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Found 51 results

  1. Original release: restc.bin Instructions: restless.ii.instructions.onepage.pdf Request. Aliens have colors: rest.color.c.bin Request. Stars in the background take a break. rest.ciro.c.bin - - - - - Below is an early XB game, also now known as "Restless I". Thread goes ahead and develops "Restless II", a game written in Assembly and released as a binary for cartridge. Move your ship left and right using the joystick. Shoot by pushing joystick up. 100 CALL CLEAR::CALL SCREEN(2)::CALL MAGNIFY(3) 110 CALL CHAR(64,"01010103070F001B376FDF00D47F1F03808080C0A0D000B8B4DADD0055FEF8C") 120 CALL CHAR(68,"0043AF19193F3F78073B72637339100001C2F42828F4F43AE0DCCEC6CE9C08") 130 CALL CHAR(72,"0103030301010101010100010100000180C0C0C08080800080808080008") 140 CALL CHAR(76,"000000107C3828000703117D39280000000020F8701040E0FCF8F0B01") 150 CALL COLOR(6,5,1)::FOR X=1 TO 20::CALL HCHAR(X,RND*32,76)::NEXT X 160 CALL SPRITE(#1,64,16,170,96,#2,68,16,10,96,2,0,#3,72,10,200,256) 170 CALL JOYST(1,X,Y)::IF X THEN CALL MOTION(#1,0,X*4) 180 IF Y=0 THEN IF RND>.8 THEN CALL MOTION(#2,1,RND*32-16) 190 IF Y THEN CALL POSITION(#1,Y,X)::CALL SPRITE(#3,72,10,154,X,-16,0) 200 CALL POSITION(#3,Y,X)::IF Y>154 THEN CALL DELSPRITE(#3) 210 CALL POSITION(#2,Y,X)::IF Y>154 THEN CALL DELSPRITE(#3)::Y=1::GOTO 230 220 CALL COINC(ALL,X)::IF X=0 THEN 170 ELSE Y=2 230 CALL MOTION(#1,0,0,#2,0,0,#3,0,0)::FOR X=3 TO 16::CALL COLOR(#Y,X)::CALL SOUND(-300,-6,(X*2)-6)::NEXT X 240 CALL PATTERN(#Y,76)::FOR X=3 TO 16 STEP .2::CALL COLOR(#Y,X)::NEXT X::GOTO 160
  2. Since the game is still WIP, I decided that it is better to continue here. Below you find the latest versions: Robot_City_20191110.zip Robot_City_20191118_RC1.zip Robot_City_20191124_RC2.zip Robot_City_20191125_RC3.zip Robot_City_20191126_RC4.zip Robot_City_20191201_RC5.zip Robot_City_20200425_RC6.zip Robot_City_20200426_RC7.zip Robot_City_20200427_RC8.zip
  3. Hi together! First of all, we will give Charles W. Marslett a Zotta (10^24) thank you for all his work he has done and another one for giving us the source code of his work into PD. Charles, from all 5 continents from all Atari users: Thank you so much!!! After a long search and loop verfication with Charles, we now can offer you: FAST FLOATING POINT source code for the ATARI, Revision F The first publication was made in 1981, improved and adapted to more and more Atari computers over the years. With Charles's work it was possible for the first time officially to make reliable calculations! All this up to 3.5 times faster than the original Atari rom for the floating point routines from $D800 to $DFFF. Another great advantage: all addresses for the floating point routines are the same as in the original Atari one! With the now final version F, sorry to say, all Atari OSs need to be vaccinated... Luckily, this can be done in just one shot by replacing the specific OS rom. Please take into account, Charles did this in 1981, while: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_754 is from 1985 on... This shows how far ahead of time Charles was and still is! For the gamers this could be a nice increase in calculation speed, like: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_inverse_square_root in the game Doom later. For serious calculations, this is a no miss under all circumstances. We further would like to thank Robert "Bob" Puff for translating the original AMAC source code from Charles to the MAC/65 and drac030 for finding the very last byte to be changed. A big thank you goes to the University of Michigan for hosting the file: faschips.arc Have fun and warm up the EPROM bruners... All the best.
  4. 2019.12.29 I've found a bug, that only shows up in the disk version here at my end. I forgot to clear a memory location used for scoring. Files updated. blockc.bin block.dsk Filename: BLOCK - - - - - The idea will be to insert pairs of colored blocks into two piles, one on either side of the screen. Create a group of three or more adjacent blocks of the same color and they'll disappear, gaining you points. Pile up too many and you lose the game.
  5. CyranoJ

