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Found 82 results

  1. Good morning, everyone, As some of you may already know, I started adopting 1200XLs a couple years ago as part of the return to my Atari hobby. In the process, I managed to adopt 57 units, several with their original boxes (and some with their packaging styrofoam). However, two weeks ago I lost my job of ten years, and everything has changed; now, I'm forced to end a big part of my hobby to cover my wife's medical expenses of the past year (total knee replacement, medications) and our basic living expenses for the immediate future until I can sort out employment. My lost job could be someone's gain. Having invested around $10,000 in 1200XLs alone, I am now going to be rehoming them to either an individual or group of individuals willing to pay $7000 for 50 of them. This will include any and all original boxes and/or packaging, and power supplies, of course. Also included: 1200XL-related manuals, guides, and promotional materials. This averages the cost per system to $140— and considering the current selling price on EBay, it seems like a very reasonable deal. A hefty lump sum, I agree, which is why I'm posting this strictly as an interest check before I go forward with making an official post that includes photos and itemized listing. Given my present financial situation, I cannot really break up the 50 systems into individual sales, sorry. Frankly, we need the cash. This is a fantastic opportunity, regardless. Seven people, for example, pooling their funds to secure the entire lot and then reselling them would spread the cost out. Ten people coming together, even more so. And twenty-five individuals working collectively drops the per-person investment to under $300 per person for 2 1200XLs each. Again, this is NOT for only 50 1200XL systems: I have a sizable collection of original literature and original packaging/materials that will be included, bolstering the overall value of this package offer. If the interest isn't present, I'll reluctantly need to turn to EBay to rehome the lot, furthering my losses, of course— but I would prefer to see these go to those who take their Atari hobby as seriously as I do. Pickup would need to be local for the obvious logistical reasons— but also affords the opportunity to, in person, appreciate this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for what it is. NOTE: I'm currently in the process of inventorying/re-verifying the rest of the Atari hardware I've adopted these last few years, and would be open to include a significant majority of it for an additional $2000. This would include Atari 800s, 800XLs, 130XEs, XEGS systems with keyboards, 1050 drives, Indus drives, at least one Trak drive, Rana drives, 850s, and so on. My hobby inventory can be viewed at any time by visiting the link below, but keep in mind that I am still getting the listings finalized (I'll be keeping a few things, and software/books will NOT be a part of the overall rehoming effort). https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1BxNhdFR69ypdnINzIh4QK4v4JrjPLsGVvGxOEEvUMH8/edit?usp=sharing Finally, I understand that some may want to make an offer on the entire lot. Contact me by PM, and we can discuss it if your offer seems reasonable, especially if your intentions will benefit the Atari community. But, please! no lowballing or trying to profit from the sudden dire straits my wife and I have found ourselves traversing. I will do everything I can to make sure that the buyer(s) are satisfied that this was a one-of-a-kind effort to help us while taking on an entire collection for the Atari community. Submitted for your perusal and consideration, Timothy Kline Below is a sneak peek inside my Atari 1200XL vault.
  2. We are readying our next release of newly developed Odyssey hardware and games: OdysseyNow Game Pack 2! The largest focus will be on hardware, as this will contain the most consequential hardware add-on in the Odyssey’s history. It will make new games possible, as well as have a major impact on many existing games. We call it the English Splitter. In the original Odyssey controller, three knobs and one button control every aspect of the player spots and the ball. The problem is that the human body only possesses two hands, and thus we can operate a maximum of two knobs simultaneously. This affects every Odyssey ball game, as the hand and brain must “switch gears” from controlling the Vertical knob to controlling the English knob (ball spin). This gap of time involved slows down the games. One of the greatest Odyssey ball games, Volleyball, is terribly hindered by this: there just isn’t enough time to lunge after the ball, hit it, then switch to the English knob fast enough to direct the ball over the net and then down into the opposite court. As a result, the game has to be played on a relatively low ball speed. The English Splitter is a device that plugs into your controller socket (there’s one for the Left and one for the Right; each is electronically equivalent but physically different). Each English Splitter is connected by a cable to a special English Controller, which contains one knob and one button. The Splitter also contains a duplicate controller port into which you plug your original controller. Thus when both Left and Right Splitters are plugged in, you will have four controllers in total. Each Splitter contains a switch that turns the English Controller on or off. When on, it takes over control of the English knob from the main controller (turning the main controller English knob will have no effect, but turning the knob on the English controller will give that player full control over ball spin). When the Splitter’s switch is turned off, full control is transferred back to the main controller. This way you will never have to plug and unplug your controllers and Splitters in order to instantly switch between classic and split modes. In addition, the yellow button on each English Controller allows the holder of that controller to serve the ball. This makes it possible for a single player to, for instance, return the ball to their own side without requiring possession of the other player’s main controller. This can be used in the original game Submarine or the OdysseyNow game Tannhauser Gate, for instance, to greatly ease gameplay. The English Splitter system can also be used to multiply the number of players from 2 to 4. Any ball game can now be played with 3 or 4 players, with English control transferred to a second player on each team. It can be used to great effect in nearly any ball game. Our new version of Volleyball, Team Volleyball, makes full use of this capability: Note: This image is a simulation. Our game comes with a half-height overlay. In addition to Team Volleyball, this game pack includes Danceoff, a new ball game that is meant to be played for the duration of one pop song. It involves attempting to “knock” the opposing side’s dancers off the dancefloor. This game can be played 2-player, but when played with 4 players using the English Controllers, it becomes a team dance in which one player defends the team’s dancers while the other goes after those on the opposing side. The dancers are plastic chips that are physically stuck to the overlay and removed as