was not as popular as some other systems, it was popular enough to sell as many systems as the ColecoVision (2 million sold). Also I liked the build quality of the 41 year old Odyssey 2 system with perfect operating controllers after 41 years old. As I spent more time with the Odyssey 2 system, the voice module enhanced cartridges started to grow on me. I have not tried every videogame for the Odyssey 2, just over a dozen so far. However, the 1982 “You Type It Talks” cartridge was very unique”. You place the cartridge into the Odyssey 2 voice module cartridge slot and just about any paragraph you type, the Odyssey 2 system will read back in a computerized voice. Back in 1982 this would have been really unique for a kid or adult to play with. This is a unique program that would require both a computer keyboard and voice module on any other computer system of that day in order to duplicate the performance of the “You Type It Talks” cartridge. Then I inserted the sequel to K.C. Munchkin called K.C. Krazy Chase, and was amazed at the graphics and sound, especially the sound. For the first time while using the Odyssey 2 I was hearing actual human quality speech from the K.C. Krazy Chase videogame and not some computerized voice. The Odyssey 2 does have some amazing voice quality, just try K.C. Krazy Chase with the voice module attached. But I have to say that the talking in K.C. Krazy Chase can sometimes be too much, and at times too much voice activity in my opinion. What ended up being one of my most favorite videogames for the Odyssey 2 system that I have tried so far is called “Attack of the Timelord”, which is also voice enhanced. Attack of the Timelord has a nice balance and does not over use the voice speaking technology. Attack of the Timelord is unique and its different then Space Invaders and different then Galaxian or Gorf. Attack of the Timelord while the graphics are lacking, the speed and game play is very fast like a modern videogame. Attack of the TimeLord is one of my favorite videogames on the Odyssey 2, amazing speed, and quality that I have not seen on the Atari 2600 and Intellivision systems (Maybe such a game could be done for other systems, but that is the problem when one does not have the exact same titles to play on each videogame system, it makes it harder to determine the quality of the system). The 1979 Odyssey 2 computer/videogame system was a unique experience, and while the graphics and sound quality are lacking when compared to the ColecoVision/ADAM, the ability to have a keyboard and voice module was two of the Odyssey 2 systems major strengths. This is why they were at least able to sell around 2 million consoles. For the Odyssey 2 system to be more popular they needed to have some third party support which they never received in North America, and they needed to have some arcade classics. It is my understanding that Turtles was the only official arcade game released for the Odyssey 2 in North America, however at the time of this writing I have never played or seen it. I heard that in Europe that Parker Brothers released many arcade ports for the Odyssey 2 like Qbert, Popeye, Super Cobra, and Frogger. Also there was a completed Tutankham videogame for the Odyssey 2 in Europe but it was never officially released. However looking online the Atari 2600 version of Popeye and Frogger has better graphics and sound quality when compared to the Odyssey 2. The Odyssey 2 system in the ideal world should have been designed to have just as good of graphics and sound as the Atari 2600 or better yet should have been designed to be better than the Intellivision. They had the advantage of a full size keyboard and voice module, but they needed to standardize their controller ports, power ports, and RF ports instead of offering two different versions. While there are some unique videogames for the Odyssey 2, I still prefer the quality of both the Intellivision and Atari 2600. Even the Atari 2600 had better overall videogames. The 1979 Odyssey 2 could have been a more popular system if it would had had more support and one of the reasons it did not have more support is because overall many of the videogames made for that system did not have graphics and sound quality as good as other systems like the Atari 2600. While I have not played the Parker Brothers Odyssey 2 arcade ports from Europe, one can clearly see from online videos that the Atari 2600 Parker Brother titles are better quality for graphics and sound. The Odyssey 2 like the Atari 2600 and Intellivision system is lacking an expansion module interface to add more memory, sound capabilities, unless the cartridge port is used to expand the system. The 1982 ColecoVision was unique in its ability to be able to expand the system by using the front expansion module interface, where as most all other videogame systems of its time required the use of the cartridge slot to add new improved hardware to the videogame console. People