Jump to content

orange808

Members
  • Content Count

    166
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

126 Excellent

About orange808

  • Rank
    Chopper Commander

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male

Recent Profile Visitors

3,292 profile views
  1. Well, that turned sour fast. Okay. Let's talk turkey! There's plenty of options from multiple sources that can sample analog video (optionally convert color space) and put it on an HDMI plug with less than a frame of latency. The easiest options are a RetroTink or the OSSC. Furthermore, if you're concerned about lag, what in the world gave you the idea that the video processing in your television would convert analog video quickly? Why would it do that? Samsung, LG, and Sony don't care about your Atari. Most televisions have painfully slow and awful OEM video scaling. It gets even slower because many televisions will assume everything is broadcast NTSC or PAL and apply deinterlacing to the progressive Atari 7800 output--wasting even more time and damaging the signal in the process! Plugging directly into your television with any analog signal is lazy and asking for trouble. So, your output is a function of your effort.
  2. No worries. You can safely buy a new display based solely on the quality of the display itself. No need to worry about the ports. There are plenty of external options to get analog into the digital domain and onto an HDMI plug.
  3. TLDR; get an old VCR. It doesn't have to play tapes at all. The "analog tuner" inside the VCR will handle converting the RF signal from your 7800 to composite video. The tuners in most modern VCRs were pretty good and you'll get decent composite output. If you want better quality, you need some kind of mod. Don't bother with trying to find a "better converter" to magically make RF look good. Don't bother getting a VCR with "svideo" out, because your display will probably handle converting the composite video better than the ancient technology in an old VCR. Don't get a DVD recorder, because those have processing delay and your inputs won't register fast enough. Don't buy an expensive model of VCR. Everyone used the tuners in their VCRs and all the big brands shipped a reasonably good tuner in their inexpensive VCRs. Get a Sony or something. If you're hooking the composite output to a modern television and it won't accept the signal, you may consider adding a Koryuu. VGP sells those and they work quite well.
  4. There's no easy way, but it's possible. Looks like the pointers the bB DPC+ kernel uses are PF1L, PF2L, PF1R, PF2R, and PFCOLS. You need in line assembler to do this.
  5. Yeah, I was thinking about trying it as 480i. I've owned lots of Extron, gear but I've never particularly liked the deinterlacing results with any of their machines. Although, it's not necessarily worse that what you'll get from most televisions or lots of other video gear. Deinterlacing is such a pain. Anyhow, I would suggest (maybe) using a scan converter (that can accept 240p) in the chain (to get proper 480i) before the display or an external deinterlacer. Another possibility might be to try DVDO PReP.
  6. No luck finding a video processor to handle this for you. I looked at a couple possibilities (DVDO iScan HD+ and Calibre HQV320) that improperly apply 480i deinterlacing on 240p signals, but no luck suppressing the flicker. They may not have worked because they do minimal damage to 240p. Anyhow, best of luck to you. I'm certain I have a video chain that could get rid of the flicker, but the latency would be ridiculous.
  7. There are multiple current and upcoming games that also use this effect. So, you'll also want to be careful and stick to legacy and older software. I have an idea about a video processor that might fit this use case, but I'll have to look at it later. Although, you would probably need to really really love the display and the Atari to buy a video processor just to play Atari on it.
  8. When new games are coming out with fresh cart enhancements under the hood, it's a sign. It means: the platform is alive. Still alive and still kicking after all these years. I'm not ready for the Atari VCS to permanently downshift into legacy mode just yet. One standard feels like a victory lap farewell tour singing the greatest hits.
  9. OP should also consider that not all new games will target your flash cart as a freely distributed download. If you really enjoy new titles, you should support the devs and buy the games. A flash cart isn't necessarily a ticket to free new games. All you really need is a flash cart that plays legacy software.
  10. Thank you. I was going to drop my project if my code was copyleft. I inquired about the Pluscart design as a possiblity for manufacturing carts as well. A board with RTC battery backup would allow me to drop the password game restore feature. I know I could also use one of the "lower" sectors (currently occupied with firmware), but I have no desire to flash the cart while making test builds. It's impractical. I understand the Pluscart board gerbers are available under GPL and I haven't sorted out rather or not that's a deal breaker. The board only carries signals to and from the VCS and the STM32, so it might be okay. Although, I'm immediately concerned that GPL licencing is fundamentally incompatible with using an STM32 board, because I don't believe the entire hardware design (STM32 gerbers etc) are available to open source the entire hardware project and meet the terms of GPL.
  11. Can you share some details about the open source licensing terms for using ACE and Unocart?
  12. Yes. NTSC. It's the first two characters and the first column of the third character that have artifacts. So, it might still be a reliable interlaced 33 chars kernel with a small blank space on the left. :)
  13. That reminds me. On my hardware using that 36 char interlaced kernel: On my 2600 four switch woody, the first two chars have artifacts consistently on both Harmony and Unocart. On the 7800, it works properly intermittently, but never consistently.
  14. You might contact Jordan Mechner for permission first. After reading his impressions of other ports of the game, I imagine the bar will be set high. There's also a chance that something else could arrive later and sap your enthusiasm.
  15. I can't love a big project without hating it.  :)

     

    1. joeatari1

      joeatari1

      But when you finish it, you get that big sense of accomplishment.  You can then pat yourself on the back for a job well done and have a cold one.  At that point, the hating it part doesn't matter anymore.

×
×
  • Create New...