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Found 84 results

  1. Kingdom Rush is one of my new favorites when it comes to great gameplay, and amazing tower defense style. I personally love this game with its movie references and cool up gradable towers. I f you want to play this marvel go to the link: http://armorgames.com/play/12141/kingdom-rush The game is a flash game and an app for the iPad currently by IronHide Games (wish it was free), hope they get to route the app to other tablets and smart phones. CGR did a great review on this game. Hope you enjoy playing the game. It's greatly addictive!
  2. MAME 0.201 It’s the end of another month, and time for your scheduled MAME release, with more of everything we know you love. In a last-minute update, we slipped in a major performance for bgfx video output. It’s particularly noticeable when using cropped artwork, and there’s no longer a big performance penalty for bringing up the menu over the emulation on macOS. Another core improvement is support for TAP/TUN networking on Windows, providing a big performance improvement when connecting an emulated system to a network on the host machine. From the department of things considered lost to time, MAME 0.201 allows you to play as Chuby the octopus, in the incredibly elusive Spanish game Night Mare. Unfortunately the sound ROMs were missing, so you won’t be able to hear Chuby speak, and we still need to be on the lookout for the export version known as Clean Octopus. And speaking of rare games from Spain, two more Magnet System titles have been dumped: A Day in Space and The Burning Cavern. Newly dumped versions of supported arcade games include prototypes of Halley’s Comet (Taito) and Dog Fight (Orca), a newer version of the original Master Boy (Gaelco), and the Korean release of Raiden II (Seibu Kaihatsu). A redumped ROM allowed Psychic Force EX to run correctly. The vgmplay logged music player has had a big update in this release, with support for several more sound chips and a comprehensive software list. And this brings us to audio improvements, which seem to have all crowded their way into this release. We have fixes for long-standing sound bugs in Twin Eagle, Targ and Spectar. Sound in Amazing Maze is no longer cut off after thirty seconds or so. There are some big changes for QSound and Taito Zoom ZSG-2 that should make things sound nicer. There’s also preliminary support for the NEC PC-FX’s HuC6230 SoundBox, but be aware it has a DC offset so you’ll hear a big thud when you start or stop it. Recent improvements in NEC PC-98 emulation have seen dozens of titles promoted to working status, and we’ve added another batch of dumps from Neo Kobe Collection. There are a number of fixes that improve TI-99 floppy and cassette support in this release. InterPro systems can now be used via a serial terminal in configurations without a video card or keyboard. At long last, the Apple //c Plus can boot from its internal floppy drive. Other improvements to computer emulation include better keyboard support for Amiga systems, and improved GPU emulation for the HP Integral PC. Of course, you can get source and Windows binaries from the download page.
  3. MAME 0.205 With Christmas just over, it’s time for the final MAME release for 2018, and what a year it’s been! Before we move on, let’s pause and recap some of the significant milestones from the past twelve months: We’ve emulated a steady stream of hand-held games from Nintendo, Tiger and others. Our Tiger Game.com emulation now runs all released games. Acorn computer emulation improvements have been too numerous to count. In particular, MAME now supports a huge array of peripherals. Emulation for home systems based on the SSD XaviX, SunPlus µ'nSP and V.R. Technology VT platforms has really advanced, bringing a generation of TV games to life. MAME now runs CLIX on InterPro and HP-UX on HP9000/300, both with graphical desktop environments and networking. MAME will also run SunOS with the SunView desktop environment on some SPARC workstations. Additionally, the SGI Iris Indigo R4000 shows its boot menu. Long-standing graphical issues have been fixed, including priorities in Pac-Land and Moon Patrol, row scroll effects on Capcom CPS-3, and numerous glaring errors on Tatsumi games. Hit detection on the now-infamous helicopter in Time Crisis has been corrected, rear-view mirrors work in Ridge Racer 2, Rave Racer and Ace Driver, track mirroring works in Rave Racer, and graphics have been improved across all Namco System 22 games. Taito C-Chip emulation finally allows Bonze Adventure to play as intended, solving all the persistent gameplay issues. Games with Capcom QSound and Taito Zoom ZSG-2 hardware now provide a far more enjoyable auditory experience. Rare arcade systems keep getting dumped and emulated, including Tom Tom Magic, the original Gigas Mark II, Last KM, Night Mare, El Fin Del Tiempo, a prototype of Led Storm Rally 2011, and the Pac-Man hack Titan. Some of these were thought to be lost to time. MAME 0.205 is no different. Newly supported arcade systems include Unico’s Magic Purple, and Visco’s never-before-seen prototype Pastel Island. The latter ties in nicely with improved video emulation for the SSV platform (yes, this fixes other long-standing glitches, too). Newly playable machines include Konami’s Tobe! Polystars, Evil Night and Total Vice. Yes, Konami M2 emulation is finally here! Be aware that there’s still a lot of room for performance optimisation on this system. Putting arcade systems aside for a moment, this release includes support for Dance Dance Revolution Strawberry Shortcake, and the Nintendo Game & Watch titles Oil Panic and Squish. Interestingly, there are no other emulators or simulators for Squish, and it hasn’t been included in any of Nintendo’s Game & Watch collections. It seems to draw inspiration from the Famicom game Devil World. There are hundreds more Commodore 64 cassettes in the software list now, and quite a few more BBC ROMs as well. Software lists have been added for the Nascom computers, along with updates to the boot ROM choices and better keyboard emulation. We’ve also created a skeleton driver and documented the known software for the Chinese Monon Color console. In a last-minute addition we added support for new version 2 .WOZ floppy images on the Apple II family. Of course, there are lots more additions and improvements that you can read about in the whatsnew.txt file, or you can get the source and Windows binary packages from the download page and try it out yourself. Enjoy the rest of the year, and all the best in 2019 from all of us at MAMEdev!
