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Found 49 results

  1. Well, this was a surprise. Found this bugger in a lot of 10 games for 20 bucks. You can still see where the proto label was before it fell off. Amusingly, the previous owner, "TIM", had a piece of scotch tape with his name written on the front (as many other games in the lot did) but it was easy enough to remove without damaging that shiny red label. 999% likely a review copy/final rom but still crazy to bump into. Figured I'd post here as well in case there's anything I'm missing about this that I should check for differences, and just to show that it exists!
  2. Yes, yet another Activision versus Atari blog entry! I read DoctorSpud's recently on Robot Tank and it reminded me of how this was Activision's version of Battlezone. DoctorSpud also made a comparison of how Enduro was their take on Pole Position. So I started thinking of how many times that happened. Most of us know of the lawsuit that Atari initiated against Activision and we also know that Imagic was sued over Demon Attack being close to Phoenix. I get it, they paid top dollar for a license of an arcade game and someone does a knock-off on their platform. We also have to consider where the limits are. Is every maze game a rip-off of Pac-Man? Video Checkers (Atari, 1980) vs Checkers (Activision, 1980) These games were even lame when they first released. Who went to the department store or TV place to buy a game and came out with Checkers? I doubt either decided to rip the other off. Checkers falls in between tic-tac-toe and the much more complex chess. It seems like someone's initiation on basic graphics, stored data in arrays, and some basic AI. Video Checkers was done by Carol Shaw who as everyone knows did the amazing River Raid and spanned the vertical scroller genre. Verdict: Doubtful. A common game and not really a best seller for either company. Tennis (Activision, 1981) vs Realsports Tennis (Atari, 1983) Activision's Tennis is one of the most fun sports games on the 2600. Simple control and a good AI. Atari decided to re-do all their sports games properly with the Realsports series. Tennis was bound to be picked since it would be easier to implement a two character game and keep it pretty authentic. Verdict: Doubtful. Atari certainly decided to do a better tennis game but the enhancements are big enough to dispute. As far as, game mechanics goes, the principles are the same but the game is not original and can only be done in a certain way. Pole Position (Atari, 1983) vs Enduro (Activision, 1983) Two great games. The Namco arcade game was massive and the Atari licensed version was pretty good all things considered. A good seller and very common, capturing the essence and play mechanics very well. Enduro is also an amazing game and brings up some original items. The typical scoring system implemented in most games especially Atari arcade ones, is implemented in Enduro instead as trying to last as long in the 5 day race. Verdict: Inspired. Enduro borrowed enough from Pole Position (and possibly other games) to generate its own version but game play and objectives is different enough. Star Raiders (Atari, 1982) vs Starmaster (Activision, 1982) In the beginning of the video and arcade game industry, there were only so many ideas around. At the end of the day, you can only show a starship's view with a cross hair and stars in the background. These two came out in the same year, but it's certain that the 8-bit computer version Star Raiders had been seen by Alan Miller (especially since he was a former Atari employee himself). Verdict: Inspired. Many, many similarities but it's unlikely that Starmaster was created based on Atari's 2600 version, most likely that was the Atari 400/800 version. Space Invaders (Atari, 1978) vs Megamania (Activision, 1982) Space Invaders was really the most important shoot-em up at the time and what made a lot of people buy the 2600 to begin with, probably their best value from the license obtained from Taito. Megamania was one of the few shoot-em ups from Activision and really the only one that matches that genre the best. Verdict: Inspired. Megamania added a new elements such as varied enemy movement, enemy types and the energy bar to be different enough. The 3-4 years was a long enough to allow Atari to profit significantly. Decathlon (Activision, 1983) vs Track & Field (Atari, 1983) Two games released in time to cash into the Los Angeles 1984 Olympics. Lots of events to add some variety and the skill level centred around your ability to wiggle (or bash buttons) quickly. I mentioned it many times, I love T&F and which is why I love Decathlon. Verdict: Coincidence. Decathlon was released in March 1983 which means it would have started development in early or mid 1982. T&F made it to stores for Xmas 1983 and the arcade version was available earlier in the same year only. Chances are both games were developed in parallel. Defender (Atari, 1981) vs Chopper Command (Activision, 1982) I think we can all agree that CC is the vastly superior game of these two. Atari could not have been too pleased when this came out after licensing Defender from Williams. This one of the games when I realized as a kid that these companies were copying each other. Verdict: Ripped off. And we're much better for it since CC plays much better and is visually stunning. Gameplay is just too similar for it to be a coincidence. Battlezone (Atari, 1983) vs Robot Tank (Activision, 1983) Two tank games released at the same time. Battlezone had been doing its rounds in the arcade and was quite popular there. Such a unique scenario and such a similar execution. One could argue that a 1st-person Combat game could only be done in one way really. Verdict: Ripped off. RT actually exceeds Battlezone in terms of gameplay, and it seems obvious that both came from the arcade version. I can't fault Activision for trying to do a type of game better if they had the ideas and more importantly the ability to execute. I'm very happy that all these titles exist and that both companies defined how games should be done and laid the foundation of everything else that came after. If you come up with an original idea like Warlords, River Raid, Adventure, Pitfall, Yar's Revenge, or Keystone Kapers once in your life, then you have accomplished something very special.
  3. From the album: Activision Patch Illustrations

    A digital art recreation of the Space Shuttle Pilot achievement patch offered by Activision.

