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Found 99 results

  1. Hi everyone. I'm putting together vintage computer and console related items which I hope to sell. Please click below to see the current items I'm listing. Items For Sale I'll be adding more as I test, and package the items. Thanks, John
  2. While researching my documentary on the many types of Atari VCS hardware, clones, and add-on adapters to allow other systems to play Atari, I had to include the attempted cartridge adapters from Cardco and Protecto that were advertised in the early 80s, but of course ended up being vaporware.
  3. There is a new DIY through hole FujiNet hardware design that uses the espressif devkitc-ve board. It's basically a shield for the devkit board with all the needed bits for FujiNet. I'm happy to finally see someone else release hardware based on the completely open FujiNet design. https://github.com/djtersteegc/fujinet-devkit-shield
  4. Pokeymax v3 is now available for pre-order. Features: Quad Pokey Dual SID Dual PSG Four channel Covox, with Paula style DMA GTIA audio digital pass though SIO audio mixing PBI audio mixing May be updated/configured via software on Atari Larger 10M16 FPGA, leaving adequate resources for future enhancements Spare 5V safe IO for future enhancements For the pre-orders Retronics are offering a special promotional price of 99USD. Note that version 2 will remain available for the simpler mono/stereo Pokey/Covox options. --- Ordering info from @Duddie --- Additional features confirmed: SPDIF digital output (TTL level, excludes SIO in/PBI in) PS2 keyboard input
  5. Hello everyone! I picked up this device at a surplus electronic store, and I wanted to know if you folks might have more information on what it is, how to use it, etc.? I believe it is an EPROM programmer but I cannot find any info on it when I look it up or the associated company (Timely Technology). I wondered if it could be used to write to EPROM chips for creating homebrew cartridges for the 2600 but I'm not sure what else I would need to get it hooked to a modern computer. I think one of the cables is a parallel port but I'm not 100%. I'm hoping someone can point me in the right direction with this!
  6. I recently got a beige non-QI TI-99/4a system with a speech synth and several cartridges, including Extended BASIC and Editor Assembler. The joysticks I have are worn out and don't work. I was able to revive the Mitsumi mylar keyboard. I don't have a PEB or memory expansion or disk drive. I'd like to do some BASIC and assembler coding on the system, as well as play some games. What should I be looking for? Stuff I'm considering to do or purchase... - Cassette cable and recorder - Atari joystick adapter interface - Is there a preferred model? Most that I see don't have any kind of case on them. - Memory expansion - What is the go to for adding more memory to this system? - Disk drive, or disk drive emulator - I have a Gotek drive in my Amiga. My Coco has an SDC cartridge. My Atari connects to my Windows PC to retrieve files. How can I emulate a disk drive on the TI-99/4a? - I'm currently connected to a TV using a component video cable. Are there any video upgrades for the TI-99/4a to use VGA, component or HDMI? - I have an MX-80 parallel printer. Can I connect this to the TI-99/4a? Is it worth the hassle? - Is there an assembler/editor that works on a TI system without a disk drive? How about without the 32K expansion? I've done some searching online, and checked out some of the online vendors and eBay. Most of the info I find is outdated and I'm not sure which of the upgrades are good for a system today. Any and all info is appreciated!
  7. #FujiNet is a complex beast, for sure. It has tons of firmware, and would need a full ESP32 emulation, or high level equivalents of everything in the firmware. This is infeasible, and @phaeron has admitted as much. But I was talking to @48kRAM tonight, and he posed a question: What if there could be a simple UDP bridge that bridged over SIO to a real FujiNet? This is possible, because the FujiNet can run entirely stand-alone, not connected to an Atari, only needing power. It could be placed into a mode where it would reflect the SIO traffic to UDP packets to the FujiNet and back. So while you would need a FujiNet device, they're only $65, and you wouldn't need a physical Atari to run it on. It would allow for software development to take place, very easily, and within the confines of emulation, where you have _EXCELLENT_ debugging facilities. @phaeron is the python device server stuff documented? Could it be used to prototype something for this? Thoughts? -Thom
  8. Hello, I have a used PAT 9000 that I am ready to sell. I figured I would put it here first before ebay or Craigslist. It was tested and working back in the late 1990s (by Dunis in Portland, OR), but has sat unused for years. It powers up, but I have no way to test it. The XY monitor was tested back then and was not working - diagnosed as a flyback issue. It comes with a mess of plugs, the PAT 9000 manual, some assorted game manuals, and at least 2 Ampliphone deflection boards - untested, condition unknown. Everything is being sold AS-IS. DM me with your best offer. Sorry, I can't ship this - way too heavy! I live in the San Jose, CA area. Own a unique piece of Atari history!! https://drive.google.com/drive/u/1/folders/1-tqG-7dPjIVDedUjWnIIDimyQfmEnBJM
  9. I've seen articles about putting RAM on the 16-bit part of the bus to gain some speed, and am thinking of building one. However, I'm not sure about being able to fit it under the RF shielding clamshells. Ideas? What kind of metal are the clamshells made of? Is it readily available? K-R.