    JagStudio

    JagStudio is an advanced development suite for the Atari Jaguar that allows you to code using Assembler, BASIC or C and is based around Reboot's powerful RAPTOR API. Regardless of your programming capabilities, Beginners to Advanced coders can utilize this flexible package that will fully suit the needs of anyone looking to program exciting new games for the Jaguar. The benefits of using JagStudio are the Hardware Abstraction Layers (HALs) and the combination of external modules available to use. This allows you, the developer, to get on with writing your games while taking advantage of the Jaguar's powerful chipset without worrying about tedious, underlying mundane routines. The same results that once took days or weeks to achieve can now be done in a matter of minutes, thanks to the power of JagStudio! You are one click away from 64-bit creativity! The current release of JagStudio along with any previous versions can be obtained at its homepage: https://jagstudio.reboot-games.com Some of the features of JagStudio are: Code in your language preference of Assembly, BASIC or C. (Assembly and C are currently in Beta... help us make them better!) Commands have been renamed (from rB+) to reflect the individual modules they control and prefixed as such: rapPrint, u235PlaySample, etc. RAPTOR API Debug Function brings useful program variable visibility to the forefront, aiding ease of game development. GameDrive support along with MRQ file creation. ROM builder now adds FAST GPU depack by default for quicker startup times. Ability to build and split ROMs up to 6MB into HI/LO for EPROM burning. Updated both RAPTOR and U235 Sound Engine APIs to current versions, bringing additional benefits of both in a single updated package. Added universal JagPad Input - A single call that works with either U235 or ZeroSquare sound engine so projects can be easily converted between the two should your needs change. Many enhancements and bug fixes to the original rB+ code (eg, you can now include files >4mb, all files unpacked using GPU by default) All documentation and examples have been updated with a simple rB+ to JagStudio conversion guide to bring your old projects over to the fully updated JagStudio. Includes project examples for all supported languages (Assembly, BASIC and C) for anyone looking to get started quickly. We plan on keeping this alive and active, with ongoing improvements and new features and look forward to seeing what you all make with it. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask in this newly created sub-forum. Happy coding, everyone! The JagStudio Team. @CyranoJ @Sporadic @Clint Thompson A huge "Thank-You" to ggn for creating rB+ upon which all this is based. Please do not pester him with support requests for JagStudio.
  6. snakec.bin - - - - - Origin https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snake_(video_game) Back in 2005 I did a routine for scrolling a line of text. Added a few bits to make a demo. It scrolls the text and reacts when you press fire, but otherwise stalls / stalled (wasn't brought any further).
  7. I was able to download diskassembler, but have no idea how to use it. Does anyone know where I can get the manual?
  8. A project I have been working on for the last two years is nearing completion i.e. my next book called 'Programming Games for the Colecovision and Adam in Assembler'. It includes a tutorial section working through the steps of creating a game, with a Z80 assembler primer and information on how to set up a cross development environment (similar but extended from my Let's Make a Retro Game series). It also includes a complete Colecovision BIOS reference guide, covering ALL of the jump table BIOS calls with explanations and examples for using each call. There are extensive memory and port maps, also with explanations etc. It will have a dedicated web site section where you can download the code (for lazy typers :)). The early pre-order link for the Kindle edition is available here. Cover is still a draft. Shortly after I have released the Kindle Edition, there will also be a physical print edition available on Amazon's print to order service, which I used for my last book and has been received well. It does have some colour screen shots and pictures in it, let me know how many people would be interested in a full colour edition, rather than a colour cover with black and white interior. The book is currently 90% complete, with the majority of the content completed, but I have about ten quality read through passes to do and need to tidy-up/check all the source code etc. I am aiming for a 1st August 2020 release date at this stage.
  9. Greetings folks, Just an FYI for anyone looking for reprinted out of print programming books to try Lulu.com I have used Lulu before but this time I found a book I have been desperately looking for years. I have been wanting the Compute! published books Programming the 64 and Programming the Vic by West and was able to find the 64 on Ebay, but the Vic one appears to some rare air to find. I love West's two books for the C64 and Vic and have been wanting them for many years. I even went as far to email libraries in Texas once I found out they had the Vic book to offer them to buy it, however all of them could not sell the book to me.. I visited lulu and it looks like someone just recently uploaded the PDF and Lulu has made Programming the Vic for reproduction. I am just passing this on to anyone who may be looking for this awesome Vic 20 book! The printing is done well and it is the same size of the 64 original one and the binding is excellent. I also bought another copy (I have the original) of the Butterfields Machine Language for the C64, 128 expanded editions. The Butterflied book is printed much smaller but still looks good, I was surprised they went with the small size when it should be the same size of the West book. In any case I am not connected to Lulu and do not make any money or get anything from them.. I just wanted to pass on a place for anyone who was looking for these tough to find books and do not mind a reprint. The books were very reasonable priced. I put a few screenshots here for anyone who might be interested. I hope anyone who is interested in Assembly Commodore programming can find this knowledge useful for them. If anyone here is looking for these