    © Illustration by The Eyeball Mural, no rights reserved. Activision intellectual properties belong to Activision Blizzard.

  4. SavyIsJoshoArts

    Oink! PAL

    From the album: Atari 2600 Gameplay on YPbPr Component

    High Score on Activision's Oink! Played on my Atari 2600 4-Switch Woodgrain Console modded using TimWorthington's 2600RGB Mod showing it in YPbPr Component Video Output.

    © SavyIsJoshoaArts aka Activision Man

  5. From the album: Atari 2600 Gameplay on YPbPr Component

    My high score on Activision's H.E.R.O. played on my woodgrain 4-Switch Atari 2600 using YPbPr Component Video Output.

    © SavyIsJoshoArts aka Activision Man

  6. From the album: My Collection

    The label Was glued on upside down. How does that happen?
  7. Hello! Atari 8-bit user here. I do have a copy minus manual of ACTIVISION's ZENJI for the Coleco Colecovision. If interested, please PM me. I'm shipping from Southern California so, stateside, shipping should be around the $10-$12 mark when properly packed. International Shipping is around $20 based on my latest shipment to Europe. Thank you, AKD.
  8. "I'd certainly nominate [The Dreadnaught Factor] for remake status. With some visual upgrades, it would make a great XBLA download." -IGN Review "A cheapo remake [of The Dreadnaught Factor] on XBOX Live Arcade would be a blast..." -flojomojo "Would also like to see a remake of an old Intellivision game called 'The Dreadnought Factor' (also on the atari 5200)" -Andifferous This needed doing. So I did it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85j1Agw6Zgw The current version is just a prototype for the CREATE Jam contest. The prototype runs on generic Android hardware with an attached game controller. (e.g. Ouya dev hardware, an MK808 stick, or a Nexus 7 tablet) The game is ultimately going to be developed for the Ouya and GameStick game consoles. If anyone is interested in trying the prototype, let me know and I'll post the APK file. Note that I need your support to progress in the CREATE Jam contest. Please support me in the contest by liking the video below! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpLWWQ85VuE Hope you like it, and I'd love to hear your thoughts!
  9. Hey guys! Long time reader. I'm not a huge Atari guy, so I need some help identifying this Spider Fighter cart. I knew the moment I saw it that it was not normal, I found it odd. Can anyone tell me if it could be a proto? It is an authentic Activision case, however, the label is completely blank, but still the orange color they used. It has a sticker on the end, which has its product number and title. I would like to open it up and see the chip inside, but I can't figure out how to open it! Any help opening it? Identifying it? Thank you!
  10. I recently posted an article on my website about the video game compilations with the most number of games. As you'd expect, most of them feature classic titles from Atari, Activision, Midway and Infocom, but as someone who hasn't played an anthology in a while (I think the last one was probably the Capcom Classics series on the PlayStation Portable,) I was surprised to see that some of them feature dozens upon dozens of games. I leave the link here in case anyone would like to check out and please, any ideas, comments, corrections or feedback in general is more than welcome. Top 10: Massive Video Game Compilations
  11. I've got recently a number of Activision cartridges and has surprised me that tend to fail in a great number. The first one was Pitfall II - Lost Caverns, it failed after a few seconds, I did cleaning of contacts with cotton and alcohol and it still failed, but I noted that the case is made of soft plastic and though it has screws it can be opened using some thick things at the sides without disrupting label or removing screws. I used two thick USB memories as claws and I extracted the PCB from the inside, I noted that there was somekind of grease over it. I rubbed it generously with alcohol, dryed it with cotton, and it worked just fine Recently I got Zenji and H.E.R.O. NIB and guess what, both didn't worked. I applied same trick and managed to get them to working state I'm sharing this just in case someone has this same problem with Activision cartridges. I'm thinking that the automatic mount line of cartridges PCB used some kind of solder paste and with enough time it becomes conductive and makes the cartridge to fail. I have also two non-working Coleco cartridges but these are impossible to open because them are made of rigid plastic, so the only way is to remove label and I don't want to do it because the label is in excellent state.
  12. From the album: HES Cartridge Label Graphics