  10. Mean Time Before Failure - It's starting to look like this is beginning to effect more and more P-Box power supplies. Preemptive Maintenance - Fixing the situation before it destroys something else more expensive with it's failure or, puts one out of service. Plug & Play - Designed so even the least technical people in the consumer market will feel comfortable installing it, ensuring more sales. Limited Targeted Market - Niche markets, usually have test markets or single runs of a moderate size to keep costs down. I'm thinking it may be time for "someone out there" to consider a viable Plug & Play replacement for the P-Box power supply. 1 - Could the cost be reasonable? (How much are you willing to spend for an easy replacement to protect your equipment) 2 - Could it be a direct replacement, not requiring any other modifications from the customer. 3 - Could there be "an extra" on the board as a further inducement to purchase? (Example: USB power port)
  11. So a long while ago I had a bright idea on a "captain's chair" 'controller' for playing Star Raiders on the 8-bit / 5200. My thought is a joystick on one arm of the chair (e.g. on the right, for right-handed folks), with a thumb trigger on top, or index finger trigger on the front, so it can be controlled entirely with one hand. On the other side, there'd be a keypad controller (like used by the 2600 version of the game), offering the various toggle controls: front view (F) aft view (A) long range view (L) galactic map (G) attack computer (C) targeting computer (T) target selector (M) shields (S) hyperwarp (H) pause (P) That's 10 keys, so totally doable with a 12-button keyboard controller, connected to the second controller port. Finally, on that same side (e.g., left, for right-handed users) would be an analog throttle, like you see in a boat. Fully forward (towards the TV) would be "twin-ion engine" at full-speed (9), and fully back (toward the player) would be full-stop (0). This would be connected to the paddle input of controller port 1, alongside the main digital joystick input (if I'm reading things right, it looks like the POT stuff is used by keyboard controllers). Obviously, a hacked version of Star Raiders would be required for this to work (read paddle for engine control, read keyboard controller for other keyboard control). It'd be a pretty cool set-up, though, don't you think? Sadly, I don't have the skill to do either the hardware, or the ROM hacking. 😛
  12. Hi folks, I am new at AtariAge. Months ago, I've got an AV-modded european Atari 2600 Jr. (Rev. F board) in a great condition for cheap. However, here at my country (Brazil), PAL-B compatible TV sets are rare to find. The closest color system that is supported by most TVs is PAL-N (PAL variation used in Argentina and a few more countries in South America). I tried to replace the 4.433618 MHz XTAL with a 3.582056 MHz one, but that gave me no colors in any PAL-N compatible set. Also tried to replace the 3.546894 MHz one with a second 3.582056 MHz XTAL, but still gave me nothing but B&W picture. Is there something I can do to make this console output PAL-N? Both systems are 50 Hz and have the same resolution, so it should work somehow. Thanks a lot!
  13. Truths: the FinalGROM has a massive amount of storage space. the TIPI also has a massive amount of storage space. So the question is, on which device you store most of your games? While the poll is anonymous, please feel free to tell us WHY you have one preference over another.
  14. Hi everyone. I sold this Atari 400 with 410 recorder on eBay with no only a power cable, no plug attached. The buyer purchased an additionally required cable to hook up to a screen and when he turned on this appears on the screen. The eBayer 100% knows what they are doing and said if I partially refund then he will get it fixed. He only paid £50 for it. Is this a case of cleaning the inside with some alcohol and putting it back together? System hasn’t been used in...25 years. Many thanks for your help.
