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Found 19 results

  1. I have an Epson PC286C that I wanted to restore but I simply have too many systems needing restoration and the back log is out of hand. So, I'm parting with this NEC PC98 clone. Cool looking machine and was billed as an Amiga killer in Japan. lol. The NEC PC98 has a huge library of coolr games. If you love restoring machines, this is one to get: https://www.ebay.com/itm/263394723135 Also, I have an MSX machine (fully working) https://www.ebay.com/itm/263390094541 (and load of MSX games for sale too) and a Captain Phasma TRS-80 Color Computer 2 https://www.ebay.com/itm/263382550254 Thanks all and Happy Holidays to you, your family and your vintage machine!
  2. Hello! I recently got a CoCo 1 and have been trying to get it load programs via a Cassette cable I bought off Ebay. Here's how it goes: I load the .wav file onto the device. I get the wav files from here: http://www.colorcomputerarchive.com/coco/Cassettes/Games/ I connect the device via the cable to the device. I type 'CLOAD' (or CLOADM, as applicable) and then that little prompt in the corner comes up. I press play. It blinks. It gets the correct name of the program. It appears to be loading. The recording stops. The little light blinks: 'OK' it says. Now when I type 'Run', nothing happens. I type 'List' and there's no program loaded. It's like it wasn't loading anything at all. :-/. What's going on? How can I potentially fix it? I've tried various volume levels but that doesn't seem to matter. I KNOW it's loading /something/ because it's detecting the name of the program while it loads. :-/.
  3. Finally picked up a FreHD for my Model III and it's definitely a slick piece of hardware. Right off it needed a case and the generic Chinese wall-wart needed to go. Decided I wanted something that would look period correct for a TRS-80. Set the Wayback machine to 1973 and picked up this nice case from Radio Shack. Used a cutting wheel on a Dremel for the SD slot and then finished with a file. The Read/Write/Power LED holes were done with a Whitney Punch and the holes covered from behind with a white translucent tape for a finished look. Also put a divider between the board LEDs so there's no light bleed between them. Added a nice Mean Well power supply and switched the line voltage so the power supply is dead when turned off...also used a grounded line cord. Really happy with how everything fit up just right. The face is pretty much a dead on match for the battleship grey and the black sides match the disk drives and keyboard. Originally I put in a blue LED for the power indicator but realized blue LEDs didn't exist until around 1990, so I put in a red one. And yes...you need a key to fire it up!
  4. People can have problems narrowing down to 'just one' favorite game of all time, so this thread is a bit of a cop-out... you can narrow it down to TWO instead! So, after all these years, which two TRS-80 Model I or III games do you think were the best? You can break it down even further into sub categories if you have a hard time pinning it down to even two overall programs. For shooters, I'm thinking Robot Attack and Meteor Mission 2. For a BASIC text based game I liked Hammurabi. Agree? Disagree? What do you think? Maybe you'll change our minds?
  5. From the album: My Game Collection

    I recently Acquired this one from a friend, through some trading. It has some slight yellowing, but not too much. It came with a floppy drive controller. (Apr, 22, 2018)
  6. From the album: My Game Collection

    1983 Tandy Radio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer 2 in the box.
  7. I just bought this unit today. It is an original 4K version of the Color Computer 1. After fiddling with the inner RF box, I finally got a nice picture and the unit does seem pretty much untouched, even though the tamper sticker and screw under it was missing. I've tried a few cartridges I had laying around, but so far it doesn't want to play them. At most I get garbage on the screen or just a green screen, even after cleaning a few times. I'm hoping it's just a case the carts I am trying are too big for this unit's 4K of RAM. I have a slightly later unit with the 32K of RAM, but I always figured I would pick up an early 4K version if I found one in decent shape. And yes, it is only running Color Basic 1.0!
