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Multijointed Monster Maker

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Posts posted by Multijointed Monster Maker


  1. Sorry, I don't mean to be rude, but does anybody besides me find Capcom's graphical style annoying? I always felt like Capcom always takes too much time working on background details and not enough time working on animation. If I was working on Demon's Crest I would've gave less ROM devoted on background tiles and more ROM devoted to sprite frames.


  2. Rpgs are by far more about graphics over gameplay, and people getting impressed by nothing, than the Donkey Kong Country series. Donkey Kong Country atleast had everything actually moving, and an actual game inside the cartridge. Rpgs on the other hand were just a bunch of static images that do nothing at all. I even find Super Mario World to be far more impressive than any Final Fantasy or Chrono Trigger, simply because the sprites actually moved and interacted with eachother.


  3. @koolkitty: no it's not the transparency part that I find impressive, its the hdma scrolling and scaling that I find kind've impressive. I said "kind've" meaning that because I do Snes programming in my own time, its clear to me how that trick was done.

     

    If you ask me what I would find impressive in an Snes game is seeing software rotated sprites, because of all the complicated math and asm optimizations it takes, including converting between packed and planar. Over this last weekend I've been trying to get the Snes to rotate sprites through software. I've managed getting an 8x8 sprite to rotate in real-time while running my game at the same, but I have a hardtime getting a 16x16 sprite to rotate in real-time without adding a lot of extra slowdown to my game. I need to figure out a way of breaking sprites down into smaller chunks to rotate in several consecutive frames, so it doesn't add extra lag to the gameplay.


  4.  

     

     

     

    What?

     

    That statement is nonsense! It had loads that pushed it to its limits, the very fact they started to put chips in the carts to do what they wanted it to do proves the point.

     

    Oh yeah, I forgot about games with chips like StarFox and Yoshi's Island. Looking at a lot of later Genesis games, developers seemed to "play" with the system more, where programmers found creative uses for sprites instead of just using them as sprites. A lot of later Super Nintendo games were just your standard/traditional sprites-on-a-background games with pretty colors. Donkey Kong Country series had some creative uses for background layers though.

     

    Loads more games used chips for various reasons: (including a launch title) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Super_NES_enhancement_chips

     

    Note that Pitfall II also used an on-cart coprocessor with added sound and graphics capabilities. (the Display Processor Chip)

     

    Then there's the various mapper chips used in the NES. (SMB 3 comes to mind, but there are many other examples)

     

    Not sure what you mean on the BG layers of DKC, other than using the somewhat uncommon mode 1 with 3 scroll layers (the 3rd layer limited to 4 color tiles -Earthworm Jim 2 used it in the first stage too) it's not anything special. The prerendered graphics specially optimized to 15-color tile/sprite graphics on the SNES is fairly impressive (and costly), and it took a rather large cart to manage that too. (4 MB)

    Sprites are often used for things other than players/enemies, it's common practice, especially on platforms supporting numerous sprites. (used for portions of the BG and such, namely moving/animated portions)

     

     

    In DKC2, they use the third background layer as a fake 3D ocean that floods through levels.


  5. I beleive one of the reasons why Genesis games seem to look smoother, has to do with the resolution. Because there are more horizontal pixels, scrolling a background doesn't have the blocky descrete steps the Snes has when it is scrolling a background. Genesis seems to be better at accelerating a backgound with variation in scrolling speed, while snes games always seem to be either scrolling or not.


  6. What?

     

    That statement is nonsense! It had loads that pushed it to its limits, the very fact they started to put chips in the carts to do what they wanted it to do proves the point.

     

    Oh yeah, I forgot about games with chips like StarFox and Yoshi's Island. Looking at a lot of later Genesis games, developers seemed to "play" with the system more, where programmers found creative uses for sprites instead of just using them as sprites. A lot of later Super Nintendo games were just your standard/traditional sprites-on-a-background games with pretty colors. Donkey Kong Country series had some creative uses for background layers though.