    Enduro H.E.S. Label graphic work for the Atari 2600 Activision cartridges

    © 1983 Activision, Created By Larry Miller

  13. Fishing Derby (Activision, Atari VCS, 1980) There are actually Fish Derbies in the real world, which I don't expect to be shocking news to any of you. However I thought reading the rules to one would be interesting. http://www.valdezfishderbies.com/pages/contest_rules.php It's possible that I wasn't entirely correct about it being interesting. Sorry if you just spent 30 minutes of your life there that you will never get back. Fishing Derby is by David Crane. David Crane apparently also programmed Outlaw (1978), Canyon Bomber (1979) and Slot Machine (1979) all for the Atari Video Computer System. Atari doesn't let anyone know who designs their games. Game designers are kept frozen in a vault under Atari Headquarters and only brought out of the vault when a new game is needed. One night, someone left the door to the vault open. Four designers escaped. Not being able to feed themselves due to not having any marketable skills, or even human language, they had to do the only thing they knew - game programming. All of this has been carefully documented elsewhere in case you think I'm making this up. Fishing Derby consists of two fishermen sitting across from each other on docks. The goal of the game is to collect 99 pounds of fish before the other. On the playfield there are six rows of fish. Rows 1 and 2 weigh 2 pounds each, rows 3 and 4 weigh 4 pounds each, rows 5 and 6 weigh six pounds each. Each fisherman lowers their lines and tries to hook a fish by moving the hook in front of the fish. When the fish is hooked it will slowly swim to the surface. When a player presses the red button, they're able to reel the fish in faster. There is a hazard of a shark swimming above the topmost row that will eat your fish off your hook so one must always be wary of the shark. Also, there's an interesting mechanic that only one fish may be reeled in at a time by either player. So, if you've both got a fish on the hook, the person who hooked theirs first may reel it in while the other waits. I guess there are ways of using this to your advantage, to not just delay the other person's poundage accumulation, but also to wait for the shark to be more on their side. I did not explore this tactic, but it's a thought. This game is fun. It has moments where you think you're going to get a fish up and, suddenly, you hit the shark losing your fish. There are many "so close!" moments. This is a game that is much more fun to play with a friend, but playing with the computer is good practice. I have yet to beat the computer playing with the computer on Beginner and myself on Advanced. The difference between the two settings is that to catch a fish on Beginner, you just need to get the end of your line near the fish's mouth. To catch a fish on Advanced, your line has to practically be right under the fish's nose. (( Thankfully, a post on Atari Age forums has finally helped me to figure out which way the difficulty switches on the 7800 need to go to be (A)dvanced (to the right) or (B)egginner (to the left) I'm trying to remember to put the Spacetime Protective Barriers up (aka parenthesis) when talking about things "not yet of this time" )) Oh, something different about this game from games that have gone before it: the surface of the water, in addition to providing a sort of "depth perception" to the body of water, actually "shimmers" like the surface of a pond or lake. Well, "like the surface of a pond or lake" in the sense that it is always changing - horizontal lines of blue and light-blue seemed to randomly wax and wane on the surface. It's a nice effect and I'm at a loss to think of another game on the Atari where something was animated in this way simply to provide eye-candy. The surface design has nothing to do with the game play and merely provides an animated aesthetic. Come to think of it, the fishermen also seem to provide a flavor that also doesn't contribute directly to the game play. I wonder if this is the first home videogame to do that? I just can't think of others at the moment. Thank you for reading my ramblings! I might make a game play video of the one-player game to see if my paranoia about the shark is true or not... I swear that sucker gravitates to the left during the single player games. I immediately just played two or three more one-player games, me=hard vs. computer=easy. I lost every time. I don't think my losses are entirely shark-related but if I can blame a shark. I will. Yes, I believe in having irrational prejudice towards sharks. Oh, I got through the entire article without including any fishing-related puns. My cognitive therapy exercises must be working or maybe I just wasn't feeling all that abusive today. Please feel free to put any fish-puns you care to make in the comments. Yes, I'm giving you license to make really awful fish-puns. Oh, the horror! The horror! Next time... back to Atari with Pele's Soccer!
  14. xucaen

    AtariAge Win Team

    From the album: AtariAge Fun Patches

    When you're with Atari Age, you're an official winner! Based on the Activision Ski Team Patch.