  10. I recently got a beige non-QI TI-99/4a system with a speech synth and several cartridges, including Extended BASIC and Editor Assembler. The joysticks I have are worn out and don't work. I was able to revive the Mitsumi mylar keyboard. I don't have a PEB or memory expansion or disk drive. I'd like to do some BASIC and assembler coding on the system, as well as play some games. What should I be looking for? Stuff I'm considering to do or purchase... - Cassette cable and recorder - Atari joystick adapter interface - Is there a preferred model? Most that I see don't have any kind of case on them. - Memory expansion - What is the go to for adding more memory to this system? - Disk drive, or disk drive emulator - I have a Gotek drive in my Amiga. My Coco has an SDC cartridge. My Atari connects to my Windows PC to retrieve files. How can I emulate a disk drive on the TI-99/4a? - I'm currently connected to a TV using a component video cable. Are there any video upgrades for the TI-99/4a to use VGA, component or HDMI? - I have an MX-80 parallel printer. Can I connect this to the TI-99/4a? Is it worth the hassle? - Is there an assembler/editor that works on a TI system without a disk drive? How about without the 32K expansion? I've done some searching online, and checked out some of the online vendors and eBay. Most of the info I find is outdated and I'm not sure which of the upgrades are good for a system today. Any and all info is appreciated!
  11. minec.bin - - - - - I got sidetracked (again) and spent a few hours on making perhaps yet another version of Minesweeper for the TI. The link above tells you a little something about the game, rules etc. As of now you can't play it, but please do test and report. Version 0.1 is attached here: You can move the cursor around. And you can press 1, 2 or 3 to start / generate a new game. So obviously there's a few things to add. What I like is how relatively fast a new game is generated. The premise is, and pretty much has been with many of my efforts, stock TI, no memory expansion, and game on cartridge in a Atarisoft style of 8K or 16K ROM only. We're at 35% of 8K capacity, and plenty of room for saving bytes later if necessary.
  12. #Atari8bit #FujiNet In MAC/65 making assembler version of netcat ... really don't get why people liked MAC/65 so much, I much preferred AMAC, but.. *shrug*
  13. A good assembler has ROM section headings. These are a way to cleanly divide the source code into settings, so you can definitely figure out at which address each section starts. Think of an assembler as if were like Microsoft Word. Section headings could appear as solid-colored bars with text on them. The user should have control over what color to make the bar. They also might have control over the font. For example, your main program header might look like this (note that all images are simulated): Notice I used the Roco font. Anyone familiar with Sonic The Hedgehog 2 will recognize this, but it's the actual font, not the Sonic 2-rendered one. Every computer program needs a vertical blank (or "V-Blank") routine. Its header might look like: One common thing to have in any program are math routines. So, you might include a section like this: For a hardware/software implementation, fonts could use a bitmap. Up to 96 different character glyphs can be stored. In addition, the numbers could be made a little bit bigger if the user chose to. Each character's bitmap can be stored using 1, 2, or 4 bits per pixel. For each character, the size needs to be specified, as well as where its glyph data can be found. For file storage, section headers could use this format (each pair of letters represents a byte): hh ff rr gg bb ll tt tt ... hh = Token for a section header (a fixed value). ff = Flags. If bit 7 is set, restart the numbering at 1. If bit 6 set, toggle whether the number is shown for this and later sections. rr gg bb = Section header color, a 24-bit RGB value. ll = Length of text. tt = The text shown. It doesn't include "Section #". It's in ASCII. Let's say that the section header token is $00, and I'll use the vertical blank section header as an example. The byte stream in the source file would look like this: 00 C0 00 60 20 0F 56 42 4C 41 4E 4B 20 52 4F 55 54 49 4E 45 53 The 00 signals the start of the section header. C0 means to make this section #1, and turn on section numbering (by default, it's off). 00 60 20 is the RGB value. It produces a dark green color. The 0F determines how many characters there will be in the section's name. The rest is the text, in ASCII. The text says "VBLANK ROUTINES". Section headers are not taken into account when compiling a ROM. They are there to cleanly divide source code. When the file is opened, the number of headers is counted, and section numbers are assigned accordingly.
  14. walker7