they are defeated. Before the game begins, players may either choose a pattern for their dancers to occupy or randomly generate their positions with two included, color-coded dice. The third game included in this game pack is a reproduction of the rarest of all original Odyssey games: Soccer. Soccer was only released as a bundled game with some European releases of the Odyssey. Because the Odyssey did not do well in Europe, and not many sets have been preserved, the game is almost impossible to find. We have lovingly reproduced the overlay, instructions, and dual-wheel scoreboard in all of their detail, allowing this game to be played by a new generation. Note, however, that our scoreboard is 85% of the size of the original. We had to made it slightly smaller to be cost effective to produce, and to fit in our tube box. The overlay is reproduced with filled-out corners for a rectangular shape, to better fit more contemporary televisions. However, the original rounded contour is preserved as a thin line in the overlay, so players may cut out the original shape if they wish. The English Splitter sounds deceptively simple, but inside it is anything but: the unique analog nature of the Odyssey makes simple pass-through circuits impossible, and multiple versions of this device failed before a year of development finally lead to the breakthrough (specially implemented diode logic) that made it possible. It is also very time consuming and expensive (using obsolete, discontinued components) to manufacture, or we would be able to make more and charge less! In order to get the most out of Team Volleyball (or even regular Volleyball), this Pack comes with a Wall Height Adjustment kit. This is an optional upgrade. It requires two solder points on the Odyssey’s motherboard, and some hot glue for the final adjustment pot. It is an easy upgrade to perform and comes with fully illustrated instructions. When used with the Team Volleyball overlay, you can adjust your wall height to exact spec. Most Odysseys are well out of spec for wall height, which can greatly diminish this game. This game pack confers a couple of advantages to Tannhauser Gate, for owners of OdysseyNow Game Pack 1. First, you can adjust the height of the open gate with the Wall Height adjustment. Second, the Scan player can utilize an English controller to return their ball without needing to reach over and utilize the Explore player’s controller. We have several more amazing games in development that make special use of the English Splitters. Those will appear sometime in the future. Because our last game pack sold out within a few hours of being posted, we’re trying to manage this release a little more equitably, in two tiers. The notice for the first 10 copies will be posted in the OdysseyNow Facebook group (only), to give that community the best chance of picking these up. We're letting everyone know this in advance, to give you time to join that group and turn your notifications on so you are ready. Once those copies are gone, we'll post elsewhere (such as in this forum). At that time, anyone who wants one will have to let us know (very briefly) why/where/who. We'll give it a few days to ensure that more people will know about this in time, then select the homes we think will be happiest, and then process payments. This will also help us get to know more of you better! We will produce only 15 of these sets in total. Stay tuned to the Facebook group for orders to open soon! https://www.facebook.com/groups/odysseynow/
  3. OdysseyNow Game Pack 2 is now available to pre-order! It includes 3 games, an Odyssey system upgrade, and a set of major new peripherals: Left and Right English Splitters. We've set up a simple Paypal webstore for this, here. We are only producing 15 copies ever of this set. Paypal is keeping track of inventory. It will only take your money if copies are still available! I'll update this post once they are sold out. Read about Game Pack 2 in this thread. For more discussion on this, and early announcements, please consider joining our Facebook group devoted to Odyssey and early video games. We are have produced everything included with this set except for the scoreboard listed below; we are waiting for those to be produced. When we receive them, all orders will ship. It could be in December, or at the latest, early January. All proceeds from these sales go toward funding the OdysseyNow project, to research and develop more hardware and games for the system! Here's the complete list of contents: Left English Splitter set (Splitter Base + English Controller) Right English Splitter set (Splitter Base + English Controller) English Splitter Instructions Wall Adjustment Upgrade kit Danceoff overlay Danceoff plastic dancer pieces (6 red and 6 blue) in velveteen bag Dice X2 (black and red) Danceoff Instructions Team Volleyball Overlay Team Volleyball Instructions Soccer overlay (recreation) Soccer Instructions (reproduction) Soccer dual-wheel scoreboard (85% scale reproduction)
  4. I was pouting over the lousy 64KB of ram in my 65XE the other day and decided to look into expansion options. It's one of those without the ECI port, so it would need to be an internal unit. Looking at what was out there, I wasn't very happy. How about I try my own hand at it? Here's my initial thoughts on the matter. The idea is 1) it must use the "standard" CIA PORTB for bank control, 2) it cannot interfere with the normal operation of any of the bits, and 3) it should support CPU/ANTIC bank control. I looked at the memory available online... what do you know, there's a 2Mx8 5V 45ns SRAM from Digikey for about $5. Two of them would fill out a full 8 bit bank select just peachy. But how do you get 8 bank address lines from the port without interfering with the operation of the bits? A latch comes to mind. And that's the main thing - a hex D-Type flip-flop. Clearing PB7 will clear the latch, so asserting the self-test ROM will just clear the latch. No problem there. I use PB6 as the flip-flop clock (latched on rising edge). So if this were in an XEGS, clearing PB6 enables the Missile Command rom, which wouldn't be an issue as long as the code to switch banks isn't in either the bank memory space or in the rom cart space. No problem there, either, especially on systems without Missile Command. I use PB5-0 as the inputs to the d-flip-flops... no problems there as long as the code to switch banks isn't in bank memory space, the cart space, or the OS ram space... so in the first 16KB; oh, and the ints are off unless you keep the int code and data in the first 16KB as well. Still not an issue. But how do I get 8 bank address bits from 6 latched bits. Well, just use PB2 and 3 as normal. The latched bits extend them from 2 bits to 8 bits. Use A21 and it's inverse to select one of the two sram chips, use PB4 and 5 along with A14 and A15 and /HALT to generate the other chip enable, a few gates for output enable and write enable and Bob's your uncle. The prices in the pic are from Digikey in single unit quantities for surface mount parts. A handful of bypass caps to round it out at less than $15 in parts... minus the board. That's gonna be the "fun" part. Been a while since I made a board. I'll update as I get further along. Comments and suggestions are appreciated.
