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Found 17 results

  1. Looking through the AA store homebrew games and hacks, I find it quite disappointing that there are so few reviews. Even top sellers often have less than 10. And quite some games have zero or only one (usually from Nathan) review. So what is stopping you people to post some reviews there? Just describe what you like and (IMO probably even more important) what not. About game play, difficulty, packaging, ... whatever! Anything that you want to say about the game and that might help other people to select from the constantly growing list of homebrews. It doesn't have to be very long and elaborated. A few sentences will do. As an example, here is a link to Scramble. Click on the 4th tab, enter your name, email and review. Then submit. Easy, isn't it? And everyone1 can do, you must not even have bought the game, just played it! So please, start posting NOW! Afterwards, please post here which game you reviewed. So that others can see the progress and to encourage other people to follow your example. Else, please tell us what is stopping you from reviewing. I am really interested. 1 You don't even have to own that cart as long as you have played the game enough to qualify. The review link works for everyone!
  2. I didnt have a clue on where to post this exactly, but I posted a screenshot of what I'm calling Paczerk on the AtariAge Facebook page. Its a little audio and visual hack based on Pac-Man. I took the guys from Lock N' Chase and used the number graphics from the Mattel games and used a different maze and background color. So i am throwing my little hack out there for others to enjoy. Any compliments or complaints, please mention them. Thank you! Paczerk.a26
  3. After few years hiatus I'm happy to announce the restart of Harmony Games HSC. one small change though: instead of doing it here like before we moving it to our new forum at http://avconline.freeforums.net in the harmony games section (I'll post information there shortly how to sign up) Also we're going to use some new games games that been done lately instead doing some of the older ones.. the old harmony games page will be deleted as soon as the games start and new page will be added to the AVC Online Website (you need to register to post on forum, but you can view any topic or section)
  4. Time to announce the Fifth Round of the Harmony games: Laserman 2k3 This is our second Special Game as it will be featured for the Video Game Summit. Laserman 2k3 a hack of Keysonte Kapers for the 2600, where you as Laserman have to chase and catch your arch enemy Dr.X before he escapes his lab while avoiding obstacles like missiles, robots and bombs. Laserman 2k3 was made public on AtariAge.com on June 30th,2003 making it's 10th year anniversary. (first public showing at VGS '04 on emulator, second showing in cart form in VGS'05 So this Round won't offically start until June 30th. and will end July 22nd you can download the game here: http://www.atariage....twareHackID=138 (at the end of the round points will be awarded(10 (for first) to 2(for tenth) 1 for everybody after 10(any scores submitted after this round ends will be given 1 point) As mentioned above this game will be a special game, if an online score beats the live score at VGS'13 a prize will be given (for those in the US, an E-certifiacte to the AVC NewsStand at cafepress.com(25.00) and a digital copy of the VGS Program, for those overseas, A digital copy of VGS Program only(since charges are higher for shipping at cafepress as well not being available in some countries the e-cert is only for US players) Good Luck!!
  5. As stated in Part 1 of Hackitude, my first hack was converting an analog electric alarm clock so that it could turn on a light or radio. Unfortunately I had no pictures of that hack and the device has since been disassembled and scattered to the four winds.A couple weeks ago I found the following diagram among my papers:This diagram reminded me that I had to revamp the hack about three years after I initially built it.When I first built the hack I simply put it together without much planning. As a result the housing for the hack had a few extra holes, the cable between the clock and the main unit was too long and gangly and the wiring inside the main unit looked like a rat's nest. This caused some safety problems. I remember being shocked several times when I touched the main unit. Finally it got bad enough that I had to take the thing apart and rebuild it.The second time I put a little more planning into it and decided to add some functionality. When I drew the circuit diagram, I added a second relay (K2) with the contacts connected to terminals so I could trigger a digital circuit or connect it to a computer. I also added a connector to the wires between the clock and the main unit. This cleaned up the wiring in the clock and allowed me to disconnect the clock whenever I moved (which I did a lot in those days). I also covered the main unit with contact paper. This covered up the extra holes in the box and improved the general look of the unit (originally I simply painted the box with some blue spray paint ).I learned a lot from rebuilding that alarm clock system. The skills I used to plan the rebuild were used later to build other electronic devices and design circuits for school (including the design of a 6809 microcomputer for a final project).Revisiting this hack may not have been entertaining to the reader of this blog but it made me realize that I did more planning in my early hacking days then I then I thought.