  4. Hi everyone! I haven't posted here in ages, but am doing some more paring down of my collection. Lots of rare games, vintage computer stuff, and related collectibles. Let my temporary insanity be your gain! Link to all items: http://www.ebay.com/sch/joesm00th/m.html The particularly cool things: Atari 2600 AtariAge HOLIDAY GREETING CART 2003, #10 of 10 Atari 2600 MARBLE CRAZE by Paul Slocum, CGE 2002 release in tin box tin Atari 2600 QB Special Edition by Andrew Davie, 2002, #98 of 100 release in wooden box ColecoVision KEVTRIS by Kevin Horton, 1996, #56 of 100, First CV homebrew! Atari 8-bit Castle Wolfenstein disk w/ manual Atari 8-bit Fort Apocalypse disk w/ manual Atari 8-bit Bruce Lee disk w/ manual Atari FLASHBACK 2 w/ cartridge port hack + A/V jacks Atari 400 CIB w/ styrofoam Atari 130XE system modified with switches (for debugging?) Enjoy! Joe
  5. Recently (May 2015), my Aunt, who is a Realtor, was selling a house for someone, the previous owner moved out and wanted to sell it, well, they left a ton of stuff, so my aunt tasked me with cleanup, in exchange for all the contents. one of the things was a Commodore SX-64 Executive Computer, a Commodore 1541 Floppy Drive, and a Commodore MP-48 Printer. I went to boot the Commodore, and Nothing Happened. the light was on, and i could see that the screen was on, but it was just a black screen. Any ideas?
  6. Looking for the following cartridges to add to my collection: Androne Demon Attack Don Pan Dragonfire Math Tutor Mindroll (Coco 3 Version) Rampage Shanghai Thanks
  7. When assembling, there are several different screen enhancements that could use to make the experience more enjoyable. One way is to change the background and foreground colors. This is the shot from the previous installment: By pressing a certain key (or key combo) on the keyboard, it will bring up a screen saying what color you want to use. That screen might look something like this: As indicated on the screen, press 0-9 or A-F to choose the appropriate color. When you press one of these buttons, the color beside the "current" heading changes to the selected color. For example, if you press "3," while in the palette shown above, you will choose purple. You can also toggle between foreground/background color choice by pressing the "/" key. To change palettes, press up/down. There are seven different palettes, plus one palette you can customize. The chart below shows the seven fixed palettes: Each row is one palette, and each palette has a different theme. They are based on palettes from older gaming and computer systems. Palette 0 - Apple ][ Palette 1 - Commodore 64 Palette 2 - Mattel Aquarius Palette 3 - Commodore VIC-20 Palette 4 - MSX Palette 5 - CGA Palette 6 - ZX Spectrum Palette 7 can be defined using your own colors. Each color in every palette is stored as a 24-bit RGB value. I will get to palette 7 editing in another post. Using the Apple ][ palette, let's say you decide to change the background to dark blue and the foreground to aquamarine. This is the result: If you don't want to change the colors, hit the ESC key. This causes any changes to be cancelled, leaving the background/foreground colors as they are. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Another thing you could do is have some picture to look at while programming. To change the background to a picture, press a certain key combination. Pictures can be uploaded from flash drives. If you have a flash drive installed, it will list all the picture files on it. The screen would look like this: Press the appropriate button (0-9 or A-Z, depending on the number of pictures) to choose the picture. If there are too many picture files to fit on one page, press left or right to move to another page. For example, let's say you want to use the following image. It's the back of an old McCormick food coloring box from 1975. This picture was taken from Etsy: When pictures are loaded into memory, they are stored as 24-bit RGB values for simplicity of decoding. The picture is also scaled to a size of 480*360 so it can fit on the screen. The picture replaces the background color. Here's how the screenshot at the top of the page would look with this picture as the background: You can change the picture by going back to the picture menu. Plus, you can choose to go back to a solid color background by going to the background color change menu. The foreground color change menu works the same. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- In addition to pictures, you could also use a video for the background. The video loops forever. Like with pictures, you could upload videos from a flash drive. They can be in any format, but each frame is converted to 24-bit RGB format before being displayed. Frames are buffered. You could also choose to play two or more videos in a continuous loop. After one video ends, the next one starts. After the last video, it wraps back to the first one and the cycle repeats forever. Next, I'll mention code-as-you-go, one of the most important aspects of this type of computer.
  8. walker7