  5. I’m excited to show you the OdysseyNow Game Pack, the result of a lot of research and development at the Vibrant Media Lab that I direct in Pittsburgh. We’ve developed a brand new game card for the Odyssey (the first one not designed by the Magnavox team), a brand new accessory controller (the first created besides the original light rifle), and a set of three new games. This was all produced as part of the OdysseyNow project, which you can read more about in another AtariAge thread. Here’s a glimpse of the games… Tannhauser Gate In a remote wing of a remote galaxy, on the frontiers of cosmic knowledge, lies Tannhauser's Gate, a colossal directed energy beam fed by a spacio-temporal anomaly of seemingly ceaseless energy. On the other side of the Gate is The Expanse, one of the most mysterious and deadly regions of outer space yet discovered, a zone that seems to vacillate in its allegiance to the laws of the quantum to the laws of the galactic. Spacetime here seems to have a will of its own. Charybdis, a black hole, lies not far from the Gate, and is clearly related to it in some way. Crimson Maw, a mostly uninhabitable planet, nonetheless provides researchers in the area with an ample supply of both common and rare minerals. Unfortunately, the planet and its single natural satellite, “Odysseus,” are isolated from the gate by the massive parade of interstellar stone known as the Scyllan Corridor. Closer at hand, yet surprisingly more barren, is the planet Coronation. Because few minerals or supplies of interest can be found there, it is used mostly as a garbage dump. Such is the fate of even the most regal of mineral-poor planets. Multiple interstellar civilizations have sent researchers to the area, mainly in an attempt to understand the intergalactic wormhole that serves to connect this remote spot to the energy-rich Flywheel Galaxy via Quantum Refluctuation. While ostensibly a demilitarized zone, Tannhauser Gate is plagued by intense rivalry over the scientific knowledge that it provides to its sponsoring corporations, governments, and collectives. These researchers must uneasily share a moon base shielded by the Gate. To venture beyond its boundaries is to be bombarded with a relentless stream of dark particles. No shields can last for long. While an interstellar team of engineers has managed to harness the local energy flux to construct the Gate, its operation remains partially at the whim of the energy patterns that feed it, making the expanse beyond the Gate even more risky to explore. For this reason, the largest scientific collective to currently study the area has created a specialized, long-range scanning platform. Located safely behind Tannhauser Gate, it launches and receives C-beams capable of probing any form of matter. Their rivals, however, use replicant-manned spacecraft to explore outside of the Gate, directly. Take on the roles of the Scanner, Explorer, and Gate Keeper as you compete to complete your missions and disrupt your rivals. Will you be the one to discover the secret of Tannhauser Gate? Tannhauser Gate is a 3 player game that makes use of a newly designed game card (#13). This card includes an external Aux jack and a “Switch Controller” that attaches to it. The card generates the Tannhauser Gate. The switch controller opens and closes the gate. The Gate Keeper player draws a special Gate card at the beginning of each round, which contains a special gate pattern that must be followed. The Scanner player remains stationary throughout the round, but may send C-beams (represented by the Odyssey’s ball) through the gate to scan various objects in the expanse beyond. The Scanner draws Scan cards that provide specific assignments to carry out. Meanwhile, the Explorer must charge up their ship, activate their life support system, wait for the right moment, and zip out into the expanse, attempting to complete their missions (given on special Explore cards) and return to safety inside the gate before their ship is destroyed by the energy fields of the expanse. This is extremely risky, however, as misjudging the ever-changing rhythm of the gate could cause the ship to implode before it can reach safety! In addition to Game Card #13 and the Switch Controller, Tannhauser Gate makes use of the Damocles controller, the first Accessory controller for the Odyssey besides the light rifle. The Damocles controller plugs into the ACC port on the Odyssey. When Player 2 presses the large red button on its face, a countdown timer lights up and begins counting down. When it hits zero, it extinguishes your on-screen player spot. Its button also lights up red to remind you that you’re dead! A white “regen” button allows you to regenerate your ship when the time is right. In Tannhauser Gate, all three players are doing completely different tasks using completely different tools, yet all three interact in unexpected ways (the gate can bounce the Scanner’s C-Beams away as well as “lock out” the Explorer at a crucial moment, Scan missions can require the Scanner to scan the Explorer, and Explore missions sometimes require the Explorer to intercept C-Beams. The results ensure that no two games of Tannhauser Gate are the same! Fukushima Fukushima is the first-ever cooperative game for the Magnavox Odyssey. Two players are placed inside the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and must work together to prevent the inevitable: a meltdown. Each player takes on a different role in the plant. Player 2 uses the Damocles controller to continually complete a Cooling Cycle, while also assisting Player 1 complete a progressively more difficult Maintenance Cycle, which involves directing the ball to specific points while also activating particular buttons at specific times. This would be enough of a challenge as it is, but a third player with a timer consults a Meltdown reference card and at the appointed times calls out various new disasters that the players must contend with. (Note: If you only have two players, you could also make a recording of the Meltdown Cycle and play that back during gameplay.) The game starts out easy, but gets progressively more difficult as you try to beat the clock to safely shut down the reactor before it fully melts down. Because the game has a delineated set of “levels,” you can easily track your progress. Your team can even compete against other teams for a high score (level achieved + time survived at the point of failure). No one here has been able to beat the game yet. Maybe you can? Fukushima is not only the first coop Odyssey game, but is also the first to utilize the “Wall adjust” control on the console itself. In this game, the wall represents the reactor’s containment barrier, which must sometimes be moved by the players to gain access. But be very careful: when the containment barrier is open, you must prevent the ball from entering the core or it will instantly melt down! Fukushima requires game card #13 and the Damocles controller. Super Cat and Mouse: Cheesy Castle At OdysseyNow, we are big fans of the underappreciated Cat and Mouse game on the Odyssey. We think that a fun concept and mechanic was undermined by substandard production design, and have decided to re-invent the game by giving it a proper setting: a medieval castle. Now, the mouse must collect cheese strewn about the castle by lazy humans, while avoiding the King’s fierce cat! As the King’s cat, of course, you must rid the castle of that peasant vermin.