  6. Maybe we could extend/include the strip in the RPK format. Maybe like this in the layout file: <strip> <gray> <key1 text="DEL"> <key2 text="INS"> Any emulator could implement the strip if they wanted and as they would see fit. Also, this got me thinking. How about including optional hacks ? It seems we're able to pull off a few with one or a few bytes. Maybe something like this, again in the layout file: <hacks> <socket id="rom_socket" 0x0234="0F 43 22" text="Unlimited lives" state="off"> You'd have to go and change the state to "on" - or an emulator could provide an user interface for turning things on and off.
  7. Time to announce the Sixth Round of the Harmony games: Pac-man Arcade (as suguested by roadrunner at atari age.com) This is a Functional, Graphical and Audio Hack of Ms. Pac-man to look and feel more like the arcade version complete with music and sounds close enough to midways version. Only rule must play the arcade version you can d/l the game here (it also available at atariage store for 20.00 under hacks as Pac- man Arcade) this round ends August 9th Good luck: (at the end of the round points will be awarded(10 (for first) to 2(for tenth) 1 for everybody after 10 (any scores submitted after this round ends will be given 1 point) (as always scores will only be updated on the webpage and AVC Forum(since I have no editing feature here) (you can also post scores on the AVC Forum as well just follow the instructions posted on the harmony games web page)
  8. Remembering My RootsI admit it: I'm a hacker. Not necessarily a great hacker but a hacker nevertheless.That admission is pretty recent. Until a year ago I would deny that what I was doing was hacking. Instead I would insist I was simply applying a creative solution to a problem or just improving the design of the object.That all changed last year when I found this book at OKGE:Hardware Hacking: Have Fun While Voiding Your WarrantyWhen I first saw the book, I leafed through it and realized that, not only could I do some of those hacks, I've already done a few of them! (Or, at least, hacks similar to what was printed in the book.) I bought the book and when I started reading it, old memories resurfaced. I remembered doing all sorts of hacks in my youth including hacks on my stereo equipement and computers. It was this book that inspired me, in part, to make the holders I mentioned earlier in this blog for my Namco systems.My First HackMy very first hack was back when I was twelve or thirteen years old. I found this old analog electric alarm clock at a garage sale and I modified it so that, when the alarm goes off, it turns on a radio, a light or whatever I plugged into the unit. The parts were simple: a relay, power socket, a couple switches and, of course, the clock. Except for the clock, all of the parts went into a aluminum box I acquired from a salvage yard. To make it look nicer, I covered the box with wood grain contact paper. The clock was connected to the box by a cable which supplied power to the clock and connected to the alarm trigger.The alarm normally worked like this: at the preset time, a latch released a thin metal strip that started vibrating loudly against the clock motor. To stop the alarm you pull a tab in the clock which pushed the metal strip away from the clock motor. I hacked the alarm by soldering a wire on the metal strip and soldering another wire to the motor case. I also bound a rubber band around the metal strip and clock motor so that the metal strip would make solid contact with the motor instead of vibrating.The hack worked quite well and I used it until my sophmore year in college. Sorry, I have no picture for it. I took it apart years ago and salvaged it for parts.Simple HacksIn college I replaced that old alarm clock with this tape deck:The tape deck had a great feature: it had a built in computer with an alarm clock. I just program the computer and at the desired time, it would turn on the tape deck and anything plugged into the power socket in the back of the deck. I used this feature a lot to record radio programs and record any albums they broadcast. Normally I had a light and radio hooked up and used it to wake me up every morning.One problem with the tape deck is the working lights were too bright. Not a problem normally but back in those days I wanted to listen to my music with the headphones on and the lights out. The lights from the tape deck were too bright to get in the mood.So I solved the problem by installing a simple switch:It was a simple hack but it saved me from a lot of grief.The tape deck worked great for about ten years until a couple power failures wrecked the computer. Fortunately, I still had my original hacked clock and I used that for a couple years until it finally died on me. Now I just use a regular alarm clock. :/ Perhaps I should build another hacked alarm clock.The radio I hooked up to my tape deck? It was from from my fathers office. He didn't need it anymore and he gave it to me. It worked pretty well but the sound from the internal speakers sucked. It didn't have external speaker plugs and so I hacked it! :)Here's a side shot of the radio:The stuff near the top is where I plugged the output of the tape deck. The squares below that are where the external speaker jacks used to be. I've since removed them for another hacking project.I performed another simple hack on the monitor for my first Atari ST. The sound from the speaker was lousy and so I drilled a hole in the monitor and connected a 1/4" headphone jack in the side:I had some external speakers from a tape recorder I bought a while back and connected them to the monitor. The sound was MUCH better! I performed a similar hack years earlier on an old B+W TV so that I could watch the TV with my headphones.Perhaps these simple hacks aren't much to brag about but they made my life easier at the time. They also remind me of how resourceful I was and recalling them is somewhat of an ego boast to me.These aren't all the hacks I've made, of course. I have many others to share and they are far more interesting then what I've shown already. These include hacks on my first Atari 400, my Timex-Sinclair computer and even on an old Big Trak tank I bought. Stay tuned.