  8. I just finished reading "CoCo: The Colorful History of Tandy's Underdog Computer" by Boisy Pitre and Bill Loguidice. About two months ago, I knew very little about the history of the Tandy/Radio Shack (TRS) line of computers. What I did know, was basically gleamed from browsing the Radio Shack catalogs in the late 1970s and early 1980s that my amateur radio licensed father would receive in the mail and seeing them on display at the local Radio Shack store (sadly, now closed) in the Ocean County Mall. I did spend an inordinate amount of time during my high school years using a TRS-80 computer, albeit remotely, as my favorite go-to BBS growing up was the JSTBBS (Jersey Shore Telecommunication Breadboard System) running on a TRS-80. Fast forward to Vintage Computer Festival East 10 in April 2015, where my wife Lucy and I (ok, mostly me) had an Atari 8-bit Home Computer display setup. Boisy Pitre stopped by our exhibit and we talked about vintage computers and Atari. He told me about his Liber809 product which is a Motorola 6809 upgrade for the Atari 8-bit computes. He also mentioned his book "CoCo: The Colorful History of Tandy's Underdog Computer", which I told him I would read. While I was looking for "CoCo: The Colorful History of Tandy's Underdog Computer" on Amazon, I came across "Priming the Pump: How TRS-80 Microcomputer Enthusiasts Helped Spark the PC Revolution" by David and Theresa Welsh. I decided to read "Priming the Pump" first since it went back to the beginning of the history of the Tandy/Radio Shack (TRS) line of computers. Once I completed "Priming the Pump", I ordered and read "CoCo: The Colorful History of Tandy's Underdog Computer". These two books cover much of the history of the Tandy/Radio Shack (TRS) line of computers. "Priming the Pump" comes across as two disjointed repetitive autobiographies merged together with the early history of microcomputers, it does provide some insight into running an early software business by the seat of your pants. Boisy's book is a well researched and his passion for the brand really shine through. He provides great detail on the cast of characters around the development of the TRS Color Computer models and related technologies as well as the leaders in the CoCo user community from the beginning through to the early 2000s. He also provides insight into the goings on at Tandy/Radio Shack corporate. I read the printed book which has many black and white photographs. I believe that the eBook version has color photographs. I actually used YouTube to go view some of the Color Computer demos, demos, demos that were mentioned toward the end of the book. I enjoyed reading this book, it has a lot of great early computer history. Regards, Bill
  9. Most people getting back into the TRS-80, are without decent reference materials... This thread is for users to post and download copies or re-creations of manuals, tutorials or reference cards. If you have anything that you think others could use, learn or benefit from, please post it here. To start this thread off, I've attached a recreation of the TRSDOS 1.3 Reference Guide. COVER INSIDE While the whole thing is 22 pages, in book form it only uses six sheets of paper. TRSDOS 1-3 REFERENCE GUIDE.pdf
  10. Everything was sold. A family member recently passed and so i inherited a ton of computer equipment... It has been sitting on a desk untouched for around 30 years since it was last used. I'm looking to sell it all together, though it doesn't matter to me too much. I'm perhaps looking for around 150$ for everything. Considering i can't promise it will work, and some of it is as it was left on the desk (Printer cover is heavily coated in dust, Games are still in Multi-Pak interface), i think this is a reasonable price. The two mini computers are in exceptional condition though, and the Micro Color Computer MC-10 is still in the plastic (Don't know if it was used, and i haven't tested it, but its in extremely good condition aesthetically and it has extra modules in their boxes still.) There is a slight yellowing on the computer equipment (besides the graphic printer), though I've heard that can be cleaned up. I am willing to ship the items, though it will have to be worked out according to location... There is alot of items. (So far shipping to NC, TN, and Pittsburgh, PA cost around 150-200$ for UPS shipping, USPS doesn't have a big enough box for the monitor in height and says it could cost 100$ for each package. ) (the box of magazines weights 60 pounds, i could perhaps let you choose a few magazines and put them in with the computer to cut shipping costs) if you are in PA i'd be willing to meet halfway and exchange it at a police station. I live in the US, in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Items: MAGNAVOX Color Monitor 40 TRS-80 94K Color Computer 2 (With dust cover) TRS-80 Micro Color Computer MC-10 (In box, 16K Ram, Manual) Timex Sinclair 1000 (In Box, Manual) Color Graphic Printer (With Cover) TRS-80 Printer (With Cover, Extremely dusty (Wasn't dusted like everything else) (there is extra paper and ink, and there was a couple of files printed that contained a adventure game written in basic) Deluxe Joystick Color Mouse (I believe i also grabbed the mouse pad and threw it in a box along with some cassettes on the bottom, not positive on that though, and the mouse pad does have yellowing) TRS-80 Touch Pad Multi-Pak Interface for Color Computer Books & Magazines on Basic Programming and Electrical Engineering (Not sure how many books are in with it, its mostly