  6. I'm starting this thread as a means to hopefully promote some F18A development, answer specific questions about programming the F18A, and finally as place to look for links to updated documentation and eventually firmware updates. This first post will always have the latest documents and updates attached, so there is no need to go digging through the thread to find the most recent information. I also hope it will contain questions, answers, and code examples. I would like to keep this thread technical and on-topic, so if you have other general F18A questions or comments, please start a new thread or use the other existing F18A thread. * Documentation: On-going. This is something I hope to complete, but until then Rasmus has collected many of the F18A programming posts from the forum and created PDF of them (thank you Rasmus!) See the files attached to this thread, and please ask F18A technical questions in this thread. The main F18A webpage (http://codehackcreate.com/archives/30) has the main feature list, as well as an initial post to getting started with programming the F18A. As I add documentation, I will post it on the website first, then make an update here to let anyone interested know there is something new. * Register Use Spreadsheet: Libre Office / Open Office .ods format. This is the primary spreadsheet I used while developing the F18A, and all functionality was documented in the spreadsheet first, then converted into HDL. That means the spreadsheet is always up to date with respect to the F18A's functionality. While some of the F18A's features require more documentation to use, much of the functionality is very self explanatory and can be used just by looking at the spreadsheet and reading the notes. For example, it does not take much to guessing to figure out what the "horizontal scroll register" does. ************* COMPATIBILITY ************* Pin-compatible replacement for the TMS9918A, 9928, 9929, and TMS9118 Video Data Processors. The F18A has been tested in the following systems: TI-99/4A Home Computer ColecoVison Game Console* ColecoVision ADAM Computer# Toshiba HX-10 MSX1 Computer Toshiba Pasopia-IQ MSX1 Computer JVC Victor HC-7 MSX1 Computer Yamaha CX5M MSX1 [email protected] SpectraVideo 328 Computer*@ Tomy Tutor Computer*@ SEGA SG-1000 Game Console SEGA SC-1000II (replaced a TMS9118 VDP) Telegames Personal Arcade Powertran Cortex Computer * Note1: These systems are known to have the original VDP soldered directly to the system circuit board and will require desoldering and a socket installed. # Note2: The ADAM computer requires an "offset board" to keep the F18A inside the main PCB outline. This is an available option when ordering and F18A. @ Note3: These systems are known to require USR4 jumper removed because the main system uses the CPUCLK output from the VDP as the main system clock. ************************ F18A FIRMWARE Change Log ************************ F18A V1.9 Dec 31, 2018 (CRC: 147A) * Prepare for open source release. * Split up the original "core" to create a top-module for the stand-alone F18A, and a "main core" that can be used as part of a larger SoC. * Fixed the VGA horizontal timing error caused by treating the pixel time as 40ns instead of 39.68ns. Because events were being counted in "pixels", this caused the horizontal sync pulse to be slightly off, and the overall line time to be 32us instead of 31.746us. This error meant each line was around 6.4 pixels too long, and pushed the total frame rate to 59.2Hz. This error was enough to cause games to fail (Pole Position on the 99/4A), and some monitors to not sync properly when run through video converters. The timing error also caused many problems for the PAL ColecoVision. * Removed sprite-linking. This was an unused feature and helped free up FPGA resources to allow the core to better fit in the Spartan-3E 250K. * Removed programmable GROMCLK divisor. Unused feature, free up resources. * Register mode and cd_i inputs to CPU component. V1.8 - Aug 24, 2016 (CRC: F981) * Fixed sprite collision bug where sprite collisions were being incorrectly detected outside of the active display, after line 191 or 239 depending on the line mode. * Added hybrid VR write restriction to mask VR writes to three-bits when the F18A is locked, like the real 9918A does. However, if mode bit M4 is set (80-columns), writes to VRs over VR7 are *ignored* instead of masked to three-bits. This allows various 9938 programs to work (or continue to work), as well as continue to support TurboForth that writes to VRs 0..15 to set up 80-columns (if straight masking was used, VRs 8..15 would over-write VR 0..7). V1.7 - Jan 1, 2016 (CRC: A3B5) * Fixed Bitmap-Layer (BML) display bug * Fixed GPU's PIX instruction to properly calculate BML addresses * Added power-on graphic that shows the current firmware version V1.6 - Apr 26, 2015 (CRC: 40CC) * Removed fixed tile functionality * Removed border scroll limit functionality * Removed banner functionality * Removed host-side 32-bit counter * Removed host-side 32-bit RNG * Removed GPU 32-bit counter * Removed GPU 32-bit RNG * Removed the sprite "disable value" (>F8) in the sprite Y-location when ROW30 is enabled. * Added second tile layer with its own NTBA, h/v page sizes, and h/v scroll regs * Added ECM2/3 pattern table size selections for tiles and sprites. * Added host-side segmented counter with 10ns accuracy. * Added configurable HSYNC and VSYNC GPU triggers. * Added fat-pixel (2x1) with 16-color support to the bitmap layer (BML). * Added 1x1 page scroll support for T40 and T80 modes. * Added option to reset most VDP registers to their