    Picture BG

    From the album: The Best Assembly Computer

    The same simulated assembler screenshot, but with a picture background.
  9. From the album: My Game Collection

    1984 Radio Shack Tandy 1000 IBM PC compatible. Monitor is a Commodore unit.
  10. Polybius

    coco2 part 4

    From the album: My Game Collection

    the tandy coco2, with joysticks and games.
  11. ATARI MEGA 2 COMPUTER 2MB RAM BLITTER 8MHZ RETRO CONSOLE SYSTEM REFURBISHED Refurbished and fully tested. Please look at the large pictures at the bottom of this auction. No cracks to the case and, considering its age, this Atari is in good condition but minor scratches and some yellowing. The Atari comes with a power cable (on request). Fully tested with an external floppy drive, monochrome and colour monitor, hard drive, printer and RF output to ensure all ports are operational. Technical details:- Processor: 68000 Frequency: 8Mhz Blitter chip installed TOS v1.02 GEM v0.13 AES v1.20 Ports at the back of the unit; Modem, printer, MIDI OUT, MIDI IN, Monitor, External floppy disk drive and Hard Disk. Other ports; Cartridge port and keyboard/mouse input socket Ideal for Cubase, games and other MIDI applications Some yellowing - see pictures below Manufactured 22/04/1987 TOS v1.02 is arguably the most compatible version of the Atari ST operating system with most software. The floppy drive head has been cleaned and reads, writes and formats floppy disks reliably. The memory has been tested with a 100 pass hardware memory read and write test. The Atari has been running for 24 hours to ensure to ensure there are no overheating issues. EXTERNAL KEYBOARD ALSO AVAILABLE IF INTERESTED Postage information I always ensure the Atari systems I courier are very well packaged to avoid damage in transit. For buyers in the European Union, Russia, USA and Far East please contact me first to confirm the postage price before buying this item. What's included in this auction Atari MEGA 2 computer RF aerial cable (on request) Price: £70.00 + P&P P&P to UK: £12.50 P&P to Europe: £25.00 P&P to rest of the world: POA
  12. From the album: My Game Collection

    closeup of commodore monitor
  13. Algus

    The power supply

    From the album: Chromebook Unboxing Mar 2013

    What comes in the power supply box. Small and light, fairly standard power supply really but nice that it isn't bulky and will travel well