  9. What are some of the really good hacks that have been done to the Lynxes over the years? Aside from the McWill LCD screen/VGA output, mosfet, etc? i guess I should also mention replacing the speaker too. I remember when Candle was working on an LCD replacement solution, he was discussing adding a Sega MegaDrive/Genesis compatible DB9 port. I've seen some battery replacement solutions and also even a video of someone adding Bluetooth audio to their Lynx [it was a video on YouTube and in French]. So what else has been done? If possible, share pics and links...to the modded Lynxes.
  10. Time to announce the Forth Round of the Harmony games: Colony 7 (as suguested by toymailman on AtariAge.com) This is Colony 7. Jarvian hostiles sighted inbound. Non combatant personnel are retreating to shuttle bay. We are preparing to defend position. City-wide shield is active. Gun emplacements are standing by. Special Weapon is primed. We will not retreat. We will survive. Your mission is to defend Colony 7 from the evil Jarvians. Wave after wave of enemy fighters strafe the Colony's defensive shield, attempting to break through. You're in command of the Colony's defensive guns, unleashing a converging stream of laser fire at the attacking hordes. You must wipe out the invading craft before either the cannons or the entire Colony are destroyed. Use your joystick to steer the targeting crosshairs around the screen. The defensive cannons will automatically fire salvo after salvo towards the current crosshair position. Your goal is to completely annihilate each attacking squadron, since even a single attacker breaking through can destroy your colony. If the situation seems desperate, hit the fire button to activate the Mega Blaster, your special weapon that, in one blast, will empty the sky. Use it sparingly. Each shot drains an entire Fuel Cell, of which the Colony has only three. If you succeed in destroying a squadron, it will soon be replaced a new, even more dangerous one. Four different types of enemies will attempt to destroy your colony! The Fighter is the most common element of the Javian fleet, and several of them will attack simultaneously, first blasting away the Colony's defensive shield and ultimately destroying the colony itself. They will also destroy your cannons if you are not careful. When The Advisor appears, it will guide the fighters faster to their targets, so destroy it quickly! The Bomber will launch a guided payload directly at one of your cannons, so you must be alert for its presence and if it succeeds in launching its bomb, destroy it before it reaches its target. And when The Scout enters your field of view it will call in replacement ships, so be sure to give it your utmost priority! Can you save Colony 7 from destruction? Colony 7 was created by Manuel Rotschkar, whose previous Atari 2600 homebrew games include Gunfight, Seawolf, Star Fire, and Crazy Balloon. Colony 7 is modeled after the 1981 arcade game of the same name. If you've ever played the arcade game, you'll appreciate how Manuel Rotschkar has recreated the frenetic energy of the original on the Atari 2600! down load the game here http://atariage.com/...areLabelID=2773 Good luck!! this round ends on June 6th (at the end of the round points will be awarded(10 (for first) to 2(for tenth) 1 for everybody after 10(any scores submitted after this round ends will be given 1 point) this is a simple game: with only one level guns are on austofire and fire is your smart bomb. (if you have hints feel free to post, and I might give you a bonus point) any scores for Hunchy II posted (for those who are not listed) will now count as one point Juno first scores will no longer be accepted!! (as always scores will only be upated on the webpage and AVC Forum(since I have no editing feature here) (you can also post scores on the AVC Forum as well just follow the instructions posted on the harmony games web page)
  11. The Seventh round of the 2013 Harmony Games as suggested by toymailman is Ultra SSCide SCSIcide is an original, fast-paced homebrew game released back in 2001 by Joe Grand of Pixels Past. In SCSIcide you play the role of a hard drive read head. As the different colored bits scroll by on the hard drive platter, you need to quickly read them in the correct order before you suffer a buffer underflow. As you complete each level, the data scrolls by more and more quickly! How far can you go? If you're a fan of Activision's Kaboom!, then you'll love SCSIcide. Joe Grand has spent some time recently updating SCSIcide and has released a new version of the game titled Ultra SCSIcide. This latest version of the game contains many improvements over the original: Added support for joystick controllers. Controller type is automatically detected when you press the paddle or joystick