will always remember the classic exclusive videogames like Attack of the Timelord and others that are only offered on the Odyssey 2. The Odyssey 2 build quality and the fairly easy ways to open and close the console for repairs is nice. I do prefer the Odyssey 2 system over the Arcadia 2001, since there are some nice videogames that make use of the keyboard and voice module. Every system has its pluses and minus, and the Odyssey 2 system was as popular as the ColecoVision in terms of overall sells, but unlike the ColecoVision, the Odyssey 2 ended up being a less popular videogame systems with no third party support in North America. However in the 21st Century one of the reasons why the ColecoVision/ADAM still has a lot of third party support, is because people are starting to understand that the ColecoVision/ADAM was the best quality videogame system that was similar in some ways to its more powerful replacement called the Nintendo Entertainment System (Both the NES and Amiga computer were more powerful in late 1985 when compared to the CoelcoVision/ADAM which went out of production in January of 1985).
  14. If one needs a replacement power supply for their Nintendo Entertainment System, then the best 100% compatible power supply to get is the TRIAD WAU090-1200 that was engineered in the USA and made in China using high quality materials. The original NES-002 power supply had a cord that is around 8 feet 4 inches long. This TRIAD WAU090-1200 Nintendo NES compatible power supply has a cord that is 6 feet long according to the spec sheet (However my actual TRIAD had a real world length of 6 feet 7 inches). As of February 10th 2016, all external power supplies manufactured for use in the United States and imported into the United States is required to have the energy efficiency level VI rating per the Department of Energy law. Dealers in the United State that have old stock of power supplies, are allowed under the law to sell their old stock of power supplies as long as those power supplies were manufactured and imported into the United States before Feb 10th 2016. In 2020 many AC to DC power supplies one purchases online are level VI complaint. However AC to AC power supplies are not in demand, since most modern consumer products in the 21st Century use AC to DC power supplies, therefore there are some USA dealers that still have old stock of AC to AC power supplies that they imported into the United States before February 10th 2016, that they are trying to get rid off at clearance prices. However, there are also many third-party companies producing both AC to AC and AC to DC external power supplies that are made in China, and violating the Department of Energy level VI compliant rules put in place back in February 10th 2016. *** I have done a massive amount of research and as far as I aware the TRIAD Magnetics company is the only company that makes AC to AC external power supplies that have the required energy efficiency level VI defined by the DOE Docket Number EERE-2008-BT-STD-0005-0219. *** TRIAD engineers the power supplies in the United States and has the power supplies made in China using very high quality parts and material. While external AC to DC power supplies that are level VI complaint started appearing on the USA market in late 2015 or early 2016, the first TRIAD AC to AC level VI complaint power supplies started appearing on the USA market around January 24th 2017. Here is the detailed spec sheet for the TRIAD WAU090-1200 that is ideal for use with the Nintendo Entertainment System. The cheapest price for the TRIAD WAU090-1200 is around $20-$25 when purchased online. This is a heavy transformer based power supply since light weight switching based consumer AC to AC power supplies have not been invented yet and might never be invented because of lack of demand for AC to AC power supplies. At the time of this post Newark sells the TRIAD WAU090-1200 for $19.63 each plus free shipping on orders over $150. Another dealer called Mouser Electronics has the TRIAD WAU090-1200 for $16.36 + $7.99 for shipping (total price around $24.35). *** This is a top of the line power supply for the Nintendo Entertainment System. This power supply has excellent build quality. *** This high-end third party power supply is a direct replacement for the original NES-002 power supply · 100% compatible with the original NES-101 front loading model that was released in 1985. · 100% compatible with the original NES-101 top loading model that was released in 1993. ** Not compatible with the Super Nintendo Entertainment System ** This is a factory new 100% compatible power supply for the Nintendo Entertainment System. This is a high-end replacement power supply for the Nintendo Entertainment System. This power supply is a high-quality consumer AC power supply that is designed for North America and has an input voltage of 120 volts AC at 60Hz. Rated output voltage is 9 volts AC at 1.2 amps. Since all consumer