magazines) (Fills up a 2 foot long and 1 foot high box, and weights 60 pounds) 16k Ram module, Games, Direct Connect Modem Pak, Speech-Sound Pak Card, Color Scripsit, Speculator, Cassetes, (25* cassettes (4-5 with programs written, most of them still wrapped in plastic and sitting in the container), 4 games (most likely more burried in one of the boxes) (Tandy Tetris, Super Logo, Edtasm+, Tandy Silpheed) (Some of the magazines are damaged, such as pages torn or the covers ripped off, they where lying on the ground under the desk in a unorganized pile) Science Fair Microcomputer Trainer (No box, Manual is a bit dusty (Fully put together)... Underside of it in the area where the speaker is has a cobweb hanging off it, but otherwise no damage) (there is a few pieces of paper with assembly code hand-written, i hear that the trainer didn't have memory, so the programs had to be written down and put in.) I can send photos if you ask. List of magazines (And the few books that are mixed in):
  11. I've been giving a lot of thought to the early 8-bit home computers lately. Although our family bought the original 1977 Atari Heavy Sixer video-game console; for computers, I found myself drawn to the TRS-80. Its monochrome text display (...okay, I didn't know it was simply a black-and-white RCA television) seemed to make it more of a "real" computer than something you "hooked up to your television". But then again, the video-display terminal was at that time, still a relatively new development. I haven't been able to track down the price of a DEC VT52 computer terminal when it was introduced in 1975, but the 1980 price was still over $1,300. So in 1977, when Radio Shack and Commodore offered complete computer systems for under $1,000 including video monitors, it was quite remarkable. I wandered into a computer store in early 1981 and the sales associate demonstrated how the Atari 800 could start a program instantly, like "Star Raiders" on cartridge, instead of having to wait for a slow floppy-drive or even slower cassette. Still, it made me wonder if an Atari computer wasn't so much a computer that used cartridges, as much as it was a cartridge-based video-game system that had a computer keyboard. Later that year, I visited that same store when the IBM 5150 "PC" came out, and noted that to put together a whole PC "system" - with floppy drives, monitor, keyboard, RAM, and power-supply (...yes, sold separately), you were looking at more like $4,000 (To be fair, Radio Shack's 1981 Model II "business computer" had a price tag close to that, and they offered a letter-quality daisy-wheel printer that cost almost $2,000 all by itself; pages 172-173). I've been fooling around with the VICE Commodore emulator, as well as the C64 Forever free-version (...which appears to be an enhanced setup/front-end to VICE, with some bundled software titles). Again - it "feels" more like a game machine than an actual computer. That seems to be echoed in the decision to market the C64 Direct-to-TV as a joystick plug-and-play device for games, instead of something with a keyboard. I feel a little bit sad that Commodore's 80-column 8-bit business machines never gained traction; I think they could have offered small-businesses computing power at half the price of what IBM and even the early PC clones provided, if they could have gotten the marketing right. But I can't feel too sad for the company that had the best-selling computer of all time in the C-64. Jack Tramiel is such a polarizing figure; I can't say whether he saved Atari or ruined it - or perhaps he was just trying to run it as best he could, while the world was moving on. Radio Shack computers suffered a similar fate and now the Radio Shack brand itself is on its last legs. The irony is that I think the Coleco Adam could have been the most useful home computer of that era, if they hadn't failed in the execution. Having a letter-quality printer at the center of their strategy was actually brilliant in the argument for "this machine can help your kids with their homework". This was happening near the end of an era where there were girls at college supplementing their income by typing term papers for the guys, because typing "wasn't something that men did". Being a typist was a specialized skill. The typewriter wasn't nearly as forgiving as the word-processor and noticing a mistake in the middle of a typed-page meant doing the whole thing all over again. I've been thinking about and working on this post over the course of hours and I've gone back and made revisions repeatedly - this would have been much more difficult if I had to resort to typing on a typewriter or writing it out long-hand. And without the Internet, and the AtariAge website, how would I share it? Another curiosity - or maybe an irony; the computer I'm using is hooked up to a TV... ...a 22" 1080p HDTV that I'm using for a monitor. And my primary use for this machine is entertainment; playing classic games via emulation, watching video content and social networking. So it seems that I've come full-circle; I have a computer, in my home - a "home computer", that's hooked up to my TV. Through the magic of emulation, I can experience owning an entire collection of technology from the past; home computers, game consoles, coin-op arcade machines, and libraries of software that if tallied up at their original selling prices, would be worth tens of thousands of dollars. It's a nice escape from a world filled with violence, injustice, strife and unrest. I'd enjoy reading your thoughts on the matter...
