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gfreige

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About gfreige

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    Star Raider

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    La Plata, Argentina
  1. Hi. Regarding natural keyboard, I've found a bug. Natural keyboard doesn´t work with geneve emulation (at least in a mac) and the GUI correctly gray the option, but if you used natural keyboard during a ti/99 emulation and then switch to geneve, the guI still sends the -natural option in the command line, and the keyboard does´t work.
  2. I used one of these!!!! With a TI RS232 sidecar!! They were rebadged Epson MX-80 with the RS232 interface included. Lately I've reprogrammed the eproms with the ones from an "IBM PC Printer" (another rebadged MX-80 sold by IBM with the IBM PC with a different eprom and the IBM extended ascii set) and used it with an XT until I sold the whole thing. The printer was replaced with an EPSON FX-1050 that it's still working here
  3. Isn't rasmus writing a SAMS game? I've read some time ago Rasmus was writing a game and storing all the level data in SAMS I can't remember the game name. Cheers
  4. Wonderful!! ENIAC Emulator!! Now we need a Colossus and a Univac one
  5. Of course, as usual, you are right. I've mixed the 28A and 29A, misunderstanding the whole point of the question
  6. Hi, I've connected my PAL TI99 to a multitude of displays using the YPbPr output with a custom made cable. You don't need to modify anything in the console. Most displays worked fine, except for a TCL 46" LCD display (UNSUPPORTED in the screen) when used YPbPr, but working fine with only the Y signal via Composite input, in B&W. Despite working in both Sonys I've tried, a DELL monitor with YPbPr input and a Panasonic plasma (it's actual display) voltages aren't standard. The blue signal is too high so all colors have a bluish tint. I was able to correct it in the DELL using a custom color setting, but in the other displays colors were too cold. Of course your display needs support for PAL signals. This is the pinout of the PAL TI. Just connect Y to Green, Pr to Red, Pb to Blue (try some resistor to lower Blue channel signal if you want), Audio to Left and Right audio channels, and all grounds to Ground. Also, if you tweak an US TI win the 9928A, you'll end with a PAL, 50Hz console. The opposite is true with a PAL TI with a F18A, it'll run at 60Hz. The VDP commands the hertz rate. not the console. Regarding scanlines, if you use an old 640x480 VGA monitor (CRT of course) with the F18A you'll have the same (or very similar) scalines than a NTSC display (both have 480 lines at 60 Hz)
  7. Yes, exFAT is licensed. That's why I've said it's incompatible with Linux. Regarding FAT32, it has a 4Gb limitation, so even taking account of the 2GB bug in root directories, a 5Gb file will never be copied to a FAT32 filesystem, even in a subdirectory. exFAT works in macOS because Apple licensed it from Microsoft. I've used it in my common data drives when I had a Hackintosh using dual boot with Windows 7 and Lion.
  8. For larger than 4Gb files you need ExFAT or NTFS in Windows. ExFAT is compatible with MacOS in RW but not with Linux. NTFS works with both but in RO (at least in MacOS by default).
  9. You can do that right now, with a smartphone. It's exactly what I do with the TI and a C64 (using a line-out to cassette adapter in the C64 case)
  10. check this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/1m-5-Pin-Male-Din-Plug-to-2-x-RCA-Phono-male-Plugs-Audio-Cable-007350-/262789954413 It uses 3+5 (said in the description) and you can connect it directly to an RCA input.
  11. Probably yes. If it uses the standard EU audio pins, 2 is ground, and 3/5 are left/right output channels (and 1/4 are the input ones in a tape interface), so in the TI case, in pin 5 you'll have no signal and in pin 3 you'll have audio.
  12. Yes, as you can see in the graph I attached, TI (NTSC) C64 and Atari 800 can use the same DIN-5 cable for AV (composite) connection.
  13. The TI-PC was a very popular PC clone here, and in fact both the floppy disk access and the video (similar to EGA) blow the IBM out of the water. I used it with compiled basic programs and when finally used the same program in a IBM PC it took AGES to read and write the same info from a diskette compared to the Ti-PC (not to mention the screen was monochromatic)
  14. Just the inital of my first name and my last name. Seems to be a rather unique combination as I used it everywhere without any nickname clash for many years
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