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Found 14 results

  1. From the album: Arcade

    I own Arcade Scramble boards

    © 2016

  2. I'm looking to resurrect some of my attempts at Aquarius programming and seeing a activity on the ZX81 recently there is some mileage in lowres pixel style games. Is anyone planning or working on anything at the present?
  3. On March 26, 2018, I posted the following message to the BallyAlley Yahoo group: Is anyone interested in having a programming contest for the Astrocade? My ideas: 1) Program in machine language or BASIC 2) Short programs for a start 3) Program of any kind (game, demo, music, video art, etc). 4) Prize? I've no idea. Does anyone want to give this a go? Adam ----------------- David Dibbern responded with: My skills were fair back in The day, but I would be interested in a retro port contest. A contest to make any retro arcade game that was not already done for the Bally, ported over . I would even pay pal $10 for starting a prize fund for this. We could get some cool retro games that we wanted to see ported but didn’t ever make it to the Astrocade Thanks- Dave ----------------- Thomas Burtell said: This would be very interesting! Programming has changed so much over the years and we all have gotten better. I'm focusing on other stuff right now, but I'd definitely like to see this Bally-battle. It's like what they do on StackExchange with "Code Golf". You have to write the tightest code with the minimal of resources. ... back to lurking. ----------------- Is anyone here on AtariAge interested in a programming contest for the Astrocade, either in BASIC or machine language? Adam
  4. I added an in-progress Z80 disassembly of Gorf to BallyAlley.com. You can download it here: http://www.ballyalley.com/ml/ml_source/ml_source.html#GorfArcadeDisassembly Here are some additional details about the game: Gorf, is a fixed space shooter arcade game with five different screens. Jay Fenton designed and programmed Gorf for DNA (Dave Nutting Associates). It was published by Midway in 1981. Like Wizard of War, The Adventures of Robby Roto! (and others), Gorf uses what has been dubbed the "astrocade chipset". In 2018, Jamie Fenton (formally Jay Fenton) donated documentation and hardware items to the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. This included Gorf source code and other documentation related to the game. Gorf was not written in machine language, it was written in a Forth-like language called TERSE (Terse Efficient Recursive Stack Engine) that was developed at DNA. After the TERSE source code for Gorf became available, David Turner, an avid fan of the game, began to use the game's source code to disassemble Gorf and comment it. Details of his work, as well as his in-progress Z80 disassembly for Gorf is in this archive. In Dave's notes, he refers to TERSE and Gorf related documents which are available at the BitSavers archive, here: http://bitsavers.org/pdf/nuttingAssoc/ In July of 2017, I reviewed the Gorf arcade game: It's great that the recent archiving of the TERSE source code for Gorf is already bearing fruit. Adam
  5. The interface for a good assembler is just like a text editor, with extra features added to make assembly easier. Take a look at this simulated screenshot, inspired by the Apple ][. This is a multiply routine for the Motorola 68000: There are several things that would make this more of an assembler than a word processor: Under the label "Multiply," there is a blue line stretching across the screen. You could toggle this on or off. Under this line can be shown information about the subroutine (e.g. input/output). Each line of code is indented automatically. The local labels have a period before them, and are not indented. There is a red "+" before the label. Clicking it changes it to a "-" and makes the code disappear. You could click the "-" to make the code reappear. Whether the code is folded or not, it's compiled when requested. When compiled, the branches with the ".s" extension will resolve to a ".b" (8-bit) or ".w" (16-bit) displacement, whichever is the shortest possible. If the extension is left off, assume it to be ".s". That way, you don't have to figure it out yourself. In this example, the screen is 480x360 pixels. Characters are 7 pixels across and 8 pixels down, just like on the Apple ][. In system RAM, this could be handled with one table telling which ASCII character to show (one byte per character), and another table to tell the background/foreground colors for each cell (in each byte, there are 4 bits for background color and 4 bits for background color). By default, the line under labels is enabled, tab width is 8 characters, lines after labels and code automatically indent, and code is not folded. When a mouse is used, the character that the mouse is pointing to is shown in a different color (for example, in the above screen, it would be shown as a white cell with a blue character). Characters would be stored as ASCII. The blue underline is toggled on/off with a control byte, and the tab width is also controlled using a certain byte. You could use any programming language you want, be it 6502, 68K, Z80, BASIC, etc. Regarding the keyboard, there could be additional keys based on what programming language you use. In addition to a regular ASCII keyboard, there could be attachments you could just snap on. For example, a 6502 keyboard attachment might have buttons labeled "LDA," "STA," "CLC," "SEC," "ADC," and "SBC." Next, I'll mention some enhancements you could make to the screen.
  6. PONG-BOY 1