fire button to start the game. Fixed the flicker that used to occur at the beginning of each level. Changed background and data bit color palette to make bits easier to distinguish. Reduced track size from 10 to 8 bits, for a more appropriate one byte per level. Changed speed increase per level - only two random data bits increase in speed each level. Modified the sound and scoring routines to account for longer gameplay and higher levels. Changed title screen text and added GIS and Pixels Past logos. Added a PAL version of the game. (since this game has been used on Zero's High Score contest http://atariage.com/...de/#entry985874 we will use the same rules: Left Difficulty: B / Novice - Smaller Drive Head Right Difficulty: Your Choice Game Mode: Not Applicable) (scoring in this game is done Hexadecimal) little bonus for those who played this in Zero's 2600 HSC: if you beat the score you did in zeros I will give you 5 bonus points (this game is available to D/l http://atariage.com/...areLabelID=2704 or you can purchase it at the atari age store(if you don't have it already) this round ends August 31st Good luck (at the end of the round points will be awarded(10 (for first) to 2(for tenth) 1 for everybody after 10 (any scores submitted after this round ends will be given 1 point) as always scores will only be updated on the webpage and AVC Forum(since I have no editing feature here) (you can also post scores on the AVC Forum as well just follow the instructions posted on the harmony games web page)
  12. This is my Atari 400 computer:I bought it in, I think, 1983. It was the second computer I ever bought (the first was a COSMAC ELF single board computer I got in 1981). Man! What a difference! The ELf only had 256 bytes of memory and the Atari had 16K. The ELF had crappy B&W graphics and the Atari had full blown color graphics. I was thrilled. Along with the Atari I bought a cassette recorder, a BASIC cartridge. and a Defender cartridge. I already bought a color TV the year before (a 12" TV from Sears) and so I was ready to hook up the computer as soon as I got home.Not long after getting the Atari, I performed my first hack. The long RF cable attached to the back of the Atari was getting on my nerves. Whenever I moved the computer around I had to wrap it around the case and I was constantly tripping over the damned thing. It was pissing me off. So I rummaged through my electronics stuff, found the right parts and got to work. I popped off the case, cut the cord and soldered it to a female RCA plug I mounted on the case. Here is the result:I connected a male RCA plug to the cord I cut and it worked, more or less. A little flaky but it was fine until I acquired another RF cable.During my first year with the Atari I was either playing cartridge games or hand typing programs from magazines and saving them on cassette. That all changed when I got a well paying job in the late spring. A month later I had enough money to buy a disk drive and I bought the Astra 2000 dual floppy drive. The thing is, a 16K Atari 400 doesn't do so good with a disk drive. Alrhough I had enough money for a disk drive, I didn't have enough money for a disk drive AND an Atari 800. So the best alternative was a memory upgrade. The thing is, a memory upgrade on a 400 isn't a simple thing like that on an 800. You can't just replace boards, you have to hack the computer a little.So, once again, I cracked open the computer case. After that the first thing I did was pull out the old 16K RAM board and put in the new 64K board. I also pulled out a 16 pin chip in front of the RAM and replace it with a socket connected, via ribbon cable, to the 64K board. I wasn't done yet. There was one more part connected to the board that had to be soldered to the other side of the Atari's motherboard:Click here to see image.I put everything back together, hooked up the disk drive and tested it out. It worked just fine. The memory board even came with a sticker showing the graphic keys on the Atari keyboard. I put it on top of my 400 and it served me well over the years:Click here to see image. My psuedo-Atari 800 worked pretty much like the real 800 except for one thing: the keyboard. With the disk drive in place I was typing in even more programs from magazines and I was getting pretty tired of typing on that crappy membrane keyboard. Heck, I was tired of it the previous year when I typed in smaller programs and saved them on cassette. Other then buying an Atari 800, which I still couldn't afford, I couldn't figure out a solution to the problem. That is, I couldn't until I found this book in the bookstore:"The Creative Atari" by the editors of Creative Computing magazine. The book listed the best articles about Atari computers culled from their magazine during the past few years. The