  15. Hello, If anyone one has or has had any experience with the xl eprom burner (the one that plugs into the cart slot of an xl/xe) and can spare a few posts/time to help me out with a couple questions please reply or send a private message. It would be much appreciated!
  16. Hi, recently bought a 1050 where a Happy-Clone from IRATA (Berlin Germany) is installed. It also runs flawlessly, only it has a few more contact surfaces (see picture), and I can not find ANYWHERE documents. So I wanted to know if any of you still have information about it (Schematics, Switches like "Speed on/off" a.s.o.) It is also recognized by Happy-Tooldisk 1 as Happy, and the tests run completely, except for ROM positive - But I had the same with another Happy-Clone that it hooked right there, which is also logical, because the values of the EPROM are not 100% those of the origin. I just want to know what else I can do with it, that is, what else I can connect and above all where on the PINS. And important : What features are included? tya for reading 🙂
  17. OdysseyNow Game Pack 2 is now available to pre-order! It includes 3 games, an Odyssey system upgrade, and a set of major new peripherals: Left and Right English Splitters. We've set up a simple Paypal webstore for this, here. We are only producing 15 copies ever of this set. Paypal is keeping track of inventory. It will only take your money if copies are still available! I'll update this post once they are sold out. Read about Game Pack 2 in this thread. For more discussion on this, and early announcements, please consider joining our Facebook group devoted to Odyssey and early video games. We are have produced everything included with this set except for the scoreboard listed below; we are waiting for those to be produced. When we receive them, all orders will ship. It could be in December, or at the latest, early January. All proceeds from these sales go toward funding the OdysseyNow project, to research and develop more hardware and games for the system! Here's the complete list of contents: Left English Splitter set (Splitter Base + English Controller) Right English Splitter set (Splitter Base + English Controller) English Splitter Instructions Wall Adjustment Upgrade kit Danceoff overlay Danceoff plastic dancer pieces (6 red and 6 blue) in velveteen bag Dice X2 (black and red) Danceoff Instructions Team Volleyball Overlay Team Volleyball Instructions Soccer overlay (recreation) Soccer Instructions (reproduction) Soccer dual-wheel scoreboard (85% scale reproduction)
  18. We are readying our next release of newly developed Odyssey hardware and games: OdysseyNow Game Pack 2! The largest focus will be on hardware, as this will contain the most consequential hardware add-on in the Odyssey’s history. It will make new games possible, as well as have a major impact on many existing games. We call it the English Splitter. In the original Odyssey controller, three knobs and one button control every aspect of the player spots and the ball. The problem is that the human body only possesses two hands, and thus we can operate a maximum of two knobs simultaneously. This affects every Odyssey ball game, as the hand and brain must “switch gears” from controlling the Vertical knob to controlling the English knob (ball spin). This gap of time involved slows down the games. One of the greatest Odyssey ball games, Volleyball, is terribly hindered by this: there just isn’t enough time to lunge after the ball, hit it, then switch to the English knob fast enough to direct the ball over the net and then down into the opposite court. As a result, the game has to be played on a relatively low ball speed. The English Splitter is a device that plugs into your controller socket (there’s one for the Left and one for the Right; each is electronically equivalent but physically different). Each English Splitter is connected by a cable to a special English Controller, which contains one knob and one button. The Splitter also contains a duplicate controller port into which you plug your original controller. Thus when both Left and Right Splitters are plugged in, you will have four controllers in total. Each Splitter contains a switch that turns the English Controller on or off. When on, it takes over control of the English knob from the main controller (turning the main controller English knob will have no effect, but turning the knob on the English controller will give that player full control over ball spin). When the Splitter’s switch is turned off, full control is transferred back to the main controller. This way you will never have to plug and unplug your controllers and Splitters in order to instantly switch between classic and split modes. In addition, the yellow button on each English Controller allows the holder of that controller to serve the ball. This makes it possible for a single player to, for instance, return the ball to their own side without requiring possession of the other player’s main controller. This can be used in the original game Submarine or the OdysseyNow game Tannhauser Gate, for instance, to greatly ease gameplay. The English Splitter system can also be used to multiply the number of players from 2 to 4. Any ball game can now be played with 3 or 4 players, with English control transferred to a second player on each team. It can be used to great effect in nearly any ball game. Our new version of Volleyball, Team Volleyball, makes full use of this capability: Note: This image is a simulation. Our game