power-on values. * Added option to disable Tile Layer 1, which includes GM1, GM2, MCM, T40, and T80. Sprites, the BML, and TL2 are still active and can be enabled/disabled independently. * Added option to allow attribute byte to be fg/bg color select in T40 and T80. * Added per-position tile attribute support. * Added DMA capability to the GPU: 8xx0 - MSB src 8xx1 - LSB src 8xx2 - MSB dst 8xx3 - LSB dst 8xx4 - width 8xx5 - height 8xx6 - stride 8xx7 - 0..5 | !INC/DEC | !COPY/FILL 8xx8 - trigger FILL (active high) will read a single byte at the src address and fill the destination with that byte. src, dst, width, height, and stride are copied to dedicated counters when the DMA is triggered, thus the original values remain unchanged. * Added USR3 jumper to control GROMCLK/CPUCLK output on pin37 to provide support for 9128/29 * Added USR2 jumper to disable/enable simulated scan lines (every other VGA scan line has its color reduced by 50%.) Also controllable via a new VDP register bit. * Added a 5th sprite reporting option instead of reporting the max-sprite, which on the F18A might be different than the original VDP because all 32 sprites can be on a single scan line. * Added a new register (VR51) to limit the maximum sprite processed. This has nothing to do with the number of sprites that can be visible on a scan line, which is controlled by a separate register (VR30). This register is always active and can be used instead of the >D0 byte in the sprite Y-location, and is the only way to limit sprite processing early when ROW30 is enabled. * Changed the GPU interlock so that polling the VDP status register will not cause the GPU to pause. This should greatly increase GPU performance during heavy VDP interrupt polling. * Fixed T80 NTBA two LSbit problem. They are ignored (set to "00") when the F18A is locked to provide compatibility with the 9938 and avoid problem with software that set the two LSbits of the NTBA to other than "11" as the 9938 documentation specifies they should be. This limits the T80 name table to 4K boundaries. When the F18A is unlocked, all 4-bits of the NTBA are used and the T80 name table can be located on 1K boundaries. * Fixed the 5th number update during a scan line. As long as the 5S flag is zero, the 5th number register follows the sprite scanning sequence. Seems to be a transparent latch that follows the input (current sprite being scanned) until latched by the 5S flag. If the status register is being polled and 5S is reset mid frame, then the 5th number begins following the scanned sprites again. This bug is known to have affected Miner49er on the 99/4A. V1.5 - July 2013 Not really a *bug* fix since the problem it corrects exists on the real 9918A, and only has to do with sporadic collision bit reporting during heavy polling of the original 9918A VDP status register. This was discovered while Rasmus was writing Titanium. The 9918A was not designed to have its status register polled which is why it provides an interrupt output. I don't think the original 9918A designers took the hazard into consideration, but I decided to make this correction because it is what the original designers would have done given their preference (and I asked Karl Guttag about it). Thus, the F18A implements what you would consider the "expected behavior", and will work as expected where the original 9918A might not. I did not make this decision lightly. V1.4 - April 2013 Fixed the sprite collision bug and a GPU bug with the divide circuit. The sprite bug is mostly affected by XB when a program uses CALL COINC(ALL). Most assembly games probably don't rely on the collision bit alone for sprites and perform coordinate testing, which is most likely why the bug slipped through all the testing (and I tested with a *lot* of games on a lot of platforms). V1.3 - July 2012 Original release firmware. ******** UPDATING ******** The In-System firmware update is available for 99/4A users. I am very thankful to Rasums and Tursi for their help in making this possible. You can download the F18AUpdate_vXX.zip file below. Detailed instructions are available on my website here: http://codehackcreate.com/archives/418 Alternatively you can update your F18A in any system via a JTAG programming cable. You can purchase a JTAG programming cable for about $59 USD from Digilent: JTAG HS3 programming cable/ This is very inexpensive for a JTAG cable (my Xilinx-brand cable was over $250!), and Digilent makes quality gear. You also need the Xilinx ISE-Webpack tools: http://www.xilinx.com/support/download/index.htm This is a free download from Xilinx, but it is BIG! About 6GB the last time I checked. There is a smaller download that contains just the programming tools called "Lab Tools" and is only about 1G. I'm still looking for a smaller / simpler solution. You will have to create an account (which is free). The primary program you need is called IMPACT and is used to program the FPGA and SPI-flash. Once you get the tools installed, download and unzip the f18a_250k_vXX.zip file. In the zip file you will find the MCS file: f18a_250k_vXX.mcs The .mcs file is used to update the SPI-flash ROM attached to the FPGA. Here are the quick instructions. The term "system" means your 99/4A, ColecoVision, MSX, etc., and "PC" means the modern personal computer you are running the Xilinx tools on. 0. Make sure your system is powered OFF to begin 1. Open your system to get physical access to the F18A 2. Plug the JTAG programmer in to your PC (via USB) and the F18A (via JTAG) 3. Power ON your system 4. Launch the Xilinx IMPACT tool 5. Double-click on "Boundary Scan", then right-click in the main area and select "initialize chain" 6. The FPGA should be detected and show up in the big area. A window will open with device properties, just click "ok" 7. Above the FPGA icon should be a dotted line with "SPI/BPI ?" in it. Right-click on that box and select "Add SPI/BPI Flash..." 