AC to AC power supplies on the market use unregulated voltage designs, there is a load curve from zero to full load. When this power supply is connected to the Nintendo Entertainment System, it will output the proper voltage just like the original Nintendo NES-002 power supply. More information about this can be found in the Questions and Answers section. Power supply has UL listed safety certification for the United States market and CUL safety certification for the Canadian markets (UL safety certificate number E341931). Efficiency Level VI certified by the Department of Energy (DOE): Consuming up to 25% less power than previous 60 Hertz AC power supplies, this line of AC power supplies was among the first to meet the U.S. Department of Energy’s Level VI efficiency standard. This is slightly larger than similar products of lesser efficiency, as higher-grade core materials are needed to meet the Level VI requirements. RoHS Complaint power supply Engineered in the United States and made in China using high quality materials. Output cord is 6 feet long. 10 year warranty offered directly by the manufacture of the power supply. Questions and Answers Question: What Nintendo products is this power supply compatible with? Answer: This third-party power supply is a direct replacement for the original NES-002 power supply. This power supply is for use only with the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES-101). This power supply works with both the NES-101 front loading model released in 1985 and the top loading model released in 1993. However, this power supply is not compatible with the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, since that system uses a different type of power supply. Question: How does the quality of this third-party AC to AC power supply compare to my original Nintendo Entertainment System power supply with a model number of NES-002? Answer: This power supply is slightly better quality when compared to the original Nintendo power supply. There have been major improvements in the design of AC to DC power supplies over the last 40+ years, however in the last 40+ years there has only been minor improvements when it comes to AC to AC power supplies. In fact, finding an AC to AC power supply on the market is rare since many companies have decided to only make DC power supplies. This AC to AC power supply is UL listed which is a safety certification for the USA market. In addition, this power supply has the Canadian CUL safety certification. This power supply has the required Energy Efficiency Level VI certification by the Department of Energy (DOE). This power supply is RoHS complaint too. Currently this is the only level VI approved AC power supply on the North American market that will work with the Nintendo Entertainment System. Question: The original Nintendo NES-002 power supply has a label on it that says it outputs 9 volts AC at 1.3 amps. Why does this third party power supply have a label on it that says it outputs 9 volts AC at 1.2 amps? Answer: The Nintendo Entertainment System will never use more than 0.85 amps, therefore any 9 volt AC power supply that offers a minimum of 0.85 amps capacity will work with the NES as long as the power cord has the correct plug style at the end of the cord. This third-party power supply is an ideal power supply for use with the Nintendo Entertainment System. However, to answer your original question of why this third-party power supply has 0.1 amps less capacity when compared to the original NES-002 power supply. Back in 2015 there use to be 9 volt AC to AC power supplies in production that had higher capacities like 1.5 amps. At the end of the year 2015 all 9 volt AC power supplies designed for the USA consumer market went out of production, and when the new Feb 2016 level VI energy efficiency law went into effect by the Department of Energy, AC to AC power supply companies decided to design only 9 volt AC to AC power supplies with a maximum capacity of 1.2 amps for the consumer market. It is technically possible for a power supply company to make a level VI approved 9 volt AC to AC power supply with higher capacities like 1.5 amps output and even higher outputs, however it would cost around $15,000 to get such a power supply UL tested. Because of the lack of demand for AC to AC power supplies there is a possibility that no company will every make a 9 volt AC to AC power supply with a 1.3 amp or 1.5 amp capacity that is level VI rated. The premium materials and overdesign required to meet Level VI makes the parts more expensive. Also, the $15,000 investment for UL testing makes it hard for power supply companies to justify designing a second generation of higher capacity level VI approved AC to AC power supplies. What is the real-world voltage output on the Nintendo NES-002 power supply and this third-party power supply when under a load? Answer: Unregulated AC to AC power supplies are much more complicated when