    Section Header 0

    From the album: The Best Assembly Computer

    This is what the section header for the main program would look like. Note that it doesn't have a section number.
  15. hi there, it is done, after the atari 2600 game AXE, here the latest real retro game SQUAREZ 2015. it is a demake of a quite addictive flash game. it is simple: make as much points as possible. collect the bonus and avoid the squares. simple to understand. but don't be too greedy! of course programmed in assembler (much more fun than the 6502 on atari2600). but don't look into the code - i will never get into the assembler heaven with this. the game was tested with ParaJVE (Emulator) and on one my real vectrex. the vectrex is quite a cool hardware with cool libraries. quite a cool game engine (we had to say in our days .-). i will never understand why atari didn't brought this out itself - they were the masters of vectors. after the vectrex shootemup (on this i work at the moment) i would like to finish my intellivision game. is there someone who would sell me a multicard, so that i can test the software on real hardware? thanks for any help or tipp or someone who would sell it to me. have fun [email protected] ;*************************************************************************** ; SQUAREZ 2o15 BY LA1N ; (A RE(DE)MAKE OF THE WELL ; KNOWN FLASH GAME SQUARES) ;*************************************************************************** ; ; @ixistenz ; ; THIS IS A DEMAKE OF THE FLASH GAME SQUARES (2002)! ; I THOUGHT IT IS A SIMPLE GAMEMECHANIC HHH ; CODED IT AFTER AXE (ATARI 2600) AND INTELLIVISION GAME* ; * NOT YET RELEASED ; ; MECHANICS: MAKE AS MUCH POINTS AS POSSIBLE. ; COLLECT FOR POINTS. AVOID SQUAREZ! ; THERE CAN BE AT LEVEL7 UP TO 12 SQUAREZ ON SCREEN! ; DONT BE TOO GREEDY! ; ; YOU WILL FIND OLDER PROJECTS OF LA1N AT HTTP://WWW.LA1N.CH ; OR LOOK FOR OUR GAMEART AT HTTP://WWW.AND-OR.CH ; ; CREDITS GO TO RICHARDH FOR HIS MULTICARDS (THANKS!) ; ;*************************************************************************** SQUAREZ2015.BIN squarez.asm
  16. Hi! I'm using DASM and I don't know if I am doing something wrong or this is just a bug on the compiler. I have this code in one .asm file: genAutoMaskTable ldx #0 On other .asm file, I just include the first file and use the names as if they were local jsr genAutoMaskTable When I run DASM, genAutoMaskTable points to GENAUTOMASKTABLE: 0bd1 And the JSR from the main file is right, as you can see: 1C:06 20 D1 0B jsr genAutoMaskTable But.... the code is not there, it is one byte after the calculated address D2:0B A2 00 ldx #0 Any ideas?
  17. Is there any reason to own a mini-memory cartridge if you own Editor/Assembler cartridge. I been eyeing a guy on eBay who been selling off about 1/2 dozen mini-mem carts and trying to justify to myself the purchase of one.
  18. Just stumbled into a bug with MADS' built-in ADW macro when used with (ZP),Y: LDY #$04 ADW (OBSPEC),Y PTR2 PTR4 A334: A0 04 LDY #$04 A336: 18 CLC A337: B1 C1 LIMITCLIP.OFFSCREEN LDA (OBSPEC),Y A339: 65 E2 [email protected] ADC PTR2 A33B: 85 E6 STA PTR4 A33D: C8 INY A33E: B1 C1 LDA (OBSPEC),Y A340: 65 E3 ADC $E3 A342: 85 E6 STA PTR4 ; <<<<<<< should be $E7, not $E6 LDY #$04 MWA (OBSPEC),Y PTR4 A334: A0 04 LDY #$04 A336: B1 C1 LDA (OBSPEC),Y A338: 85 E6 STA PTR4 A33A: C8 INY A33B: B1 C1 LDA (OBSPEC),Y A33D: 85 E7 STA $E7 ; <<<<<<<<<<<<< $E7 = correct Using the latest build here, and I'm sure ADW used to store the MSB correctly in older versions. Haven't looked to see if the bug exists in SBW as well.