comes with a half-height overlay. In addition to Team Volleyball, this game pack includes Danceoff, a new ball game that is meant to be played for the duration of one pop song. It involves attempting to “knock” the opposing side’s dancers off the dancefloor. This game can be played 2-player, but when played with 4 players using the English Controllers, it becomes a team dance in which one player defends the team’s dancers while the other goes after those on the opposing side. The dancers are plastic chips that are physically stuck to the overlay and removed as they are defeated. Before the game begins, players may either choose a pattern for their dancers to occupy or randomly generate their positions with two included, color-coded dice. The third game included in this game pack is a reproduction of the rarest of all original Odyssey games: Soccer. Soccer was only released as a bundled game with some European releases of the Odyssey. Because the Odyssey did not do well in Europe, and not many sets have been preserved, the game is almost impossible to find. We have lovingly reproduced the overlay, instructions, and dual-wheel scoreboard in all of their detail, allowing this game to be played by a new generation. Note, however, that our scoreboard is 85% of the size of the original. We had to made it slightly smaller to be cost effective to produce, and to fit in our tube box. The overlay is reproduced with filled-out corners for a rectangular shape, to better fit more contemporary televisions. However, the original rounded contour is preserved as a thin line in the overlay, so players may cut out the original shape if they wish. The English Splitter sounds deceptively simple, but inside it is anything but: the unique analog nature of the Odyssey makes simple pass-through circuits impossible, and multiple versions of this device failed before a year of development finally lead to the breakthrough (specially implemented diode logic) that made it possible. It is also very time consuming and expensive (using obsolete, discontinued components) to manufacture, or we would be able to make more and charge less! In order to get the most out of Team Volleyball (or even regular Volleyball), this Pack comes with a Wall Height Adjustment kit. This is an optional upgrade. It requires two solder points on the Odyssey’s motherboard, and some hot glue for the final adjustment pot. It is an easy upgrade to perform and comes with fully illustrated instructions. When used with the Team Volleyball overlay, you can adjust your wall height to exact spec. Most Odysseys are well out of spec for wall height, which can greatly diminish this game. This game pack confers a couple of advantages to Tannhauser Gate, for owners of OdysseyNow Game Pack 1. First, you can adjust the height of the open gate with the Wall Height adjustment. Second, the Scan player can utilize an English controller to return their ball without needing to reach over and utilize the Explore player’s controller. We have several more amazing games in development that make special use of the English Splitters. Those will appear sometime in the future. Because our last game pack sold out within a few hours of being posted, we’re trying to manage this release a little more equitably, in two tiers. The notice for the first 10 copies will be posted in the OdysseyNow Facebook group (only), to give that community the best chance of picking these up. We're letting everyone know this in advance, to give you time to join that group and turn your notifications on so you are ready. Once those copies are gone, we'll post elsewhere (such as in this forum). At that time, anyone who wants one will have to let us know (very briefly) why/where/who. We'll give it a few days to ensure that more people will know about this in time, then select the homes we think will be happiest, and then process payments. This will also help us get to know more of you better! We will produce only 15 of these sets in total. Stay tuned to the Facebook group for orders to open soon! https://www.facebook.com/groups/odysseynow/
  19. I was pouting over the lousy 64KB of ram in my 65XE the other day and decided to look into expansion options. It's one of those without the ECI port, so it would need to be an internal unit. Looking at what was out there, I wasn't very happy. How about I try my own hand at it? Here's my initial thoughts on the matter. The idea is 1) it must use the "standard" CIA PORTB for bank control, 2) it cannot interfere with the normal operation of any of the bits, and 3) it should support CPU/ANTIC bank control. I looked at the memory available online... what do you know, there's a 2Mx8 5V 45ns SRAM from Digikey for about $5. Two of them would fill out a full 8 bit bank select just peachy. But how do you get 8 bank address lines from the port without interfering with the operation of the bits? A latch comes to mind. And that's the main thing - a hex D-Type flip-flop. Clearing PB7 will clear the latch, so asserting the self-test ROM will just clear the latch. No problem there. I use PB6 as the flip-flop clock (latched on rising edge). So if this were in an XEGS, clearing PB6 enables the Missile Command rom, which wouldn't be an issue as long as the code to switch banks isn't in either the bank memory space or in the rom cart space. No problem there, either, especially on systems without Missile Command. I use PB5-0 as the inputs to the d-flip-flops... no problems there as long as the code to switch banks isn't in bank