compared to regulated AC to DC power supplies that most people normally use. All consumer AC to AC power supplies on the market have unregulated designs, which means there is a load curve from zero load to full load. For example, the original Nintendo NES-002 power supply label on it says 9 volts AC at 1.3 amps, and under real world conditions has a no-load voltage of around 10.38 volts AC. When the original Nintendo NES-002 power supply is under a load from the Nintendo Entertainment System, it is outputting around 9.82 volts AC. When the Nintendo NES-002 power supply is connected to the Nintendo Entertainment System, it never outputs 9 volts AC, and will always output around 9.82 volts AC when under a load. The reason for the 9.82 volts AC output on the NES-002 unregulated power supply is because the Nintendo Entertainment System never uses more then 0.85 amps. The only way to get the original unregulated Nintendo NES-002 AC power supply to output around 9 volts AC would be to disconnect it from the Nintendo Entertainment System and place it on an actual hardware device that would draw around 1.3 amps, then the voltage would drop down to around 9 volts AC because of the load curve. This third-party power supply that has a label on it that says 9 volts AC at 1.2 amps works perfectly with the Nintendo Entertainment System and according to the load curve data is almost a perfect match. For example, this third-party power supply according to the specs has a voltage rating of 11.6 volts AC when there is no load (zero current draw). Under real world conditions I measured around 11.09 volts AC when there is no load. However as soon as the Nintendo Entertainment System is drawing a load, this third party power supply outputs around 10.26 volts AC. Around 10.26 volts AC is the proper voltage to use with the Nintendo Entertainment System and is almost a perfect match according to the load curve data (there is only 0.44 volts difference between the two power supplies, which is really good when comparing unregulated power supplies to each other). Using this third-party power supply, the Nintendo Entertainment System will not drop below 10.26 volts AC while under a load. This third-party AC power supply because of the unregulated voltage curve will only output around 9 volts AC when under a full load of 1.2 amps, and the Nintendo Entertainment System never uses more than 0.85 amps. Since the original Nintendo NES-002 power supply outputs around 9.82 volts AC when under a load, this third-party power supply with a voltage output of around 10.26 volts AC is almost a perfect match (there is only 0.44 volts difference between the two power supplies, which is good when comparing unregulated power supplies to each other). Question: Can I use this power supply with other products that I own that need 9 volts AC and what would happen if the current draw on the device I connect to this power supply starts to draw more than 1.2 amps? Answer: Because of the load curve on all consumer unregulated AC power supplies, one needs to be careful with the products they use this power supply with. The load curve for this power supply under real word conditions is between 11.09 volts to 9 volts AC. This power supply will only output around 9 volts AC when the load is 1.2 amps. Since the Nintendo Entertainment System never draws more than 0.85 amps of power, then this power supply outputs around 10.26 volts AC when used with the Nintendo Entertainment System. However, one should never use this power supply with a product that requires more than 1.2 amps, since the voltage would drop below 9 volts AC and destroy the power supply. Unregulated AC power supplies have a small safety margin where the fuse in the power supply will not open if there is a brief current draw that goes over the 1.2 amps for only a few seconds. AC to AC transformers are not designed for the user to exceed the output current. Given an overload condition, they will start to heat-up and internal built-in safety mechanisms (fuse) will open, permanently destroying the power supply. These power supplies are sealed at the factory and were not designed to be opened up for a user to replace the fuse, also the 10-year manufactory warranty would most likely not be honored if the consumer abused the power supply and went over the stated current of 1.2 amps. Question: Why is this power supply only offered in North America, what if I wanted to use this power supply on 220 volts at 50Hz? Answer: This power supply would be permanently destroyed and the internal fuse would blow if connected to 220 volts at 50Hz. All consumer AC to AC power supplies are made for either 120 volts AC at 60Hz or 220 volts AC at 50Hz. In the 21st Century major technological advances have been made on worldwide regulated AC to DC power supplies that work between 100-240 volts AC at 50-60Hz. However, because of that lack of consumer demand for unregulated AC to AC power supplies being used in the 21st Century, the research and development costs have not been spent to make AC to AC power supplies work worldwide between 100-240 volt AC at 50-60Hz. Therefore, all consumer AC to AC power supplies for the North America market are still designed to only work with 120 volts at 60Hz. There are power supply companies in Europe that do make AC to AC power supplies that work at only 220 volts at 50Hz, and one might be able to locate one that works with the Nintendo Entertainment System.