best article in the book was the one about replacing the membrane keyboard with a real keyboard. At last, my prayers were answered. I bought a decent keyboard from Jameco Electronics and started work right away. The first thing I did was connect a DB-25 plug to the keyboard pins on the Atari motherboard. It was impractical to remove and replace the old membrane keyboard because the new keyboard wouldn't fit into the case. That's why I had the DB-25 connector and I would plug in the new keyboard only when I needed it. When I was playing video games on the Atari, the new keyboard would be in the way and I would simply unplug it and put it away.Here's a shot of the DB-25 connected to the keyboard via ribbon cable:I didn't like having to stretch the cable across the width of the case but I had no choice: there was no room on the other side.Here are some detail shots of the solder work on the connector and the keyboard pins:Lots of connections, lots of soldering and many hours of work.Wiring the keyboard was a lot of work too. The diagram in the book laid out the wiring in a complicated grid pattern and I spent a lot of time testing the connections with a multimeter.I still needed buttons for the START, SELECT, OPTIONS and RESET keys and I solved that qucikly by cannabilizing a keyboard I got from mail order house (I originally planned to use this keyboard for my Atari but the Jameco one was a better fit).I decided to improve the keyboard design by adding a keypad. I already had a keypad built for another project and it was a simple matter to attach it to the other keyboard.Here's a picture of the completed keyboard without a case:As you can see, for the keys that didn't match the Atari layout, I stuck on some masking tape and wrote a label on them. Crude, but it did the job.Here's what the underside of the keyboard looks like:As you can see, the keypad is hooked up to a printed circuit board (PCB) and it's connected to the cable via an edge connector. Before my Atari project I etched the PCB myself and soldered the keypad to it. I can't remember what I originally planned the keypad for but I'm glad I did; it saved me a lot of time when I had to type in line numbers for the many BASIC programs I entered. Unfortunately I didn't have enough of the blank PCB for the main keyboard and I was too cheap to buy more. So I just hand wired the main keyboard.The case for the keyboard was made out of some scrap styrofoam I found. I improved it's looks by putting some wood grained contact paper on it. The finished product looked crappy and it was pretty flimsy but served my needs for two or three years until I bought an Atari 800 computer.The styrofoam case is long gone because I decided to replace the case with something more substantial. I found a couple keyboards at Goodwill and electronic surplus stores, gutted them and tried to install my keyboard. I wasn't too successful and I eventually gave up when I got the Atari 800.Here's a shot of the keyboard in the case that seemed to fit the best:Someday I might finish installing the keyboard in a different case (or build one myself) but I'm not highly moitivated at the moment.Overall I am quite satisfied with my Atari hacks. They allowed me to get a lot of use out of the computer without having to spend a lot of money.
  13. Today, I went with Lock 'N' Chase. This hack will give both players infinite lives. Be aware, there are two different versions of the game, so make sure you use the right one. More detailed instructions on how to enable hacks is available in the thread Vectron - No More Enemies. For the original version (without the proper copyright symbol): p 59cb 34 ; Both players never lose lives For the 8K version (with the proper copyright symbol): p 5c26 34 ; Both players never lose lives There are three sets of variables for such things as lives and the score: one for the active player, one for Player 1, and one for Player 2. When control switches to the other player, the "active player" variables are backed up for the player whose turn is ending, and the variables for the player whose turn is starting are written to the "active player" variables. This patch affects the "active player" lives counter, so it works for both players. There is only one drawback. The game loop continually watches to see if the active player's lives counter falls out of the range 1-9. If you reach 10 lives, the game ends immediately. I think you only gain a life at 20,000 points, and since you start with 5 lives, that means you have to roll the score over 4 times for that to happen. The score rolls over at 300,000 points, since it's a signed 16-bit variable with one padded zero (meaning it can't go higher than "327,670"). Now you can see all ten treasures, for those of us who couldn't make it to Level 10 up until now.