8. Navigate to the f18a_250k_vXX.mcs file you extracted from the .zip file and choose "Open" 9. Select "SPI PROM" and "M25P80" from the two drop-down selections and click "OK" 10. The box above the FPGA should now say "FLASH" in it. Right-click the box and select "Program" Once the programming is finished, cycle power on your system and make sure it comes up. ******** Examples ******** Included in the zip file is a demos disk that shows many of the enhanced features of the F18A. The source for all the programs are included. I did not write these programs and I am very thankful to Rasmus and Tursi for contributing them. rasmus_scroll.zip F18A documentation.pdf f18a_register_use.zip F18A_V19.zip
  7. Not sure if anyone here has the knowledge to have a discussion on a technical level concerning the MSX standard. But I have a few questions concerning the various slot signals. 1) I see very few references to the SW1 & SW2 signals, other than they should be connected together on the cartridge pcb. However, no mention of where they go, or what they do. I'm assuming that there is some bit in some register set or reset. But I can't find any reference to it. Anyone have any idea? 2) As far as CS1, CS2, and CS12, I am assuming that these three select lines function independent of individual slots? I.e., they should be active on all slots at the same time, and not gated to specific slots? 3) SLTSL seems fairly easy to generate. My understanding is that the register A8h provides the 2-bit slot number for pages 0-3 of the 64k of memory. So I should be able to use a 1-to-4 decode on A15 & A14 to create my page select lines, and then just gate them properly with the A8h register to have the possible outcomes. (Been working on a truth table, but it going to be fairly extensive. This could probably be implemented with a fairly fast EEPROM for the logic). I understand how the decode works I think. I just want to verify I am not missing anything here. Any traps for noobs? If you're wanting more information as to the scope of what I'm doing, I am designing an expansion adapter for my MSX1 to open up Slots 2 & 3, possibly decoding one to the 4 secondary slots.
  8. Hello friends, I recently came into some new Super Famicom hardware, including two mystery controllers that I absolutely cannot find any information on. I suspect they are nothing special but I'd like to be sure. This forum seems like the perfect resource, full of knowledgeable folks who might be able to identify such things. Please see attached images. The controller is called the "Master Blaster" which really complicates getting a decent google search. I have two, non-functional and one functional but in need of silicon repair. I don't have the means to try and fix the non-functional one. Just wondering if some museum would benefit having these before I potentially get rid of em. Thanks!
  9. To the Odyssey 1 (1972) community: I'm excited to be able to be able to release 10 copies of our new game pack for the Odyssey. It includes three brand new games, a newly designed game card with an attached controller, and the first ACC controller besides the original light gun. These kits are 100% hand-assembled. The overlays are full laser prints on translucent film; no transparencies (which do not display properly), no ink (which can smear), and no undersized or partial overlays. These are all the full, original Magnavox size for 19in screens. Note that we do not have the ability to manufacture 26in overlays. The Tannhauser Gate overlay includes a fully opaque element (the black hole), which is applied as a separate, opaque layer of special material to the back of the overlay. To learn more about the games and hardware, see this thread. To learn more about the OdysseyNow project, see this thread. The entire set of hardware and games comes in the following cylindrical case: Complete list of contents: OdysseyNow Game Pack cylindrical case Card 13 Card 13 Switch Controller Damocles Controller Damocles Controller power supply Tannhauser Gate overlay Tannhauser Gate instructions Tannhauser Gate cards (3 decks) Fukushima overlay Fukushima Meltdown Cycle card Fukushima instructions Super Cat and Mouse: Cheesy Castle overlay Super Cat and Mouse instructions Bonus Game: Trumpocalypse instructions Needless to say, nothing like this has ever been released for Odyssey before, and we are proud to push the platform forward, 47 years after the console's release! The price is $150 for the set, plus shipping. At only $50 per game, plus substantial new hardware, this is less than the other significant homebrews of the past. However, I am only releasing 10 copies, so this is an extremely limited release. I just want to get a few copies of our work out there for people to enjoy; we don't have the capacity or interest to manufacture large numbers. Any money we bring in from this release will go straight into further game and hardware development; we are not doing this for profit. All items have been manufactured and will ship within one week of your purchase. To purchase, PM me with your Paypal email address and shipping address and I'll send you a Paypal invoice. The first 10 payments received will get the set. Any others will be canceled/refunded. I'll update this post when all 10 copies have been sold. Thanks for your interest and support of the Odyssey!