  15. My very first videogame system that I owned was the ColecoVision that I purchased around August of 1982. Then in October of 1983 I purchased the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer that included a Super Game Module with more advanced videogames up to 256K in size on Digital Data Packs. The ColecoVision/ADAM was the most advanced videogame system between the years 1982 to 1985. However, in January of 1985 Coleco stop production on both the ColecoVision and ADAM. This was a business decision during the 1983 to 1985 videogame crash. Since they were shutting down Coleco had no plans to release a new 8 bit or 16-bit second generation videogame and computer system to replace the ColecoVision/ADAM. Coleco sold over 2 million ColecoVisions and over 500,000 ADAM systems. For the very first time I just purchased a used original 1985 Nintendo Entertainment system After the videogame and computer crash in the United States, Nintendo saw a new opportunity to release a videogame system called the Nintendo Entertainment system (NES) on October 18th 1985 in North America. For the very first time a videogame system more powerful than the ColecoVision/ADAM was released. The Nintendo Entertainment system was so popular that it sold around 62 million consoles worldwide. Both the Nintendo Entertainment system and Commodore Amiga that came out in 1985 were more powerful when compared to the ColecoVision/ADAM. However, as the years went on I kept using my Coleco ADAM computer system for around 10 years for word processing and still use the Coleco ADAM for classic videogames that are exclusive to that system. Between the years 1983 to around 1993 the Coleco ADAM was my only computer system, until I purchased an IBM compatible with Windows 3.1. My first experience with the Nintendo Entertainment system was in the late 80’s while visiting a relative. I ended up playing the NES at the relatives’ house. However just recently in the last year or two I have been purchasing some older classic 70’s and 80’s videogame and computer systems that I have only used in retail stores in the past around 40 years ago. I purchased a used Nintendo Entertainment system recently. I am amazed at the graphics and sound quality of the NES, which does beat my ColecoVision/ADAM system. The NES videogames have 64 sprites and some game cartridges are around 1MB in size. While someone did make Mario Brothers for the ColecoVision, Super Mario Brothers does not exist for the ColecoVision. I was amazed at the graphics and sound quality of Super Mario Bothers on the NES. However, while the NES most of the time has better graphics and sound then the ColecoVision. Some videogames like Donkey Kong and Donkey Kong Junior are better quality on the Coleco ADAM when compared to the NES. The Coleco ADAM versions of Donkey Kong and Donkey Kong Junior contain all the intermissions with all the screens. So, in the 80’s the best version of Donkey Kong was on the Coleco ADAM with all 4 screens including the conveyor belt stage. Also a former Coleco employee leaked to the ADAM community in the early 80’s the unreleased 5 screen version of Donkey Kong Junior (only the 4 screen version was released). I heard that in the year 2010 that in Europe that a special version of Donkey Kong was released for the NES that has for the first time all the intermissions with all 4 screens. However, I have never seen or played this 2010 version. There is a possibility that this new 2010 version of Donkey Kong for the NES might be better when compared to the original Donkey Kong the supergame that was released for the Coleco ADAM in 1984. I like the NES Zapper light gun which was a controller style not found on most home videogame systems in the 70’s and early 80’s. While I like the original NES controller, it lacked the keypad controller that was offered on other system like the ColecoVision/ADAM. With a keypad controller unique education and other unique games could have been developed for the NES (most people prefer arcade and action games which are perfect for the existing NES controller, NES kept their controller simple and easy for the average person to use. That is one reason why the ATARI 2600 was popular since it had a simple controller with not too many buttons). The standalone Coleco ADAM had a composite video and audio output, however to get audio a special DIN plug needed to be used (The ColecoVision only had RF output). As far as I am aware the very first