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Savetz

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Savetz last won the day on December 7 2017

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About Savetz

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    Male
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    Portland OR
  • Interests
    preserving Atari publications at AtariMagazines.com, AtariArchives.org, and Archive.org. Co-host of ANTIC the Atari 8-Bit Podcast.

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  1. >May we expect an interview? Yes. It's already done, actually, just waiting on some things before I publish it. -Kevin
  2. I don't know how nor have the equipment. Perhaps I can lend the card to someone to do the work. -Kevin
  3. I found the LC Williams disk in the Neanderthal binder, but it was not an official-looking label. Maybe just someone's project that was not really part of the upgrade. -Kevin
  4. More info in an email from the programmer, James Hugard: "To help reverse engineer the hardware: Pretty sure we used a WD2791, mainly because it needed fewer external components (had an internal phased-locked-loop data separator) and used a 1MHz clock. I was originally going to use an FD1781, but the WD sales rep convinced me the newer chip would be a better choice. Nice guy. He ended up moving to a company that was also trying to produce a double-density for the Atari, but they were manufacturing the whole drive. Can’t recall if they ever shipped, though. Also, the PROM was 2K (not 4K like I said in the interview), but we did add 4K of RAM to replace the original 128 bytes. I was sure I could fit the firmware in 2K and wanted 4K to buffer a whole track. Later I added a download command, so I could upload code to the drive at runtime (like the disc copy firmware). Have a story about getting the code down to 2K, lol. IIRC, we also needed to either stabilize the clock or bump it to 1MHz. My memory on versions is a bit fuzzy, but I *think* v1.0 firmware was just double density, v1.1 added upload for disc copy, and v1.2 added 56 kbs transfer rate (over the stock 19.2 kbs)."
  5. I just talked to the programmer. Only 300 of the device were made. -Kevin
  6. In case anyone is still following this old thread, here's some new info about Neanderthal Computer Things 810 Turbo: http://atariage.com/forums/topic/291937-neanderthal-computer-things-810-turbo/ -Kevin
  7. In case anyone is still following this old thread, here's some new info about Neanderthal Computer Things 810 Turbo: http://atariage.com/forums/topic/291937-neanderthal-computer-things-810-turbo/ -Kevin
  8. I acquired a complete-in-box "810 Turbo" device by Neanderthal Computer Things about a year ago, and finally got around to scanning the manual and imaging the disks. I didn't realize at first that this is a pretty rare beast. According to the flyer, it adds true double density, faster reads/writes, and "backup" capabilities to the Atari 810 drive. I have found a handful of references to it here in the forums, but never a picture or software or manual — until now. Check out my photos of the board — looks like they opted for security through obscurity by scratching off the info about all of the chips. This seems to be the only product this company made. Take a look around and let me know if you learn anything interesting. Manual Pictures of the board and images of the floppies (ATR files also attached) Neanderthal Computer Things 810 Turbo 810T Utilities.atr Neanderthal Computer Things 810 Turbo NDOS Generator.atr Neanderthal Computer Things 810 Turbo OS A+ V21S.atr Neanderthal Computer Things 810 Turbo OS A+ V41D.atr Neanderthal Computer Things LC Williams side A.atr Neanderthal Computer Things LC Williams side B.atr -Kevin
  9. John Anderson: Rally Speedway and Arex http://ataripodcast.libsyn.com/antic-interview-371-john-anderson-rally-speedway-and-arex John Anderson worked at Adventure International, where he coded several games: Eliminator, Rear Guard, and Sea Dragon for the Apple II, then Rally Speedway and Arex for the Atari 8-bits. This interview took place on May 22, 2019. In it, we discuss Scott Adams and Russ Wetmore, both of whom I have previously interviewed. ANTIC Interview 371 - John Anderson: Rally Speedway and Arex Video version of this interview
  10. Roy Goldman sent me the source code for Daisy Dot II, and also the complete registered version of Daisy Dot III (which I don't think was online before.) I have uploaded these to Internet Archive and now, here! and this manual https://archive.org/details/DaisyDotIIIUsersGuide/ ... he also sent a couple more manuals that still need to be scanned. --Kevin Daisy Dot II Source Code.atr Daisy Dot III Disk 1 Side A.atr Daisy Dot III Disk 1 Side B.atr Daisy Dot III Disk 2 Side A.atr Daisy Dot III Disk 2 Side B.atr
  11. Savetz

    AVGCart

    I'd like 2 please. -Kevin
  12. The picture was run from one of the disks directly, not from a dump. It took about 7 seconds for the whole picture to display. -Kevin
  13. This loading screen was as far as we could get at VCF East. Look at the cool graphics in XEP-80 mode! -Kevin
  14. Roy Goldman, Daisy-Dot Roy Goldman was the creator of Daisy-Dot, a typesetting program for the Atari 8-bit computers which he published from about 1987-1990. There were three versions of Daisy-Dot, the original plus Daisy-Dot II and Daisy-Dot III. The earliest version was freeware, and later versions asked for payment for access to special features. This interview took place on May 11, 2019. After we talked, Roy sent me scans of memorabilia from that time. http://ataripodcast.libsyn.com/antic-interview-370-roy-goldman-daisy-dot
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