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Nathan Strum

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Everything posted by Nathan Strum

  1. Unless your console has allergies. You don't want it sneezing one of your carts across the room.
  2. The Sony model is for NTSC, so it's looking for an NTSC RF input signal, and it outputs only NTSC-compatible composite video. I don't know if Sony made a PAL version. This PAL tuner is available through Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07B1KFT5P/ but I've never tried it. If you get one and try it out, be sure to post about it so others can find out if it works. Good luck!
  3. James - at some point on Friday's show, would you mind running the attached binary on your RGB 2600, and showing it as large as possible? (Make sure the console's warmed up first). I'd like to get a baseline in case we need to adjust some colors for the 21st. Just need it up for a few seconds - long enough for me to get a screen cap. Thanks! - Nathan colors3.bin
  4. A couple of weeks ago, I posted about our students' 2021 Open Show. An eight-hour marathon of animated films, produced over the last two academic years (since we couldn't have a show at all a year ago). For the first time ever we held it online, since we still can't have large screenings in person. But that meant anyone got to watch it! Quite literally, from all over the world. Of course, not everyone wants to sit through an eight-hour show. But this Saturday night, you can instead sit through just a two-hour show! This is our faculty-juried Producers' Show, which is a curated selection of films from the Open Show. The Producers' Show is usually held in a theater in or near Hollywood. We've been at the TV Academy's Leonard H. Goldenson Theatre (although we had to change theaters when they closed it for remodeling), the Director's Guild of America Theater (we had to leave this one because of remodeling too... are they trying to tell us something?), and most recently, the Samuel Goldwyn Theater at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Hmmm... Emmys and Oscars. I wonder if the Grammys have a theater we can borrow? While the Open Show is a public event that everyone can attend in-person (normally), the Producers' Show isn't. You have to reserve a ticket because seating is limited, and they go fast. Studios, sponsors, alumni, students, friends and family... and suddenly boom! There goes 600+ seats. It's quite the industry event. If the animation industry had stars, this would be star-studded. I suppose they're stars of a sort, to animation nerds. But basically, they're still just animation nerds themselves that have had success in the biz. Of one sort or another. Anyway, we can't do the theater thing this year for the Producers' Show, so it's online too. And that means anyone can watch it. No tickets. No limited seating. No restrictions. For 48 hours. Then the sponsors (whoever they are) get exclusive access to it because money. But we'll put it back online later, and I'll put that link up when the time comes. Meanwhile, this Saturday evening at 4:00 PM PST, the 2021 CalArts Character Animation Producers' Show gets streamed live from here: https://watch.redcat.org/landing/REDCAT2345 And by live, I mean completely pre-recorded. But there are two hours of really good films in there. And about 20 minutes of talking. All at the beginning. I'm not suggesting you tune in late or anything. We do have a pretty cool guest speaker. And some of our students will receive awards for their films. But if you're going to order DoorDash or something, have them show up by 4:20. Anyway, check it out. It's pretty cool seeing the amazing work that students can do in the midst of a pandemic. Actually... it's pretty cool any year.
  5. Well whatever you do, don't buy them from this place. I don't know anything about the reliability of the sellers, but I keep hearing their shells don't fit in 7800s very well.
  6. You should add a countdown timer to your signature.
  7. Since the YouTube stream is likely to be blocked because of copyrighted music snippets (thank you, content-matching algorithms ), here's the show on Vimeo: Part 1: Part 2: Part 3 (the 2020 Fall Open Show):
  8. There's a hack of Omega Race that just uses the stock 2600 joystick. It can be found in the Hacks and Homebrews ROM collection here: https://atariage.com/forums/topic/144662-atari-2600-hacks-and-homebrews-rom-collection-v12/?tab=comments#comment-1758233
  9. In previous years, I've posted about our end-of-school-year student film screenings for the Character Animation Program at CalArts (my day job, when I'm not working on homebrews). Let's recap! 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 I wasn't blogging before that. But I've been editing these shows since '93 (when I was still a student!). Anyway... oh, wait a second. Those last two links are broken. Oh Invision! Will you ever fix your blog software? (sad trombone sound) Anyway, a year ago, because of the pandemic, for the first time in the history of the college (that I'm aware of) our screenings were cancelled. We had a mini-show online in the Fall of films that had been turned in over the summer. But we were hoping for our annual show we'd be back in person this spring. Well, that's not going to happen. But, since we've spent the last year figuring out how to do things online, we will be having our full show again this year online. So while we can't all actually be together, we can be virtually together. And that means if you want to watch it with us - you can! Usually, you'd have to drive all the way out to California and sit in an uncomfortable plastic folding chair for eight hours to watch our students' films. But now, you can spend eight hours sitting in an uncomfortable plastic folding chair watching student films from the comfort of your own home! (If you want the true experience, that is. Otherwise, I suppose you could sit on a couch or something.) The show is streaming on YouTube tomorrow night (Saturday, April 24) live, starting at 4:00 PM PST. Here's the link: We will also be posting it to Vimeo afterwards, which I'll post the links to later. (Edit: Links added in comments below.) So stop by, watch some films, eat some popcorn (not provided), and enjoy the show! There are some great films in there! (Note: This show is not intended for kids.) And I'm totally not kidding about the eight hours, either. (Although the last third of the show are the films screened in the Fall. So if you watched those, you can skip out early.)
  10. Well, that would justify a four-hour show. I've heard you mention it before - that's why I guessed it. (Note that he neither confirmed nor denied it. ) I think it would be great. Glenn Saunders and I had discussed the potential of something like that, way back when he first dropped off the Stella at 20 tapes for digitizing. Nothing came of it, because logistically it would have been nearly impossible to conduct interviews literally around the world. However, technology has progressed enough now where that's no big deal. Maintaining the quality would be the key, so any interviews conducted remotely would also need to be recorded locally. But smartphones now have 4K DolbyVision cameras built into them... somehow. So a documentary like that is now well within reach.
  11. I think it's one of three things: The original Mythicon programmers are getting back together to form a new game company. Homebrewers will specifically ask that they not refer to their new games as "homebrews". ZPH will be introducing their newest co-host: Nolan Bushnell. ZPH is getting a new cat named "7800". He won't do anything at first, but 30 years from now he'll really take off.
  12. Welcome back! (Yes... I'm a month late. But I don't get over to the blogs much anymore. Including my own.) I like the LE concept. I may have to adopt it for my own blog's Homebreviews, since I fall victim to the "ugh... that game is going to be sssoooo much work to review" (crawls in a corner and binge watches episodes of Columbo instead) syndrome as well.
  13. So, just how many roads must a man walk down? Please quantify the answer in the form of an integer and show your work.

