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atarikid1968

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atarikid1968 last won the day on September 30 2017

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About atarikid1968

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  1. Tempest, there isn't "two" one of a kind prototypes for the 400. What Curt was talking about is that Doug also had the first "Stella" (2600 of course) in his possession. He had the 2600 and 400 but unfortunately Doug believed in a video store owner and let him borrow it as a display and never received it back. I'm currently trying to track down the store owner to see if I can retrieve it. I'm so blown away with the knowledge and passion of everyone on here and I'm just disappointed that I didn't know about this before Doug passed away; he would have loved this site. I'd still like to upload some of Doug's audio recordings talking about how and why they designed things the way they did. Plus his description of how things were done at Atari is just the best.
  2. ClausB here is a HDR picture of the motherboard. Sorry but I'm not the best photographer. I can try to take better pictures at a point where I have some more time.
  3. Thanks Curt for explaining this to everyone. As for the question about any other pieces, the pictures are showing everything that is there. What I'm trying to do is of course share what Doug had helped create and most importantly help get Doug Hardy's name out there. Doug was very instrumental in the design work on these machines as well as designing the cartridge itself (hence his name being on the patent). I will work with Curt to put something together about the 400 itself as well as Doug. I'd like to share some of the stories as well about Atari on here straight from Doug's mouth and look forward to that as well. Thanks.
  4. The pictures were taken one at a time as I removed the pieces just like they made it to be put together and taken apart. It's pretty cool to see the work they put into it and how they were making it all fit from all aspects.
  5. Hi there, I have the pictures to post on here just don't know which is the best way. When I click on images it asks me for a URL. Is there a way to just upload images to this forum?
  6. When he came up with the design they had built a machine that would input and remove a cartridge 1 million times and the very first prototype cartridge passed the test the very first time. I will reach out to Kevin for sure. I will also post some pictures of Candy tomorrow when I have a chance.
  7. Thanks for both suggestions. I just did a search on Kevin and will look to try and reach out. As for the audio and video files, yes they are already digitized and will look to organize them and post what I can. His stories were amazing and how they designed things in right frame of mind (if you get what I mean) just blows me away. Thanks!
  8. I'm new to these forums and just replied all of this in another forum but thought to get best results that maybe I would start my own thread. Here is what I wrote in the other thread. Thanks. I was wondering if anyone here might be able to help me. Bill Loguidice suggested I write something here in the Atariage forums for some help. My good Friend Doug Hardy who was one of the engineers who helped design the 2600, 400 and 800 just recently passed. When I say design, I mean the casings/consoles, cartridges and how everything went together. His name is on several Atari patents including the cartridge. He was part of the team at Fairchild and engineered the cartridge there and literally the day he finished and the prototype was done he walked out the door and went to Atari. He gave me what he said is the very first "Candy" as he called her still. This Atari 400 according to him was the first prototype they put together after they finished with all engineering and had all the parts. You can tell by the way it's able to be taken apart and the fact that there is no serial number plate on it that it's a prototype. It does have a handwritten number on the inside of the machine itself. All pieces are still there including of course the electronics. Doug always told me that this machine was something special and so I want to see if there is anyone I can talk to about it. If anyone wants to send me a message or contact me I would love to find out more. By the way, I have him on audio talking all about how he ultimately came up with the design for the cartridge and how it wouldn't wear out plus stories of the 2600, 400 and 800. I'd love to see how I can put that on here somewhere so people can hear his story. I also have some really good stories from him on audio/video talking about the atmosphere at Atari (yes it was some crazy times) and how corrupt it became once Warner took it over. Any help would be appreciated. Dennis
  9. I was wondering if anyone here might be able to help me. Bill Loguidice suggested I write something here in the Atariage forums for some help. My good Friend Doug Hardy who was one of the engineers who helped design the 2600, 400 and 800 just recently passed. When I say design, I mean the casings/consoles, cartridges and how everything went together. His name is on several Atari patents including the cartridge. He was part of the team at Fairchild and engineered the cartridge there and literally the day he finished and the prototype was done he walked out the door and went to Atari. He gave me what he said is the very first "Candy" as he called her still. This Atari 400 according to him was the first prototype they put together after they finished with all engineering and had all the parts. You can tell by the way it's able to be taken apart and the fact that there is no serial number plate on it that it's a prototype. It does have a handwritten number on the inside of the machine itself. All pieces are still there including of course the electronics. Doug always told me that this machine was something special and so I want to see if there is anyone I can talk to about it. If anyone wants to send me a message or contact me I would love to find out more. By the way, I have him on audio talking all about how he ultimately came up with the design for the cartridge and how it wouldn't wear out plus stories of the 2600, 400 and 800. I'd love to see how I can put that on here somewhere so people can hear his story. I also have some really good stories from him on audio/video talking about the atmosphere at Atari (yes it was some crazy times) and how corrupt it became once Warner took it over. Any help would be appreciated. Dennis
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