    © 2013 Curtis Mitchell

  14. Hello, everyone! While I've been a long time AtariAge member, this is my first time in the Atari computer forum. I hope you folks can offer some advice on a rummage sale purchase. I recently acquired a working 800XL unit. Thrilled, I brought it home and everything worked great! While searching this forum on another topic, I discovered that some of the power supplies for this model tended to die violently with a huge spike in voltage destroying the computer. Unfortunately, it looks like the power adapter I have is of the infamous Ignot design: Fortunately, I tested the output with a multimeter, and it was outputting a nice 5.14 volts unloaded. Still, I was nervous about the whole thing, so I went looking around for another power supply. Low and behold at the same rummage sale the next day, they had this puppy: 2.8 amps at 5 volts, a switching power supply which I think should be more reliable. The unloaded output is the same 5.14 volts as the original power supply. It is much smaller than the original Ignot, but that shouldn't make a difference, should it? What do you think? Can I use this to safely replace my 800XL ignot power supply after cutting the cords and splicing them to the DIN adapter? Your advice and opinions are greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!
  15. Looking for Tandy Color Computer Games and accessories. Buy or trade, I can consider either. PM me if you have any you would like to sell, thanks! (images are not mine, used for reference. )
  16. Hi guys, For sale is the portable Atari as seen in Terminator 2 In great condition, works fine, uses batteries Price: 70 Euro + shipping (10 Euro) If interested, reply or message me You can even simulate the cracking program from the movie with a .bat file Clip from the movie scene: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58h7AHim4Vg
  17. Just wanted to see if anybody had a basic Apple IIGS setup(monitor, keyboard, mouse, some kind of floppy drive, maybe joystick) and get an idea of what they're going for. Fascinating little system.
  18. I made a slideshow... Thanks
  19. I've got it up on kickstarter leading towards the onespark event here in jacksonville, where it is also registered. check it out at www.theimagic.com thoughts and input welcome!
  20. MAME 0.200 Todays MAME release has two consecutive zeros in the version number! The only other time that happened was over twelve years ago! Although MAME version numbers are are just an incrementing number, by a series of coincidences, MAME 0.200 delivers several major changes. First of all, if youre building MAME with Microsoft Visual Studio (MSVC), youll need Visual Studio 2017. Weve dropped support for Visual Studio 2015. Starting this month, were building the official Windows binaries with GCC 7.3 this probably wont affect you (we still support building with GCC 5 and up). Were mirroring tagged releases at GitLab (source only) and SourceForge (source and binaries), so if for some reason youre unable to access GitHub, youll still be able to download official MAME releases. MAME 0.200 includes replacements for the memory system and callback API. This will enable new functionality and make MAME development more straightforward. The artwork layout system has also had an overhaul which opens new possibilities. Weve tried our best not to break things, but if you do find something wrong, let us know at MAME Testers, or on our IRC channel #mame on the freenode network. In arcade emulation this month, we have a number of new versions of supported titles, including a very rare prototype of Led Storm Rally 2011 and three more Street Fighter II': Champion Edition bootlegs. Dreamcast/NAOMI colours are greatly improved thanks to snickerbockers, and cam900 fixed some graphical effects in Gals Panic 3 and Billiard Academy Real Break. Enik Land improved emulation of the Sega Master System, Game Gear and Mega Drive VDPs, covering more corner cases. The really exciting emulation improvements this month are on the computer side. There are lots of improvements for UK home computers, including better Camputers Lynx tape support (with lots of additions to the software list), re-worked Acorn System emulation, and support for Acorn Bus slot devices. Weve got a brand-new modernised Apple IIgs driver, with improvements in just about every area. Also, Wayder updated the Sharp 68000 software list, correcting and organising the entries and adding the latest clean dumps. But even more exciting is the fact that, thanks to Patrick Mackinlays gargantuan effort and persistence, the CLIPPER-based InterPro 2000 workstation now works well enough to install and run CLIX (a UNIX operating system). As far as we know, this is a first for MAME. The improvements to SCSI, CD-ROM, and serial emulation also benefit other emulated computer systems. Instructions are on the MAMEdev wiki if you want to try it out. As usual, you can get source and Windows binaries from the download page.