  14. The Eighth round of the 2013 Harmony Games as suggested by roadrunner is Hell-o-ween. This is Graphical Hack of Pitfall for 2600 so we will basicaly use the rules from Zero's 2600 HSC http://atariage.com/forums/topic/133058-hsc-season-6-week-7-pitfall Game Description: Halloween Pitfall! style! Things look very different in this Nightmarish Pitfall! Hack. All of the sprites have been changed to resemble "spooky" themed objects including bouncing Jack-o-lanterns, tombstones and chomping skulls. Even Pitfall Harry gets a horror make-over. you can d/l the game here in case of tie scores: best time left on the on clock determines ranking Bonus Points: Explorers club: Score 20,000 or more get 10 bonus points ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Perfect Game: score 114,000 get 20 bonus points (plus the Explorers club points) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- this round ends September 21st Good luck (at the end of the round points will be awarded(10 (for first) to 2(for tenth) 1 for everybody after 10 (any scores submitted after this round ends will be given 1 point) any scores for Ultra SScide posted (for those who are not listed) will now count as one point until Sept 7 then no more won't be accepted Next Game is to be chosen by Gorfy as always scores will only be updated on the webpage and AVC Forum(since I have no editing feature here) (you can also post scores on the AVC Forum as well just follow the instructions posted on the harmony games web page)
  15. Since I switched to Windows 10 (yes, I confess), it became more and more complicated to run my old 16-Bit CloneSpy program. So I adapted it to 32-Bit and now it works under Windows 10 too. Additionally I created a little program (CloneSpy2CSV) which converts the CloneSpy output (here based on the latest Atarimania ROM collection V11.0 minus multi game ROMs) into CSV-format (filename must be clones.txt!). So you can now load it into your favorite spreadsheet and format it there. Mine is LibreOffice (Clones*.ods), so I also attached my spreadsheet with some nice coloring (see example pic). Some results are quite interesting... EDIT: Added V2.3 with some bugfixes, now including results for homebrews until 2012 too. CloneSpy 2.0.zip CloneSpy V2.3.zip
  16. Time to announce the Fifth Round of the Harmony games: Laserman 2k3 This our second Special Game as it will be featured for the Video Game Summit. Laserman 2k3 a hack of Keysonte Kapers for the 2600, where you as Laserman have to chase and catch your arch enemy Dr.X before he escapes his lab while avoiding obstacles like missiles, robots and bombs. Laserman 2k3 was made public on AtariAge.com on June 30th,2003 making it's 10th year anniversary. (first public showing at VGS '04 on emulator, second showing in cart form in VGS'05 So this Round won't offically start until June 30th. and will end July 22nd you can download the game here: http://www.atariage.com/hack_page.html?SystemID=2600&SoftwareHackID=138 (at the end of the round points will be awarded(10 (for first) to 2(for tenth) 1 for everybody after 10(any scores submitted after this round ends will be given 1 point) As mentioned above this game will be a special game, if an online score beats the live score at VGS'13 a prize will be given (for those in the US, an E-certifiacte to the AVC NewsStand at cafepress.com(25.00) and a digital copy of the VGS Program, for those overseas, A digital copy of VGS Program only(since charges are higher for shipping at cafepress as well not being available in some countries the e-cert is only for US players) Good Luck!!
  17. Reggie is back to show more Reproductions, Home-brew original & Hacked games for retro consoles! A big shoutout to AtariAge in this video! Games Shown: Halo 2600 (2600) Space Rocks (2600) Mother 3 (GBA) Monster World IV (Genesis) Nightmare Busters (SNES) Twinkle Tale (Genesis) Falldown (2600) Juno First (2600) Flappy (2600) Hebereke (NES) Crisis Force (NES) Game Panic (2600) Road Warriors (2600)
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