    © 2016

  15. Hey guys! So I was digging through my garage for some Atari games and found a wooden box full of carts. Two of which were very interesting. The first being an Activision Red Labeled Prototype of River Raid (prototype number is 163) and a sweet double ender cart with Chuck Norris' Superkicks and Ghost Manor: Just curious if anyone here has any more information about these Atari games. If anyone can share some info or educated guesses on what they think the worth of these carts may be I'd greatly appreciate it. I did some google searches and found a post about the prototype but that post is a little old. Not sure if much has changed in the atari collecting game. And I couldn't find anything on the Superkicks/Ghost Manor carts. There's another Superkicks/Artillery Duel on ebay but not a Ghost Manor cart. Thanks! - Hugo
  16. I've noticed the problem seems most prominent with Activision labels, all of those little dark specs that form all of the label. Why does this happen? Is there anything you can do to prevent this from happening? Why is it worse with Activision labels than others? I realize you also see this sometimes on other carts, mostly the black label Atari ones, but in most cases it seems the worst on Activision. Most Activision carts I come across nowadays are pretty rough looking because of it.
  17. Boxing (Activision, Atari VCS, 1980) We've seen a Boxing game once before! 1978 on the APF-1000MP. I'd actually recorded that play session on a VHS tape which now will not load anything because my VCR won't work. Well, the mechanical bits won't work. The electronic bits still work as a conduit to serve my old consoles. All hail the conduit! Oooh, boy... boxing... I don't get boxing as a sport. I get that it takes skill, that it's a discipline similar to any skill that involves using the brain and body. I just don't like that competitive boxing's goal seems to be to punch someone until they're unconscious. Other sports might have greater risk for more serious injuries, it just seems odd to me that boxing still happens as a spectator sport. Enough about my bleh-ness on the subject. Boxing is one of six titles (Six? I don't know why I've always thought there were just four.) in 1980 to be released by a third-party. I'm never totally sure about who the first two parties are. I assume that one would be you, the consumer. The other party would be... the company that manufactures the console itself, in this case, Atari. But which one of those counts as the "first-party" and which is the "second-party". I'm going to guess that Atari would be the first and the consumer would be the second and then out of NOWHERE, comes the third-party, only doing stuff because the first and second parties have done something first. So, Activision. You know that something named Activision has something to do with the game because they spend precious screen-space to emblazon a logo on the screen to read "Activision". Without squinting, I could tell what the screen was supposed to be: two boxers facing each other in a boxing ring. I always thought it was a pretty fair representation of the sport. No need to complicate things by adding the rest of the body. The point is to knock each other out and the head is the best way to do that. Bob Whitehead, the designer and programmer had said that he decided to make the rounds two minutes, instead of however long they are in boxing, because... and all he says is "You'll see." I think what he was saying was "Because your button-thumb can't take much more than two minutes if it can even survive that." This is a tough game for your button-thumb. This is an Atari VCS game I recommend playing with an anachronistic (( Genesis )) controller if at all possible. I thought it was just my old hands complaining, but my son said that he definitely started to feel it after just two games, too. My son thought it was fun in a very simple way - like most games from this era. Not quite the strategy of the games he's into now (DOTA2), but it was short so no biggie. We both particularly liked the animation of the punch landing on the face of the other player and how it collapsed into the rest of his head. We were slightly disappointed that there was nothing to celebrate a KO other than the score changing to show "KO" but we weren't really surprised either. The game has difficulty options which control the speed you move. A difficulty and you're moving slower, B difficulty and you're moving faster. If you want to give your boxing opponent an advantage, set your difficulty to A and theirs to B. If you want a fairly tough game, put yours at A and play the computer on B. You'll likely manage to win, but your thumb will be sore so who's really the winner? I decided to see what the computer would do if you just let your player sit there and do nothing. The reactions varied. Sometimes the computer would come over and immediately start beating on the uncontrolled player-boxer and other times it would pause a few moments before starting the beating. Regardless, about "halfway to KO" the computer would step back a bit, as if to give the player a break, but still dancing around as if to say "So... you gonna fight or what?" and then continue beating the snot out of the uncontrolled boxer-player. Quick video here of the computer (console player?) player beating the uncontrolled boxer-player. No, it's totally not exciting but I posted it anyway. http://youtu.be/WSyW3lKDsSE Anyway, it was fun to see Boxing again. If I had to pick a way to compare it to the Atari games that had come out before it, and I'd say it seemed more "solid" and the graphics seem better defined with no blinking. (( Warning: Anachronistic Reference I asked my son "Who's that Pokemon?" and he immediately said "oh, ha. Geodude." )) Annnnd, next time... let's try Fishing Derby, a game I don't think I've ever played!
  18. From the album: My Collection

    The label Was glued on upside down. How does that happen?
  19. From the album: Atari 2600 Gameplay on YPbPr Component

    Gameplay of Pitfall! NTSC version Played on my Atari 2600 4-Switch Woodgrain Console modded using Tim Worthington's 2600 RGB Mod showing it in YPbPr Component Video Output.

    © SavyIsJoshoArts aka Activision Man

  20. From the album: AtariAge Fun Patches

    Does your love of Atari drive you to excellence? Show off your Atari Age pride with this new AtariAge Excellence Club patch! Based on the Activision Explorers' Club patch.

    © 2016

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