  21. This next section is a big one. Wouldn't it be great if you could test code as you programmed it? Well that's where Code-As-You-Go comes into play. The mode can be accessed with a dedicated button on a keyboard. It's labeled "CAYG." Take a look at this: That's the code as you go screen. On the panel at the right, you can enter the data you want to test. On the upper right of the screen is the address that the code will assemble to. In this example, the written code will compile at address $001404. You could instead have it display which line of the source code the code will go in. First, give the subroutine a name. In this example, we have a routine called "TetrisLFSR." This will be a Motorola 68000 version of the NES Tetris RNG routine. The NES version of Tetris iterates its RNG (a 16-bit LFSR) in the following manner: Set the output bit to the XOR of bits 1 and 9, and right-shift that input into the RNG. We will replicate this routine as we enter the code. For this test, enter the input in d0. We need to enter a 16-bit value. Using a mouse, click on the fourth-to-last digit of the d0 register, then type "7259." The digit highlighted in green is the cursor. Note that the register values are displayed in hexadecimal. If you enter an invalid hexadecimal digit, nothing happens. When you enter the last digit, the cursor stays there. (If it were an A-register, the cursor would be red.) Now, time for the first instruction. Type "move.b", tab, then "d0,d2", and hit Enter (if you hit Space, it will tab for you). When you press Enter, the last line of code you wrote is automatically executed in the CAYG window, and its machine language code appears in the window as well. In M68K assembly, the instruction "move.b d0,d2" is represented by $1400. The screen looks like this: Note that after you typed the code line, that instruction automatically executed. The last byte of d0 is $59, so the last byte of d2 is now also $59. The next two instructions are "move.w d0,d1" and "lsr.w #8,d1". These are necessary to retrieve the upper byte of a 16-bit value in d1. After the second line was typed, d1 became $7259. After the third line, it became $0072. In the machine code box is E049, which is the code for "lsr.w #8,d1." Remember, only the compiled code for the last line you typed appears in the machine code box. Next, we want to take the XOR of bits 1 and 9 of the bytes in d1 and d2. Since 1 and 9 differ by exactly 8, no shifting of either byte is needed. Just XOR the bytes by typing "eor.b d2,d1", then pressing Enter. Register d1 is now equal to $2B, which is the XOR of $72 and $59. It is bit 1 from this value we need to extract and get into the X (extend) flag. To do this, type "lsr.b #2,d1", and press Enter. The value in d1 became $0A. But more importantly, look at the X and C flags. They lit up, so their value is 1. Any flag that is clear appears as white-on-black, while a set flag is indicated by the opposite color scheme. Since the XOR of bits 1 and 9 of our 16-bit value was 1, a 1 will be right-shifted in to get the new RNG value. Here is the last piece of the puzzle. Now that we have our output bit in X (and C), we can use a "roxr" instruction to shift it in. Type "roxr.w #1,d0", and hit Enter. And there you have it. The new RNG value is $B92C. With the ability to see the code execute as you type it, coding will become as easy as pie. You could also toggle register updating off/on, and you could also move your cursor to any line in the code, and press a certain button to step through the code and see the results. After finishing the code, press the CAYG button again. All the code you wrote in the CAYG screen will be placed at the place in the source code you were at when you went to this screen. You can then edit it, delete it, or change it as normal. All in all, the code-as-you-go feature could be a breakthrough for future assemblers. No matter whether it's 6502, M68K, Z80, or anything else, it's the next innovation in coding.
  22. walker7

    Picture BG Menu

    From the album: The Best Assembly Computer

    This is the menu you would enter if you wanted to view a picture for a background while assembling.
  23. From the album: The Best Assembly Computer

    This is the same simulated assembler screenshot, except the background is changed to dark blue and the foreground changed to aquamarine.
  24. From the album: My Game Collection

    Another shot of the 64K Tandy CoCo 2 I recently acquired (April 22, 2018)
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