  10. I've been meaning to start a topic about my abbuc hardware competition entry, a replacement for the Pokey chip. It's been mentioned in a couple of threads but I thought many people may have overlooked it. I tried to be sensitive to cost in my design, though once the full details are released (after competition result) it will be fun here to brainstorm ideas to make it even cheaper! Clearly there are still plenty of real pokey chips, however the supply is starting to become more limited and prices are on the increase. --- PokeyMAX Introduction The PokeyMAX is a complete replacement for the Pokey chip. It is derived from the work on the EclaireXL project, a complete FPGA based Atari 800XL clone. The intention is to build replacements for all of the Atari custom chips using this technology and Pokey has been built first. It can be used either to replace a broken/missing pokey, as a stereo upgrade, or just for fun! Features If pokey is socketed, zero wire installation (mono) Dual pokey mode Pins for 3 audio outputs (left channel/right channel/mixed) Small footprint, only a few mm larger than original IC Supports all features: 8x paddle inputs, IRQ, serial I/O, audio output, two tone mode, high pass filter and keyboard scan High level of compatibility Digital logic The PokeyMAX is built around the Altera MAX10 FPGA. This was chosen due to its integrated flash memory, power conversion, small size and low cost. The contained logic itself is described in VHDL and Verilog and then synthesized using the Quartus II software. Level conversion Most modern FPGAs no longer support 5V logic. While it is possible to find a few they are a vanishing breed. The MAX10 only supports up to 3.3V logic, so an IDT quickswitch level converter IC is used to connect to the high speed lines (A/D/IRQ/serial io etc) safely. Chip select Unfortunately I needed more level conversion lines than provided. TI came to the rescue with some 5V tolerant multi-function logic chips with which I was able to combined CS/!CS into one. Power The MAX10 requires a single 3.3V power supply, it then internally generates the rest of its supplies. This is very convenient, since often FPGAs require 3 or more different voltage levels. There is a switch mode regulator (LM3670) to convert from 5V to 3.3v in an efficient fashion. Paddles These are handled by charging a capacitor that we then check the level of using an LMV339. This is similar to the well-known LM339 comparator, except much smaller! The comparator is used since the level can be set very precisely rather than relying on when the FPGA detects a logic high. The level itself is set to 2.2v using the voltage divider on the right. It is also convenient since its open drain output means there are no level conversion issues. For the drain transistors, a 5V tolerant IO extender chip is used. The FPGA communicates with this over an I2C bus. Keyboard scan An IO extender chip drives the 6 keyboard lines and then reads the response. This is convenient since it only requires an I2C bus to the FPGA and the IC is much smaller than the level converters. JTAG The core may be upgraded or debugged using an Altera USB blaster connected here. Several of the JTAG pins are dual use and can be used as general IO. So we could for instance in future plug in i2c devices here or use for A5 (with external level converter) to allow quad pokey or sid etc. Audio filter The audio output uses a delta sigma dac. An RC circuit is used as a simple audio filter to smooth the output from this. There are four audio outputs, which are currently fed to pin 37 and 3 header pins (left/right and mixed). Note that the next stage much not draw a lot of current from the rc filter or it will cause distortion. A4 Pokey has 4 address pins (A0-A3). To make space for a 2nd pokey another address line is needed. For stereo connect to A4. Errata: Note that the "paddle capacitors" should not be populated and RA1 should be 0 ohm since these are already on the main board, this was a schematic error.
  11. I still have the orig Playstation I purchased in 1996. It's worked quite well over the years. I modded it long ago. A year or so ago the occasional CD would not load or load slowly. I assumed drive was about to give up the ghost. Then the machine wouldn't spin at all and the display would flicker repeatedly. I assumed a PSU failure had taken place -- replace it with an eBay unit (with a blue LED) and that problem went away. But the CD-ROM drive problem got worse. Finally I couldn't load anything. It sounded like a spin issue. So, I bought a replacement new mechanism on eBay and installed it. I hear spinning and seeking, but the spinning doesn't last as long as it should and the seeking sounds stuttered -- as if it's having trouble focusing - not normal. So I looked and there was no other seller of such parts so I rolled the dice and purchased ANOTHER mechanism from the same guy and it's the same thing. Spinning that slows down -- I can hear like 5 spins per second before it stops, and it won't load anything. The seek sound sounds labored also. This is the unit and vendor I twice purchased for my SCPH-1001: https://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-OPTICAL-LASER-LENS-MECHANISM-for-SONY-Playstation-SCPH-1001/360534474878 Does anyone have any advice here? For whatever reason I'd like to keep this unit working rather than buying a used, modded PS1. Thanks. bp
  12. From the album: ADTX 2.5inch SCSI to IDE HD adapter

    ADTX 2.5inch SCSI to IDE HD adapter, hard drive above with adapter attached below
  13. SavyIsJoshoArts

    Oink! PAL

    From the album: Atari 2600 Gameplay on YPbPr Component

    High Score on Activision's Oink! Played on my Atari 2600 4-Switch Woodgrain Console modded using TimWorthington's 2600RGB Mod showing it in YPbPr Component Video Output.

    © SavyIsJoshoaArts aka Activision Man

  14. From the album: Atari 2600 Gameplay on YPbPr Component

    My high score on Activision's H.E.R.O. played on my woodgrain 4-Switch Atari 2600 using YPbPr Component Video Output.

    © SavyIsJoshoArts aka Activision Man

  15. I used TI Extended BASIC and 32K RAM expansion to write games and create music in the 1980s, and I'm trying to easily resurrect this content 35 years later. There are a variety of emulators and gizmos like the CatWeasel, but before I go too far, I'm wondering if there is a setup that can handle all these requirements: - Ability to read original 5-1/4" disks - TI Extended BASIC required - 32K RAM exapansion required - Games include custom "data" (strings of custom music and graphics) which must be periodically loaded during gameplay... not just code...this must be accessed using the "INPUT" (with files) command I'm trying to decide upon the right approach: 1. Repair or replace my original hardware and get it to run it on the original platform 2. Try to build a conversion / emulator system and bring these files into the 21st century 3. Find someone with existing conversion capabilities who might be willing to help I assume someone could help a software restoration newbie like me navigate the technical gotchas? The content is mainly text parser adventure games (rather goofy ones at that) and music and graphic utilities I authored myself. Thanks for all sage advice!
