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darryl1970

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darryl1970 last won the day on July 3 2017

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About darryl1970

  • Rank
    Dragonstomper
  • Birthday 11/13/1970

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Ohio
  • Interests
    PC's, Graphic design, Web Design, Classic Video Games, Classic Gaming Homebrew Scene.
  • Currently Playing
    Classic arcade games, classic home systems, and a few modern thrown in.
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    Probably the same ole...

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  1. Thanks for the info. Thanks! So, should I add this to the thread as an Ultimate Cart version?
  2. Thanks. I know. I have visited the site. I really think that could have turned around the fate of the 5200. They really started to show the system's potential toward the end of life.
  3. I think this is great. Part of the "retro" vibe for me is remembering the way it was in the day. Back in the day, part of the excitement was to be thankful for each detail that was able to be reproduced. Limitations were the expectation. Everything that was overcome, in order to bring an arcade hit home, was a gift. We just knew that our systems had single-color sprites, limited sprites, memory limitations, and lower resolution. In fact, since there are so many great homebrews now, I sometimes notice that those who were not around in 82-84 do not realize the systems have these limitations. Any "tricks" to get around these limitations were/are a gift. I personally looked forward to seeing what "miracles" the programmers would squeeze out of the system. Of course some of these modern-day tricks might have been limited by the cartridge size cost restrictions, dev environments, and development time deadlines. For a long time, I was perplexed at how the A8/5200 Galaxian had multi-colored stars in the background. (I get it now, but still some cool trickery to figure out back in the day!) The stars scrolled so smoothly, and they didn't disrupt the on-screen enemies. (Another reason I hated the 7800 Galaga and it's huge white periods for a starfield. lol.) Just for the record, I know that the 7800 is much more capable than the Galaga port would indicate. It probably falls short more due to being a release title, memory limitations, and deadlines, but it's crazy to see the previous generation hardware run smoother and have more accurate mathematical pattern formations, while rendering software sprites. It truly demonstrates the raw power the A8s had to spare. (Hopefully somebody will remake the 7800 for the XM, utilizing the FM sound chip and cleaning up the graphics, and enemy patterns!) As this is now, I would have been blown away to see this in 82-84. I realize there is a long way to go. The swelling and contracting of the aliens in formation does add to the challenge. However, if that ends up being a system limitation, for example, I would personally say this is already beyond what my expectations would have been.
  4. I'd sue them if they do not honor it! LOL
  5. If the 7800 had a 5200 adapter, people could have played games with the volume up. Haha! (But seriously...) In all seriousness, I love the layout and concept of the 5200 joysticks, but they were not production ready. A 5200 adapter for the 7800 would have required people to buy $50-each, unreliable, joysticks. That's another reason a 5200 adapter would have been a tough way to go. I understand why people never gave the sticks a chance. If I hadn't been able to fix mine, I would have hated them too. The analog control, along with the keypad, added a lot to games like RS Baseball. Self-centering would have made the adjustment easier for those lacking in co-ordination. The 7800 adapter would have definitely helped me to feel less abandoned. However, I would have been bewildered by the lacking sound. That may have changed if Atari made it to the point of adding onboard sound chips. Being naive at the time, the adapter would have kept me from feeling the disappointment that the 5200 never saw its true potential. I wouldn't have felt abandoned. So, from trying to put myself into where I was in 1983, I think the adapter to play 7800 would have been the best user experience.
  6. This is SO impressive. The 5200 and A8s never saw their full potential. While the 7800 version didn't tap the true potential of that machine, this blows that version away in terms of smoothness. The star field doesn't look like huge, white periods. The patterns, although preliminary, are more accurate. Of course the sound has potential to be even better. It great to finally see a proof of concept. Thanks for sharing this. ;)
  7. A couple other C-64 flaws: Kickman doesn't pop the balloons when they are full stack. Only the top balloon pops. That means one will need to kick a balloon. When a balloon is kicked, another one automatically falls. There can be at least 3 balloons floating around. Since the falling balloons do not connect with Kickman's stack, it is impossible to "trap" the balloons. When Pac-Man is eating the stacked balloons. It is possible to move Kickman. Pac-Man will then miss the remaining balloons. This rivals some of the worst ports I've seen. It's deceptive, because it LOOKS like it would be great.
  8. I would guess that the C-64 could handle a terrific version. My comment was mostly a jab at the programmers and props to the VCS programmers. HAL completely looked at it from a snapshot perspective vs a study of the gameplay. It was an earlier title for the 64, so there was a learning curve. However, the C-64 was pretty user-friendly. Maybe they weren't paid enough to spend much time on it.
  9. I just saw this for the first time. I sent a MakoPad to Goodwill a few years ago. I remember thinking it was a very comfortable gamepad. Too bad I didn't realize the potential!
  10. I might miss a few, but a few from memory: 1. If your player kicks a balloon, another will fall, even on the first level. 2. Falling balloons go through the stack on your head, so it is not possible to trap a balloon on one side of the screen. 3. If you kick Pac-Man, he doesn't go back into the formation. 2 and 3 are pretty essential to gameplay. I know there's more. It's amazing the lack of detail from the programmer. The game looks decent though, especially for the time. #1 is really bad, because the balloons will actually get out of sync. I can't explain it, but it's like the balloons are on a timer instead of waiting for one to finish. If I kick balloon A, B falls. Before I get B, another one will fall on the opposite end of the screen. It creates impossible situations.
  11. I am late to the party, so please forgive me if this has already been pointed out; but..... This plays 250% better than the Commodore 64 version. lol. How does the VCS follow most of the arcade "rules" with 4k, but the C-64 has such a crap port? These things make me laugh. Great fine. Thanks for sharing with the community!
  12. The ROMs on page 1 should be the most recent.
  13. Has anybody ever fixed the enemy logic on this version. It seems the enemy speed is backward from what it should be. This is a major flaw in the game (as well as the VCS version), which really ruins the experience.
  14. Olive throws the missiles: hearts, notes, and HELP!
  15. The bottles would look good sideways, if there was enough room. I think they may only be 4x8 (double wide pixels, due to multi-color mode). It really limits what can be done with them. In addition to that, with a lot of background area, they would also look odd when floating over the staircases. There are a lot of limitations that we discovered as projects progressed. It gives me a newfound respect for those who didn't have the awesome tools we have today. Add that to long compile times, deadlines, memory restrictions, etc., and it really raises my appreciation. I hacked the NES Popeye too. I was hoping to make it more arcade-like. I figured the extra resolution and extra colors would make it easy to upgrade it to a more arcade-like look. When I got in, I realized the programmers had positioned certain sprites to keep too many sprites from being rendered on the same horizontal line. Also, the sprites were short. It limited what I was able to do. PopeyeArcade(DEG) 3.bmp
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