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Jfrik84

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About Jfrik84

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  1. Also a good resource to remember. Thank you. I tend to work on arcades kind of infrequently and I don't do Facebook. I'm to a point where I have enough arcades now that I really need to learn how to fix them when an issue comes up. Learning should be easy as I do have a mechanical background. I picked up a broken MAME cocktail cab years ago at an auction and it's been sitting ever since and now I'm kicking myself for finally realizing how simple it seems to replace the destroyed PC inside. Just had to do the research! Definitely going to check out your website. Thanks again!
  2. Thanks for all of the info! I thought that amp might be a little much for such a simple cabinet. Building an amplifier actually looks pretty fun. I seem to find myself buried in projects so I might buy one depending on how soon I'm looking to get this project completed, but I'm definitely going to keep that info in mind. I'd like to learn how to make any repair I need to on these cabinets to keep them running. Thanks again for all of the helpful information. I can say your screen name is accurate!
  3. That is actually very excellent news as adding an amplifier is far less intimidating to me than making repairs to a PCB. I will track one down! The guy I bought this unit from bought out an arcade business years ago and I'm supposed to go back this week to look at some more arcades he is going to dig out of storage so I might be able to find one there with a little luck. I'm also building a MAME cocktail cabinet right now and may have a leftover amp from that rebuild when I'm done. It's a Lepy LP 838 if you think that would work.
  4. That sure would be nice if it could be adjusted on the PCB, but I'm just not seeing any kind of adjustment for that anywhere. I tried switching speaker - to pin 11, but that didn't seem to make any change as far as volume goes. It did still have sound after making that change though. You are most likely right that it could be a bad/ old cap. That has always been something a little beyond my skill, but something I've wanted to learn so maybe I can practice with this one a little. Thanks again for the help and suggestions!
  5. Thank you! After reading that, I found that someone had already soldered a pigtail to the bottom of pin 10. I made the connections and it worked! It's very quiet, but with this information, installing an amplifier should be straightforward now. I appreciate the guidance!
  6. I recently purchased a Mr.Do! Dedicated Cocktail table and found the only mechanical issue is that the sound doesn't work. After some luck picking the locks, I found the speaker wires had been cut very short with no obvious place in sight that they should be connected. My best guess is that this wasn't originally a Mr. Do! since the table has Taito printed on the sides and glass and I suspect when they switched it over, they didn't install a sound board as I don't clearly see one anywhere. This is all speculation since information on this table seems very limited online. I am hoping someone might be able to help me figure out where the speaker wires should be connected. Maybe someone has a diagram or more information than what I'm finding online. Any help to get this unit 100% functional is much appreciated!
  7. Thank you. It looked a lot worse than it actually was. It didn't take very much time and the biggest expense was the replacement acrylic for the doors. Good luck! I hope you find one!
  8. That would be amazing if you do. Sounds great! Thanks!
  9. Thanks! I did add some updated photos of the completed project, but I'm not sure what happened to them on here. Below are some photos of my completed project. Thank you to those that helped fill in some information. I am still going to be on the lookout for an original advertisement to mount in the right side acrylic although the poster size is slightly larger than the typical Atari poster I have seen at approximately 20" X 30" so the 'reach for the stars' poster also seems to be somewhat rare from what I've found. I did replace the acrylic doors on the front of the cabinet due to them being scratched and damaged beyond repair, but other than that, the cabinet is all original. A little degreaser cleaned up the filthy surfaces and a little black paint for touch ups on the base and inside the cabinet. The biggest challenge was reconnecting the right side panel that came loose from being hit by a car (that's what I was told). I also used some very fine sandpaper to clean up the brushed look of the aluminum channel and the plates on the doors that help secure the doors. I do have two extra shelves that are not in place right now. This was a fun project and I'm happy to bring it new life. My plan for the cabinet is to display any original boxed Atari items I can gather and keep it looking like a retail display. I am more than happy to share and help out with info if anyone is working on a similar project and have any questions. Photo after refurbishing Photo after refurbishing Photo after refurbishing. Photo after refurbishing Photo after refurbishing
  10. Thank you and good luck! I didn't expect it at all so if it can happen to me, it can happen to you. I just posted some pictures of it after the restoration. It came very clean and looks almost new again.
  11. Below are some photos of my completed project. Thank you to those that helped fill in some information. I am still going to be on the lookout for an original advertisement to mount in the right side acrylic although the poster size is slightly larger than the typical Atari post I have seen at approximately 20" X 30" so the 'reach for the stars' poster also seems to be somewhat rare from what I've found. I did replace the acrylic doors on the front of the cabinet due to them being scratched and damaged beyond repair, but other than that, the cabinet is all original. A little degreaser cleaned up the filthy surfaces and a little black paint for touch ups on the base and inside the cabinet. The biggest challenge was reconnecting the right side panel that came loose from being hit by a car (that's what I was told). I also used some very fine sandpaper to clean up the brushed look of the aluminum channel and the plates on the doors that help secure the doors. I do have two extra shelves that are not in place right now. This was a fun project and I'm happy to bring it new life. My plan for the cabinet is to display any original boxed Atari items I can gather and keep it looking like a retail display. I am more than happy to share and help out with info if anyone is working on a similar project and have any questions. Photo after refurbishing Photo after refurbishing Photo after refurbishing. Photo after refurbishing Photo after refurbishing
  12. Wow, that really does look like it. I wonder if they had different incarnations of this cabinet. The one I found has plexiglas doors on it and the hinges for the doors look original to the cabinet and definitely not something that had been added later on. I wish the one I found was set up like that, but I'm not going to complain. One thing I will note is there is about 6 or 7 inches of dead space behind the rear panel inside the cabinet to the back of the cabinet so maybe that was for models that required extra space to hide the wiring.
  13. Luck was really on my side with this one. Since he knew it needed some work, he only wanted $20 for it.
  14. Looks good! That's a sweet set up!
  15. The cabinet was being used in the person's garage as a storage shelf so I don't think it wasn't really a valued item for them. I think it came from California originally, so they were probably 49er fans.
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