    1. doctorclu

      doctorclu

      Forty-two.

    2. GoldLeader

      GoldLeader

      ^Another follower of the Guide!!!  

    3. GoldLeader

      GoldLeader

      Laden or unladen?

    4. Show next comments  27 more
  14. Yep - my eyes did the same thing to me when I hit 40. The next time I go to my ophthalmologist, I'm getting a second pair of glasses for working at the computer. My progressives just don't work at that distance.
  15. There are always ways to read old data. Especially in this community. I still have an ancient (working) Mac clone ca. 1996 that boots and runs. So if you do ever run across backup CDs you can't read, let me know!
  16. I recall that James mentioned something about making additional trophies where teams of people were involved, but I don't know if that was speculative or something he was actually planning to offer.
  17. Silly me, I thought this thread was about old Atari socks...
  18. You could almost buy half a VCS with that!
  19. Sorry for the momentary off-topic post. But I felt compelled to put these two responses together for some reason:
  20. So... it's nearly a dollar then. Is that when it's no longer considered a penny stock?
  21. One has a space in the name. One does not. I rarely get them mixed up anymore if I remember that.
  22. I'm not a programmer (nor do I play one on TV...) but I do consider myself a "homebrewer" and I'm particularly proud of that label. As far as I know, the computer use of the term originated with the Homebrew Computer Club, which just about any nerd worth his salt* would've given his eye teeth* to have been a part of. To me it's not a mark of denigration at all. I consider it a privilege to be associated with the programmers that have graciously asked me to work on their games. And it's always done for fun. The fun of creating a game for others to enjoy. The fun of showing off a newly discovered programming trick. The fun of realizing a decades-old dream of creating your own game. The fun of being part of this community. The fun of just making something really cool for the sake of doing it. The documentary "Triumph of the Nerds" referred to it as "Impressing Their Friends". As for professionalism, the programmers I've worked with absolutely obsess over their games. Refining, debugging and honing every last bit to make them the best they can possibly be. And I can speak to Albert's own obsession with producing absolutely first-rate, professional packaging (mainly because of all of the times I've had to go back and fix things after they've gone off to be printed ). And FWIW, AtariAge presently has more 2600 titles than any single publisher ever had, except Atari. And AtariAge is gaining on 'em. As for Audacity, I can see why they wouldn't consider themselves as homebrewers: they programmed 2600 games for a living back-in-the-day. That was their profession, and even though it isn't anymore, it would probably seem weird to them to revisit that part of their careers and rebrand what they're doing as something different. I will say though, that even though they're a "real company", by repeatedly distancing themselves as being "professional" and not hombrewers, they're implying that all homebrews are not professional. And while some are not, I take issue with that sort of blanket generalization. After all, being a "real company" does not guarantee high quality either. Apollo was a real company. Even Mythicon was a real company. Effectively though, they're just as homebrew-y as AtarAge. They even say as much at 10:10 in this interview, where they talk about how each game is handmade by "volunteer manufacturers". Wouldn't a "real company" pay for that labor? To me, whether it's "independent developer", "homebrewer", "third-party programmer", a "real company" or whatever, when it comes to making games for a niche, hobbyist, fan community, it's all the same. It's just semantics until you've got a spot in the aisle at WalMart. In the end, it's really the games that will tell the tale. So far, in this new endeavor, they've made one. * How about that? Two completely antiquated idioms in one sentence!
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