  19. Hello all, I am a new to this forum. I would like to program the 2600 as a hobby. I have been reading posts this morning on how to begin. I am hoping that some of you nice folks can save me some time. I have read about DASM, batari Basic and others. Can someone answer a few questions for me and save me a great deal of time. Maybe this will help others also. What editor assembler software is used most these days? What do you recommend? Please leave a link. I have downloaded Barair Basic and and IDE and will install it today. Any useful links? Any other software that you folks use? I downloaded Stella and I have ordered a Harmony cartridge. I know these questions have been asked before but I ask for your patience and help. I hope to start writing some code today if I can get the software I need in place. Thanks to all of you in advance. Ed Cheek
  20. squaryc.bin - - - - - Well, steering a mouse with a joystick is perhaps not optimal, but here goes anyway. For this demo, you'll get to move around leaving a trail behind. No, it's not going to be another snake game. You accelerate and de-accelerate. If you hit the borders, you'll bounce off. Just like Parallax Starfield, you'll be able to form some pretty perfect circles, that is, if you know how to apply the right pressure(s) at the right time. And there's a bit of friction as well. As for the registration point of the mouse, I'm using the same original default from the Amiga Workbench 1.x.
  21. parac.bin - - - - - In the footsteps of managing 32 sprites, without more than 4 sprites per horizontal line, as explored in Bubbles (demo). If you keep a number of sprites stacked vertically (no vertical overlap), they will only occupy 1 of the 4 sprites allowed horizontally. In Bubbles I made each stack move up with their own individual speed. This time I will try and move the 4 stacks in any direction. Here's a quick setup of 4 stacks. Oh, and instead of having 8 sprites in each stack (or plane), it's 6 + 7 + 9 + 10 = 32 sprites. The number of stars close to you are less than those far away.
  22. walker7

    Section Header 2

    From the album: The Best Assembly Computer

    Another example of a program's section header. This could be used for all the math routines used in the game (e.g. multiply, divide, random numbers).
  23. I'm working on several different TI-99/4A related projects at any time (there's a Top 10 out of 146). Surely giving it more thought than actual coding. Most certainly less than an hour of coding per week. Much is design and decisions anyway. Committing is perhaps crucial but then again. Real life is a bitch. Lately I've got this headache. Right now the plan is; get away from the computer, get away from screens - tv and gaming, get some exercise, go for a walk and get some fresh air, be positive and enjoy, be serious, commit and take responsibility, take action and stick to it, navigate and listen, and be there for the family. Your input is appreciated.
  24. Now that I have a working disk manager, I want to start doing some Coleco ADAM Z80 Assembler for EOS. I've found an online IDE that looks perfect. Does anyone have an INC file that defines all of the entry points to the EOS public functions? Remember, sharing is caring. And BTW, this would be put on the ADAM Wiki for posterities' sake.
  25. I think we need a thread like the development thread for just the software we make. I have found it a 'hit or miss' when trying to keep up with the various games, apps, virtual-cartridges people are coming up with on this board. We could put the beta and completed versions on the thread. Be glad to monitor it. Just a thought.
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