videogame system that used standard female RCA jacks for composite video and audio output was the NES system. That is a nice design on the NES to have standard composite video and audio jacks. Too many 20th century videogame systems require a special adapter plug to get the best possible quality to one’s display/TV system. The good thing about all modern 21st Century videogame systems in the last 10 to 15 years, is that they all use some type of HDMI style connector to interface the videogame system to one’s projector or flat panel display. The original 1985 NES has a 48-pin card edge connector expansion port on the bottom of the console that no company has every made a hardware device for. However reading online to access the 48 pin connector one has to cut or break the plastic tab on the door to gain access to the connector. Both Mattel and Nintendo made it really difficult to gain access to the expansion interface (The Mattel computer module and voice module have issues accessing the connector that sometimes is missing from the motherboard). At least the ColecoVision and ADAM has an easy plastic door to access the expansion module. The Coleco ADAM has 4 expansion ports (1 external and 3 internal that are easy to access). The 1982 ColecoVision system has a nice onscreen logo that tells people that they need to turn off the videogame system before inserting a cartridge or expansion module. That is rare for a 80's system, and was not even offered on the NES. The NES instead has a flashing LED light with a blue screen that flashes instead of having a onscreen logo that tells people that they do not have a cartridge inserted. The biggest negative of the original 1985 NES videogame console was that the front-loading cartridge design became known as a major problem since many people had to replace their 72-pin connector which was easily damaged with bent pins when a cartridge is inserted several times. As a solution to the original NES front loading cartridge design flaw that showed up after many months or years of cartridge inserts, Nintendo released the NES-101 top loading cartridge model in 1993, which was a more reliable cartridge inserting and ejection system. However, the original 1985 NES has better picture and sound quality because of the standard composite video and audio output. To make the USA NES 1993 top loader cheaper, that top loading model only has a RF output. It really is a bad decision 8 years later to rerelease a new NES version for North America without at least composite or S-Video output. In 1993 TV sets with composite video inputs was a standard feature, and some what rare on some TV’s in 1985. Today in the 21st Century people use a NES emulator with HDMI on their Windows PC or a third-party console to play NES games. There is many third-party video game consoles that accept NES, SNES, and Genesis game cartridges from one console, and then they output to HDMI and sometimes an analog video options like S-Video and composite if one does not want to use HDMI. The several 3 in one NES, SNES, and Genesis consoles with HDMI output sell for around $75-$100 on EBAY and other websites (These are the best option since they have 3 videogame cartridge slots from one videogame console). However other people prefer to do an internal HDMI upgrade to their original NES console that they have had since 1985+. The original 1985 NES can do native HDMI with no anlaog to digital conversion if one internally modifies their NES console for HDMI. I am wondering if it would be possible to make a HDMI graphics card that would plug into the bottom NES 48 pin expansion port since there is direct access to some of the pins on the CPU. Bypass the NTSC composite video and audio pins on the connector and use the + 5 volts, ground, and accessing some of the CPU pins might result in creating an interface to an external HDMI graphics card chip compatible to the NES, without needing to open the console up. +-------\ +5V -- |01 48| -- +5V Gnd -- |02 47| -- Gnd Audio in -> |03 46| -- NC /NMI <- |04 45| -> out 2 ($4016 write data, bit 2) A15 <- |05 44| -> out 1 ($4016 write data, bit 1) EXP9 ?? |06 43| -> out 0 ($4016 write data, bit 0, strobe on sticks) EXP8 ?? |07 42| ?? EXP0 EXP7 ?? |08 41| ?? EXP1 EXP6 ?? |09 40| ?? EXP2 EXP5 ?? |10 39| ?? EXP3 ($4017 read strobe) /OE for joypad 2 <- |11 38| ?? EXP4 joypad 1 D1 -> |12 37| -> /OE for joypad 1 ($4016 read strobe) joypad 1 D3 xx |13 36| xx joypad 1 D4 /IRQ <> |14 35| xx joypad 1 D0 joypad 2 D2 -> |15 34| -> duplicate of pin 37 joypad 2 D3 xx |16 33| <- joypad 1 D2 duplicate of pin 11 <- |17 32| <> CPU D0 joypad 2 D4 xx |18 31| <> CPU D1 joypad 2 D0 xx |19 30| <> CPU D2 joypad 2 D1 -> |20 29| <> CPU D3 Video out <- |21 28| <> CPU D4 Audio out <- |22 27| <> CPU D5 unregulated power adapter vdd -- |23 26| <> CPU D6 4.00MHz CIC CLK <- |24 25| <> CPU D7 +-------/ https://wiki.nesdev.com/w/index.php/Expansion_port
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