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sirlynxalot

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About sirlynxalot

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  1. Nice job on the controller, the 3 button genesis pad is a fantastic controller and it looks nice with the GG graphics.
  2. I could be wrong but I think some download manager programs like jdownloader have the option to download everything linked on a particular web page without having to click every link individually.
  3. Just throwing out my opinion. I don't think the majority of people who donate to my local thrift stores do it because they want to donate to charity. I think it is mostly done out of convenience for the donator, such as when the donator wants to clean out their home for a spring cleaning, or a relative passes away, or they are moving, etc and it is easier to take a car load of small presumed low value used stuff to the thrift store than to do a yard sale, craigslist, or throw it away in the small home trash bin. In my experience of going to goodwills and salvation armies and noticing the customers and what they are buying, I don't think the main customer base is collectors, I think it's low income families looking for cheap clothes, furniture and household items. I don't think barcode scanners buying all the rare books, video games, records and small electronics and driving away the casual treasure hunters makes a big dent in the customer base. There are places that are for profit entertainment exchanges. One I know if is a chain of stores called Bookmans in Arizona, which buys and sells used books, games, records, electronics, action figures, comics etc., basically all the cool/vintage stuff you'd want to find at a thrift store or yard sale. Usually the prices are closer to ebay level but you might find deals here and there. If a barcode scanner were doing their thing at this kind of place and driving away customers, I agree that would erode the customer base and be bad for business.
  4. I agree it kills my motivation to check out these places as a casual treasure seeker/collector, but for thrift stores like goodwill or salvation army, I don't think it makes a lot of difference at the end of the day that the casual collector customers are put off from going. My thought is that instead of having 30 casual collector customers buying 30 items of "the good stuff" in a week, they'll have 3 barcode scanner guys loading up and buying 30 items of "the good stuff" for their resale business each week instead. At the end of the day it doesn't matter to the thrift store because they get the same amount of cash either way.
  5. For me, if its not playing on an actual lynx, its emulation. And I feel no need to have a pocket emulator or ready made emulation device over the free PC emulators (afterall, I don't really play lynx on the go these days). In that regard, I'm interested in keeping my lynx going as long as possible within a reasonable cost, but even now, I find myself more often than not just playing some lynx on the PC with a game controller than digging my lynx unit out.
  6. You should advertise this on the obscuregamers.com forums. Lots of people very interested in console game prototypes there.
  7. I get the ill will toward the scanner people because they are presumably mining out the cool and/or interesting stuff and we can't get the same thrill of the hunt when looking through ourselves that we used to get decades ago. On the other hand, if its a charity or donation shop, generally their purpose is to sell these used items to raise money for charity, or to sell used items at a low cost to directly help people who don't have a lot of money, so the only care they have is that something is sold, it doesn't matter if its sold to a collector who wants to flip it for resale, or a collector who is hunting for items to keep, or if its sold to a poor person who wants to just own or use the item as it is. I agree, it takes a bit of the fun out of things if you are looking over items that are very picked over. However, on the other hand, this is equating "fun items" with "expensive items". Presumably the scanner resellers are leaving everything they cannot make a good enough markup on - there should still be some interesting cheap stuff left over which could be of interest to someone who wants to buy for themselves as opposed to reselling, right? Of course, I've also heard of people that will have a special arrangement with a donation/thrift store that they will buy ANY video game stuff that comes in, so that stuff never even makes it to the shelf to be seen by others, also people that will hound a family doing a yardsale to let them look over stuff before the yardsale even opens. I think those arrangements are kind of lame
  8. Was just thinking about these hardware prototypes the other day. Has any more information or pictures come to light about these? Very curious how the control-wheel / dpad would have worked.
  9. Ah, I'd heard Epyx was dependent on Atari for financial support at the time of the lynx and became a "captive" of sorts. I figured this meant Epyx might have become a subsidiary of Atari, but I guess it was all a contractual relationship for services and hardware rather than atari acquiring ownership of the Epyx company. It seems Epyx filed for bankruptcy in 1989, the remaining employees decided to sell the company's assets in 1993 and Bridgestone Media Group acquired some of these assets offered for sale. I guess the Epyx lynx stuff could have been part of the asset sale.
  10. Cool, nice to see lynx titles getting some potential exposure outside of the existing lynx fanbase. Who owns the rights to the Epyx titles like Zarlor Mercenary and Chip's Challenge? Since Epyx was acquired by Atari at the time, I figured that stuff would have gone to JTS and/or Hasbro and be who knows where at this point.
  11. I was born in the mid 80s so I was only old enough to go to arcades in the 90s. As far as places that were dedicated arcades, usually the lighting would be intentionally dim, there would be a mix of games but my eye was always drawn to any cabs that were deluxe or super deluxe models over the typical arcade cabinet shape. Chances were that the large deluxe stuff would be a pretty cool experience with special controllers and/or cutting edge graphics - stuff like Alpine Racer 1 + 2 and Top Skater. I put some quarters into Tekken 2 when I first saw it simply because it was hooked up to a large projection TV like monitor and the controls were on a pedestal, so it seemed larger than life and very important (the graphics were also pretty good for the time). Of course many of these deluxe games sometimes cost a full dollar to play, which as strange as it seems, made them even more special b/c you couldn't waste quarters replaying them and make yourself tired of the limited levels in the games. Although I was young, I was at an arcade around 1993/1994 when Virtua Fighter and Primal Rage were new. Those seemed like such grownup games, there was a big crowd around each of them of teenagers, who were basically adults to me at the time. It lent an adult serious aura to those games. Also played Stun Runner and Race Drivin in the early 90s. I wasted quarters not understanding how to get the car to move in Race Drivin (forget if it was due to not knowing you need to turn the ignition, or use the clutch to shift the shifter into drive), the entire timer counted down while my car stayed still and I watched helplessly! I watched the sega 3D racers enter the arcade - stuff like Daytona USA, SCUD Race and Daytona USA 2. The graphics were phenomenal on these and made a huge positive impression on me. The first few Cruis'n games were lots of fun and easy to have fun with as well. Aside from the deluxe stuff, there was a 4P cab for capcom's Dungeons and Dragons beat em up at my local arcade. When I first saw it, it also seemed really important with its extra wide control panel and its light story and character stat elements. I roped in some friends of mine to spend some money on the game, we probably got 10-15% of the way through it before we all decided not to keep plugging quarters into it. A neat experience.
  12. Interesting. I was kinda wondering if the Atari "family entertainment centers" token might be a different kind of establishment to the adventure centers in light of the fact that there is another type of atari token that specifically says adventure on it.
  13. I've seen atari arcade tokens on ebay with the atari logo. Did atari have a chain of arcades similar to how Namco and Sega had their own sponsored arcades? Googling is giving me surprisingly little information on this.
  14. Really nice level graphics and parallax effects!
  15. I really like the look of the background graphics. Great 2D art by the artist!
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