  12. Androne Demon Attack Don Pan Dragonfire Math Tutor Mindroll (Coco 3 Version) Rampage Thanks
  13. Like the title says. Does anybody know of a label variation guide for Color Computer cartridges? I collect the earlier CoCo 1 carts with the title in a colored bar next to a TRS-80 logo. I know many CoCo 1 carts also came in a plain white "Tandy" end label variation, and I've got a few of those that I'm looking to swap out for the earlier style. But, I'm not certain if they all even exist. (Specifically, I'm talking about Dungeons of Daggorath, Downland, Stellar Life Line, and Demolition Derby. I know I've seen the first three in the "TRS-80" variation, but I don't know about Demo Derby.)
  14. From the album: My Game Collection

    Another shot of the 64K Tandy CoCo 2 I recently acquired (April 22, 2018)
  15. I have a interesting mix of items for sale. Right now, I have a CoCo and a TI994A. In a few days, I'll have an additional CoCo and TI994A for sale as well, so keep your eyes on all four. In addition, I have a bunch of games I picked up in Japan. CoCo Hardware TRS-80 Color Computer 2 (With a Hitachi CPU) Joysticks Joysticks with Rapid Fire RS232 Model should work on other 8bit machines Texas InstrumentsTI99/4A Bandai WonderSwan Games Final Fantasy WS Wonder Swan (JAPAN) #SquareSoft Puyo Puyo (TSU) WonderSwan Vaitz Blade WonderSwan (RPG) Hataraku Chocobo WonderSwan Twin Bee Konami Soccer ( Futbol / Football ) Exciting Baseball Twin Bee (Twinbee) (duplicate game) MSX Games Color Midway Mini Golf MSX Baseball Championship Soccer ( Futbol / Football ) by Pony Canyon Tomy Pyuta Games (VERY RARE, they usually go for $80 each) BOMBMAN Scramble Happy to combine shipping on anything or answer questions. Cheers!
  16. Back in the 'good ole days' the early consumer computers were relatively expensive, and since some companies foresaw a larger profit margin they used premium parts. Later to be more competitive with other companies the prices fell and profit margins shrank, many companies began to 'cut corners' with re-designs for fewer components, or just plain inferior parts. At the time a computers life was about 18 months to obsolescence, so if the computer only had to last 2 years or so, who would know how cheaply the thing was put together? I'd like to see a discussion of the computers that have endured the decades. Have the earlier models fared better than the later built models? Have some brands/manufactures lasted longer without intervention? For instance on the TI-99/4A the earlier built black & silver models had mechanical switches in their keyboards and they have endured to this day, but the later price-reduced membrane keyboards have pretty much all died. I'd like to hear YOUR PERSONAL EXPERIENCE with YOUR BRAND of early brand of computers. I'm basically trying to target the 1980-85 years. So if you have a TRS-80, an Apple, a Commodore, a TI-99/4A or one of the others let's hear it!
  17. Hello AtariAge Community! Up for grabs on Ebay right now is my TRS-80 Model I (level 1). It's date of manufacture is 1978. Pretty old right? eBay Auction -- Item Number: 281117901927 Here is a short video of it I posted on Youtube: https://www.youtube....h?v=scRQYEnGyrU If you're interested please feel free to check it out and bid! -Xfacter
  18. Just wondering if any body had an idea what wrong with the display on this TRS-80 Model 4 I just got yesterday. While I've played with electronics all my life, CRT's are a little out of my league. I'm wondering if it's a bad capacitor or something. some times it fast rolls, the weird diagonal lines are always there as you can see in the video. I haven't test the floppies yet, got to get some Model 4 boot disk.. which could be a challenge. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA82fPno-6o
  19. Ever wanted to try out a computer that you never owned? Want to play an old game you remember from your youth? Thinking about getting back into the REAL DEAL, but want to play around first? Want to play a video game at work on your lunch break? This thread is for links to all those different EMULATORS available online. If you know of one not yet listed, please post it, with any comments you think we should know about. TRS-80 Model III << HERE >> TI-99/4A << HERE >> (This one is EXCELLENT) BBC Micro Computer << HERE >> Commodore 64 << HERE >> (If you know of a better one, let us know)
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