  16. So a friend picked up a Vectrex with a few games recently while on vacation. Worked great when he tested it at the seller's house. Placed the system in his trunk, drove home from Florida (we're in Tennessee), and then tried playing with it again once he got home. Only this time, it wouldn't come up. When he turned the power knob, the only indication that it was getting power at all was a bit of static when adjusting the volume knob. That initially led me to believe that it was something to do with the vibration or possible jarring in the trunk on the ride home that might have caused it to stop working. So he gave it to me to take a go at fixing it since I have at least basic electronic repair skills. I did a bit of research and went through all the basic repairs: popped open the case, discharged the tube, pulled, polished, and reseated all the removable ICs, re-flowed the 4 power pins coming in from the power board to the logic board, cleaned the power pins, checked the voltages coming into the logic board (got all good readings of -5, +5, and -13 reading from the PCB), and just did some general cleanup of the 30 years of crud that had accumulated on the board and in the case. Still no dice. I wanted to see if the monitor was lighting up at all, so I turned off all the lights in my office, then fired up the Vectrex. Sure enough, after turning it on and waiting 10-15 seconds, I gradually saw a little white dot rising from the bottom of the screen and coming to a stop a bit northeast of center. When I turned off the power, the white dot illuminated a bit brighter for a split-second, then immediately went away (rather than slowly fading out like my working Vectrex does at power-down). That behavior makes me think it's most likely to be a capacitor problem, but I wanted to check here with the experts before making any assumptions and dropping money on a cap kit that may be either unnecessary or futile. Of course, I don't know if that would necessarily explain why the BIOS (or whatever) doesn't still fire up and play the little musical ditty on startup. My own uninformed theory is that, even though the voltages are reading good, it's possible that bad capacitors on the power board are not supplying the amperage that the logic board or tube needs. Ok! Now that my own highly-amateur insights are done with: Any advice on how to proceed? Other places to check for voltages that might help? Maybe there are pics I could take and share that would assist with the diagnosis? I'm determined to resuscitate this glorious little black box, but I need some nudges in what is presumed to be the right direction. Thanks in advance!
  17. Trying to find more information and photos about the line of telephones Atari was working on in the early 1980s. It's fascinating stuff, but Atari Museum has very little information. Does anyone know where the prototypes have gone (thinking the trash, but hoping otherwise)? Are there more, higher quality photos? Did the kiosk ever make it out of the Atari offices? Thanks all!
  18. In my effort to provide documentation for lynx, I've started a new task : "vectorisation" of the Atari Lynx Schematics. I've done it with KiCAD. The schematics are based on the 4 part of Atari Lynx Hardware Schematics This is not the "final" version. Some parts were hard to read/understand. If you see any mistake, please feel free to report it. Schematics v0.1.pdf
  19. http://retroconsoles.wikia.com Hello everyone, I'm the administrator of Retro Consoles Wiki (there I go by ITEM-3), a brand new website whose goal is to collect all the scattered information for repairs and mods for all video game consoles, especially older consoles. This includes high-quality pictures of every revision of each console's motherboard, identification of the chips, and links to their documentation. Related information like controllers, accessories, flashcarts, console clones, and general tips for working with electronics will eventually be a part of it. The site is just over a week old and has mostly been an effort on 4chan's /vr/ board (thread: http://boards.4chan.org/vr/res/694016), and so there isn't much content yet, but it is an ongoing project, and more content is being added everyday. It's hosted on Wikia for now, but I will move the site to paid hosting if more people start using it. Here are a couple examples of the types of pages and guides that are currently on the site: Sega Genesis motherboard info: http://retroconsoles.wikia.com/wiki/Sega_Genesis_Hardware 3DO FZ-10 Repair: http://retroconsoles.wikia.com/wiki/3DO_FZ-10_Repair_-_Lubricate_the_Laser_Sled I'm here to spread the word about the wiki and see if anyone would like to contribute or make a request for specific content. If you have a complicated issue with a console that you have not been able to repair, I encourage you to create a page detailing the problem. I'd like to hear any suggestions you might have for the site as well. I hope to see you all there!
  20. go through this sellers list to find some interesting atari st stuff, seems to be listing more of it as well. eBay Seller: regalservice
  21. Asking on behalf of a friend: Out of curiosity, I was wondering if there are any expansions for the Atari 800, much in the vein of the expansions we have for the Atari XL/XE computers (RAM expansion, etc.) The Atari 800 maxes out officially at 48K RAM, which isn't enough for most of the homebrew games and such that target 64K+ RAM systems. I remember reading a long time back about some RAM expansions and such that do work on the Atari 800, but it's been ages and I'm wondering if most of that information is still relevant or not. One I remember reading about was the Incognito card (?), which gave the 800 a nice RAM boost. I *think* that was the name of it? (see what I mean by it's been ages? ) Anywho, can anyone point me to some good expansions that target the good old 800 computer that may still be available for purchase somewhere? I don't need anything like a SIO2SD or an Ultimate Cart; those are handled already.
  22. So I have a CX2600 model that has some issues with a controller port. The left port always registers the button as being constantly pressed or not pressed at all. The joystick still works fine. I've tried multiple controllers and none of them work in the left but they all function in the right. I was wondering if anyone could help me diagnose the issue and potentially find a solution.
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