memory space, the cart space, or the OS ram space... so in the first 16KB; oh, and the ints are off unless you keep the int code and data in the first 16KB as well. Still not an issue. But how do I get 8 bank address bits from 6 latched bits. Well, just use PB2 and 3 as normal. The latched bits extend them from 2 bits to 8 bits. Use A21 and it's inverse to select one of the two sram chips, use PB4 and 5 along with A14 and A15 and /HALT to generate the other chip enable, a few gates for output enable and write enable and Bob's your uncle. The prices in the pic are from Digikey in single unit quantities for surface mount parts. A handful of bypass caps to round it out at less than $15 in parts... minus the board. That's gonna be the "fun" part. Been a while since I made a board. I'll update as I get further along. Comments and suggestions are appreciated.
  20. Hello friends, I recently came into some new Super Famicom hardware, including two mystery controllers that I absolutely cannot find any information on. I suspect they are nothing special but I'd like to be sure. This forum seems like the perfect resource, full of knowledgeable folks who might be able to identify such things. Please see attached images. The controller is called the "Master Blaster" which really complicates getting a decent google search. I have two, non-functional and one functional but in need of silicon repair. I don't have the means to try and fix the non-functional one. Just wondering if some museum would benefit having these before I potentially get rid of em. Thanks!
  21. Not sure if anyone here has the knowledge to have a discussion on a technical level concerning the MSX standard. But I have a few questions concerning the various slot signals. 1) I see very few references to the SW1 & SW2 signals, other than they should be connected together on the cartridge pcb. However, no mention of where they go, or what they do. I'm assuming that there is some bit in some register set or reset. But I can't find any reference to it. Anyone have any idea? 2) As far as CS1, CS2, and CS12, I am assuming that these three select lines function independent of individual slots? I.e., they should be active on all slots at the same time, and not gated to specific slots? 3) SLTSL seems fairly easy to generate. My understanding is that the register A8h provides the 2-bit slot number for pages 0-3 of the 64k of memory. So I should be able to use a 1-to-4 decode on A15 & A14 to create my page select lines, and then just gate them properly with the A8h register to have the possible outcomes. (Been working on a truth table, but it going to be fairly extensive. This could probably be implemented with a fairly fast EEPROM for the logic). I understand how the decode works I think. I just want to verify I am not missing anything here. Any traps for noobs? If you're wanting more information as to the scope of what I'm doing, I am designing an expansion adapter for my MSX1 to open up Slots 2 & 3, possibly decoding one to the 4 secondary slots.
  22. To the Odyssey 1 (1972) community: I'm excited to be able to be able to release 10 copies of our new game pack for the Odyssey. It includes three brand new games, a newly designed game card with an attached controller, and the first ACC controller besides the original light gun. These kits are 100% hand-assembled. The overlays are full laser prints on translucent film; no transparencies (which do not display properly), no ink (which can smear), and no undersized or partial overlays. These are all the full, original Magnavox size for 19in screens. Note that we do not have the ability to manufacture 26in overlays. The Tannhauser Gate overlay includes a fully opaque element (the black hole), which is applied as a separate, opaque layer of special material to the back of the overlay. To learn more about the games and hardware, see this thread. To learn more about the OdysseyNow project, see this thread. The entire set of hardware and games comes in the following cylindrical case: Complete list of contents: OdysseyNow Game Pack cylindrical case Card 13 Card 13 Switch Controller Damocles Controller Damocles Controller power supply Tannhauser Gate overlay Tannhauser Gate instructions Tannhauser Gate cards (3 decks) Fukushima overlay Fukushima Meltdown Cycle card Fukushima instructions Super Cat and Mouse: Cheesy Castle overlay Super Cat and Mouse instructions Bonus Game: Trumpocalypse instructions Needless to say, nothing like this has ever been released for Odyssey before, and we are proud to push the platform forward, 47 years after the console's release! The price is $150 for the set, plus shipping. At only $50 per game, plus substantial new hardware, this is less than the other significant homebrews of the past. However, I am only releasing 10 copies, so this is an extremely limited release. I just want to get a few copies of our work out there for people to enjoy; we don't have the capacity or interest to manufacture large numbers. Any money we bring in from this release will go straight into further game and hardware development; we are not doing this for profit. All items have been manufactured and will ship within one week of your purchase. To purchase, PM me with your Paypal email address and shipping address and I'll send you a Paypal invoice. The first 10 payments received will get the set. Any others will be canceled/refunded. I'll update this post when all 10 copies have been sold. Thanks for your interest and support of the Odyssey!