    DSCN3783

    From the album: pongboy

    Z80 and items
  7. Here's a system you don't see everyday on eBay... Selling my Japanese NEC PC6001 computer. This machine was released in the states as NEC Trek. It has a Z80 and Motorola 6847 video chip (like the TRS-80 Color Computer). The sound is via a General Instruments. Comes in the original box. http://r.ebay.com/Gfj6l0
  8. Has anyone ever tried to run some of the modern CPU benchmarks (like SPECint and SPECfp) on the classic 8-bit (6502, Z80) and 16-bit (68000, 65816) CPUs? My googling has found nothing. (Only thing I could find was a rating for the 68060.) How hard would it be to set something like that up?
  9. Why did the Game Boy use a Z80 instead of a 6502 like the NES (and the closely related 65816 of the SNES)? Were there any power advantages to the Z80 that would help with battery life? Wouldn't it have made more sense to use a 6502, than they could reuse code and make it easier to port NES games over.
  10. This next section is a big one. Wouldn't it be great if you could test code as you programmed it? Well that's where Code-As-You-Go comes into play. The mode can be accessed with a dedicated button on a keyboard. It's labeled "CAYG." Take a look at this: That's the code as you go screen. On the panel at the right, you can enter the data you want to test. On the upper right of the screen is the address that the code will assemble to. In this example, the written code will compile at address $001404. You could instead have it display which line of the source code the code will go in. First, give the subroutine a name. In this example, we have a routine called "TetrisLFSR." This will be a Motorola 68000 version of the NES Tetris RNG routine. The NES version of Tetris iterates its RNG (a 16-bit LFSR) in the following manner: Set the output bit to the XOR of bits 1 and 9, and right-shift that input into the RNG. We will replicate this routine as we enter the code. For this test, enter the input in d0. We need to enter a 16-bit value. Using a mouse, click on the fourth-to-last digit of the d0 register, then type "7259." The digit highlighted in green is the cursor. Note that the register values are displayed in hexadecimal. If you enter an invalid hexadecimal digit, nothing happens. When you enter the last digit, the cursor stays there. (If it were an A-register, the cursor would be red.) Now, time for the first instruction. Type "move.b", tab, then "d0,d2", and hit Enter (if you hit Space, it will tab for you). When you press Enter, the last line of code you wrote is automatically executed in the CAYG window, and its machine language code appears in the window as well. In M68K assembly, the instruction "move.b d0,d2" is represented by $1400. The screen looks like this: Note that after you typed the code line, that instruction automatically executed. The last byte of d0 is $59, so the last byte of d2 is now also $59. The next two instructions are "move.w d0,d1" and "lsr.w #8,d1". These are necessary to retrieve the upper byte of a 16-bit value in d1. After the second line was typed, d1 became $7259. After the third line, it became $0072. In the machine code box is E049, which is the code for "lsr.w #8,d1." Remember, only the compiled code for the last line you typed appears in the machine code box. Next, we want to take the XOR of bits 1 and 9 of the bytes in d1 and d2. Since 1 and 9 differ by exactly 8, no shifting of either byte is needed. Just XOR the bytes by typing "eor.b d2,d1", then pressing Enter. Register d1 is now equal to $2B, which is the XOR of $72 and $59. It is bit 1 from this value we need to extract and get into the X (extend) flag. To do this, type "lsr.b #2,d1", and press Enter. The value in d1 became $0A. But more importantly, look at the X and C flags. They lit up, so their value is 1. Any flag that is clear appears as white-on-black, while a set flag is indicated by the opposite color scheme. Since the XOR of bits 1 and 9 of our 16-bit value was 1, a 1 will be right-shifted in to get the new RNG value. Here is the last piece of the puzzle. Now that we have our output bit in X (and C), we can use a "roxr" instruction to shift it in. Type "roxr.w #1,d0", and hit Enter. And there you have it. The new RNG value is $B92C. With the ability to see the code execute as you type it, coding will become as easy as pie. You could also toggle register updating off/on, and you could also move your cursor to any line in the code, and press a certain button to step through the code and see the results. After finishing the code, press the CAYG button again. All the code you wrote in the CAYG screen will be placed at the place in the source code you were at when you went to this screen. You can then edit it, delete it, or change it as normal. All in all, the code-as-you-go feature could be a breakthrough for future assemblers. No matter whether it's 6502, M68K, Z80, or anything else, it's the next innovation in coding.
  11. Hi folks I recently picked up an Amstrad CPC464 to add to my collection (while my first computer was a Atari 65XE, I'd been playing around on someone else's CPC for some time before I got the Atari, so it was that which introduced me to home computing in the first place). However, it's not booting up properly so I'm now off in search of some Amstrad forums for advice on getting it up and running again. In the meantime, though, I was curious as to whether any AtariAgers are using CPCs as well. If so, how are you getting on with them?
  12. The vast majority of the systems in the late 70s and early 80s were built around these 8-bit CPUs. Could anyone with programming or engineering experience from that era chime in with what some of the advantages and disadvantages or each chip were? Which do you think was better? For computing? For gaming? Here's a quick list that I can think of. Please correct me where I'm wrong and add your own that I've missed. Z80: Adam/ColecoVision Sega SG-1000 Sega Master System MSX most early arcade games Game Boy Game Gear Astrocade (Also listed as a coprocessor on many 16-bit arcades/consoles) 6502: Atari 2600 Atari 8-bit computers/5200 Apple II NES/Famicom Atari Lynx Commodore 64 PC Engine/TurboGrafx 16/Duo/Express The Commodore 128 was unique in that it had both a Z80 and a 6502. And what ever happened to Zilong and MOS? Why were they never able to translate their success in the 8-bit market over into the 16-bit market and beyond?
  13. Can someone confirm the correct specifications for the ColecoVision and the SG-1000? Both of these systems have varying specification listings on the web. However, as a ColecoVision owner since day one, I know its specs as: ColecoVision (1982) CPU: 8-bit Z80A (3.58MHz) RAM: 1 KB Video RAM: 16 KB Video Display Processor: Texas Instruments TMS9928A Colors: 16 Sprites: 32 Resolution: 256x192 pixels Sound: TI SN76489AN. Channels: 3-tone, 1-noise As for the SG-1000 (1983), I'm pretty sure it's the same. However, I see some reports claiming that the SG-1000 has 2 KB of RAM and 16 KB of VRAM. Others claim that it has 1 KB of RAM (like the CV). I tend to think the specs between the two machines are actually the same -- except for the system ROM and the memory maps.
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