  7. What I mean is actually two things. One, the classic consoles lasted a very long time and as that console's lifetime progressed, the creators of the games learned how to really get everything possible out of the console. The best examples are the Atari 2600 (1977-92) and the NES (1985-94). For both consoles there are lots of games where you really get the impression that they are REALLY pushing the console (in terms of graphics/sound/speed) with everything it's got, and perhaps uses some programming tricks to make the console do things that previously was not thought possible (especially the Atari 2600). And as an avid classic gamer/collector, I think those kind of games are quite fascinating.

     

    Furthermore, I like how even when the next generation of consoles came out, back then the old console still hung on for a few more years. For example, the NES continued as an active console for three more years after the SNES, and the original Playstation kept going for what, six years after the PS2? You just don't see that in today's consoles; the old console has it's support dropped pretty much immediately (how many N64 games came out after the GameCube's release, and how many GameCube games came out after the Wii?), though the PS2 is still chugging along about five years after the PS3 (but clearly on it's final days). For those who do current consoles, do you ever play any games where you really feel like the console is being pushed to its limits, or do even the best looking games don't really look like it's making the console break a sweat?

     

    It's funny how the Snes was the only classic console that didn't have any games that felt like the system was really being pushed.


  8. :D

    I've been working on my homebrew game today and tested it on several emulators. I don't understand why, but my game runs faster on bsnes than it does on every other emulator I've tried. I'm pretty sure I never noticed a speed difference before, but today it is pretty obvious. I'm wondering what speed my game will run on real hardware, because I enjoy how fast it runs on bsnes.

     

    Do you have sound and video synced, and emulation speed set to normal?

     

    Thankyou. Now Bsnes is working at the same speed as the other emulators. I liked my game playing fast, so I sped up my game-physics to look like how it did on Bsnes before.

     

    Cool, what are you workin on if you dont mind me asking. Its nice to hear about homebrew for the SNES :D

     

    A Gunstar Heroes clone. Infact, today I've been testing a software sprite rotation algorithm; it's not quite fast enough to work in real-time, but thankfully I have 128kB of work ram to use.


  9. I've been working on my homebrew game today and tested it on several emulators. I don't understand why, but my game runs faster on bsnes than it does on every other emulator I've tried. I'm pretty sure I never noticed a speed difference before, but today it is pretty obvious. I'm wondering what speed my game will run on real hardware, because I enjoy how fast it runs on bsnes.

     

    Do you have sound and video synced, and emulation speed set to normal?

     

    Thankyou. Now Bsnes is working at the same speed as the other emulators. I liked my game playing fast, so I sped up my game-physics to look like how it did on Bsnes before.


  10.  

    Each system had it's pluses. The Genesis had a faster processor so it was better at doing action and shoot-em-ups. The SNES had superior sound and video hardware, so it featured better graphics and music.

     

     

    The Genesis was only better at action games and shmups for an average skilled programmer. For a programmer who knows how to write fast code for both consoles, the Snes has 128 max sprites onscreen vs 80 max sprites onscreen for Genesis.


  11. Why do people freak out whenever somebody actually says something true and factual about the Super Nintendo's processing power, yet people get praised for extremist trash talking? Why can't people just perceive it the way it is, instead of over-inflating the problem? I'm sick of people's inflated opinions being percieved as factual data through internet sites.

     

    Are you referring to people talking smack about the SNES's power, or people praising (protecting) it?

     

    Honestly, the SNES had a lot of advantages over other systems of the time, like 3D capability even without the FX chip (all mode 7 games, like HyperZone, Super Mario Kart, Pilot Wings etc.) Plus the sound, music, and color was superb :thumbsup:

    I love me an SNES!

     

    People talking smack about the SNES's power.

     

    I'm tired of every single game review for a run'n'gun or shmup game having an inappropriate snide remark about the Snes's processing power. Such as "There is soo much stuff going on, the Snes's cpu can't handle even half the action without slowing to a crawl!"

     

    I'm also sick of the Snes being thought of as an rpg-only system.

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