  23. I still have the orig Playstation I purchased in 1996. It's worked quite well over the years. I modded it long ago. A year or so ago the occasional CD would not load or load slowly. I assumed drive was about to give up the ghost. Then the machine wouldn't spin at all and the display would flicker repeatedly. I assumed a PSU failure had taken place -- replace it with an eBay unit (with a blue LED) and that problem went away. But the CD-ROM drive problem got worse. Finally I couldn't load anything. It sounded like a spin issue. So, I bought a replacement new mechanism on eBay and installed it. I hear spinning and seeking, but the spinning doesn't last as long as it should and the seeking sounds stuttered -- as if it's having trouble focusing - not normal. So I looked and there was no other seller of such parts so I rolled the dice and purchased ANOTHER mechanism from the same guy and it's the same thing. Spinning that slows down -- I can hear like 5 spins per second before it stops, and it won't load anything. The seek sound sounds labored also. This is the unit and vendor I twice purchased for my SCPH-1001: https://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-OPTICAL-LASER-LENS-MECHANISM-for-SONY-Playstation-SCPH-1001/360534474878 Does anyone have any advice here? For whatever reason I'd like to keep this unit working rather than buying a used, modded PS1. Thanks. bp
  24. I’m excited to show you the OdysseyNow Game Pack, the result of a lot of research and development at the Vibrant Media Lab that I direct in Pittsburgh. We’ve developed a brand new game card for the Odyssey (the first one not designed by the Magnavox team), a brand new accessory controller (the first created besides the original light rifle), and a set of three new games. This was all produced as part of the OdysseyNow project, which you can read more about in another AtariAge thread. Here’s a glimpse of the games… Tannhauser Gate In a remote wing of a remote galaxy, on the frontiers of cosmic knowledge, lies Tannhauser's Gate, a colossal directed energy beam fed by a spacio-temporal anomaly of seemingly ceaseless energy. On the other side of the Gate is The Expanse, one of the most mysterious and deadly regions of outer space yet discovered, a zone that seems to vacillate in its allegiance to the laws of the quantum to the laws of the galactic. Spacetime here seems to have a will of its own. Charybdis, a black hole, lies not far from the Gate, and is clearly related to it in some way. Crimson Maw, a mostly uninhabitable planet, nonetheless provides researchers in the area with an ample supply of both common and rare minerals. Unfortunately, the planet and its single natural satellite, “Odysseus,” are isolated from the gate by the massive parade of interstellar stone known as the Scyllan Corridor. Closer at hand, yet surprisingly more barren, is the planet Coronation. Because few minerals or supplies of interest can be found there, it is used mostly as a garbage dump. Such is the fate of even the most regal of mineral-poor planets. Multiple interstellar civilizations have sent researchers to the area, mainly in an attempt to understand the intergalactic wormhole that serves to connect this remote spot to the energy-rich Flywheel Galaxy via Quantum Refluctuation. While ostensibly a demilitarized zone, Tannhauser Gate is plagued by intense rivalry over the scientific knowledge that it provides to its sponsoring corporations, governments, and collectives. These researchers must uneasily share a moon base shielded by the Gate. To venture beyond its boundaries is to be bombarded with a relentless stream of dark particles. No shields can last for long. While an interstellar team of engineers has managed to harness the local energy flux to construct the Gate, its operation remains partially at the whim of the energy patterns that feed it, making the expanse beyond the Gate even more risky to explore. For this reason, the largest scientific collective to currently study the area has created a specialized, long-range scanning platform. Located safely behind Tannhauser Gate, it launches and receives C-beams capable of probing any form of matter. Their rivals, however, use replicant-manned spacecraft to explore outside of the Gate, directly. Take on the roles of the Scanner, Explorer, and Gate Keeper as you compete to complete your missions and disrupt your rivals. Will you be the one to discover the secret of Tannhauser Gate? Tannhauser Gate is a 3 player game that makes use of a newly designed game card (#13). This card includes an external Aux jack and a “Switch Controller” that attaches to it. The card generates the Tannhauser Gate. The switch controller opens and closes the gate. The Gate Keeper player draws a special Gate card at the beginning of each round, which contains a special gate pattern that must be followed. The Scanner player remains stationary throughout the round, but may send C-beams (represented by the Odyssey’s ball) through the gate to scan various objects in the expanse beyond. The Scanner draws Scan cards that provide specific assignments to carry out. Meanwhile, the Explorer must charge up their ship, activate their life support system, wait for the right moment, and zip out into the expanse, attempting to complete their missions (given on special Explore cards) and return to safety inside the gate before their ship is destroyed by the energy fields of the expanse. This is extremely risky, however, as misjudging the ever-changing rhythm of the gate could cause the ship to implode before it can reach safety! In addition to Game Card #13 and the Switch Controller, Tannhauser Gate makes use of the Damocles controller, the first Accessory controller for the Odyssey besides the light rifle. The Damocles controller plugs into the ACC port on the Odyssey. When Player 2 presses the large red button on its face, a countdown timer lights up and begins counting down. When it hits zero, it extinguishes your on-screen player spot. Its button also lights up red to remind you that you’re dead! A white “regen” button allows you to regenerate your ship when the time is right. In Tannhauser Gate, all three players are doing completely different tasks using completely different tools, yet all three interact in unexpected ways (the gate can bounce the Scanner’s C-Beams away as well as “lock out” the Explorer at a crucial moment, Scan missions can require the Scanner to scan the Explorer, and Explore missions sometimes require the Explorer to intercept C-Beams. The results ensure that no two games of Tannhauser Gate are the same! Fukushima Fukushima is the first-ever cooperative game for the Magnavox Odyssey. Two players are placed inside the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and must work together to prevent the inevitable: a meltdown. Each player takes on a different role in the plant. Player 2 uses the Damocles controller to continually complete a Cooling Cycle, while also assisting Player 1 complete a progressively more difficult Maintenance Cycle, which involves directing the ball to specific points while also activating particular buttons at specific times. This would be enough of a challenge as it is, but a third player with a timer consults a Meltdown reference card and at the appointed times calls out various new disasters that the players must contend with. (Note: If you only have two players, you could also make a recording of the Meltdown Cycle and play that back during gameplay.) The game starts out easy, but gets progressively more difficult as you try to beat the clock to safely shut down the reactor before it fully melts down. Because the game has a delineated set of “levels,” you can easily track your progress. Your team can even compete against other teams for a high score (level achieved + time survived at the point of failure). No one here has been able to beat the game yet. Maybe you can? Fukushima is not only the first coop Odyssey game, but is also the first to utilize the “Wall adjust” control on the console itself. In this game, the wall represents the reactor’s containment barrier, which must sometimes be moved by the players to gain access. But be very careful: when the containment barrier is open, you must prevent the ball from entering the core or it will instantly melt down! Fukushima requires game card #13 and the Damocles controller. Super Cat and Mouse: Cheesy Castle At OdysseyNow, we are big fans of the underappreciated Cat and Mouse game on the Odyssey. We think that a fun concept and mechanic was undermined by substandard production design, and have decided to re-invent the game by giving it a proper setting: a medieval castle. Now, the mouse must collect cheese strewn about the castle by lazy humans, while avoiding the King’s fierce cat! As the King’s cat, of course, you must rid the castle of that peasant vermin.
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