Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'mame'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Atari Systems
    • Atari 2600
    • Atari 5200
    • Atari 7800
    • Atari Lynx
    • Atari Jaguar
    • Dedicated Systems
    • Atari 8-Bit Computers
    • Atari ST/TT/Falcon Computers
  • Gaming General
  • Marketplace
  • Community
  • Game Programming
  • Site
  • Classic Gaming News
  • The Club of Clubs's Discussion
  • I Hate Sauron's Topics
  • 1088 XEL/XLD Owners and Builders's Topics
  • Atari BBS Gurus's Community Chat
  • Atari BBS Gurus's BBS Callers
  • Atari BBS Gurus's BBS SysOps
  • Atari BBS Gurus's Resources
  • Atari Lynx Programmer Club's CC65
  • Atari Lynx Programmer Club's ASM
  • Atari Lynx Programmer Club's Lynx Programming
  • Atari Lynx Programmer Club's Music/Sound
  • Atari Lynx Programmer Club's Graphics
  • The Official AtariAge Shitpost Club's Shitty meme repository
  • The Official AtariAge Shitpost Club's Read this before you enter too deep
  • Arcade Gaming's Discussion
  • Tesla's Vehicles
  • Tesla's Solar
  • Tesla's PowerWall
  • Tesla's General
  • Harmony/Melody's CDFJ
  • Harmony/Melody's DPC+
  • Harmony/Melody's BUS
  • Harmony/Melody's General
  • ZeroPage Homebrew's Discussion
  • Furry Club's Chat/RP
  • PSPMinis.com's General PSP Minis Discussion and Questions
  • PSPMinis.com's Reviews
  • Atari Lynx 30th Birthday's 30th Birthday Programming Competition Games
  • 3D Printing Club's Chat
  • Drivers' Club's Members' Vehicles
  • Drivers' Club's Drives & Events
  • Drivers' Club's Wrenching
  • Drivers' Club's Found in the Wild
  • Drivers' Club's General Discussion
  • Dirtarians's General Discussion
  • Dirtarians's Members' Rigs
  • Dirtarians's Trail Runs & Reports
  • Dirtarians's Wrenching
  • The Green Herb's Discussions
  • Robin Gravel's new blog's My blog
  • Atari Video Club's Harmony Games
  • Atari Video Club's The Atari Gamer
  • Atari Video Club's Video Game Summit
  • Atari Video Club's Discsuuions
  • Star Wars - The Original Trilogy's Star Wars Talk
  • DMGD Club's Incoming!
  • DASM's General
  • AtariVox's Topics
  • Gran Turismo's Gran Turismo
  • Gran Turismo's Misc.
  • Gran Turismo's Announcements
  • The Food Club's Food
  • The Food Club's Drinks
  • The Food Club's Read me first!
  • The (Not So) Official Arcade Archives Club's Rules (READ FIRST)
  • The (Not So) Official Arcade Archives Club's Feedback
  • The (Not So) Official Arcade Archives Club's Rumor Mill
  • The (Not So) Official Arcade Archives Club's Coming Soon
  • The (Not So) Official Arcade Archives Club's General Talk
  • The (Not So) Official Arcade Archives Club's High Score Arena
  • Adelaide South Australia Atari Chat's General Chat & Welcome
  • Adelaide South Australia Atari Chat's Meets
  • Adelaide South Australia Atari Chat's Trades & Swaps
  • KC-ACE Reboot's KC-ACE Reboot Forum
  • The Official Lost Gaming Club's Lost Gaming
  • The Official Lost Gaming Club's Undumped Games
  • The Official Lost Gaming Club's Tip Of My Tounge
  • The Official Lost Gaming Club's Lost Gaming Vault
  • The Official Lost Gaming Club's Club Info
  • GIMP Users's Discussion

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Calendars

  • AtariAge Calendar
  • The Club of Clubs's Events
  • Atari BBS Gurus's Calendar
  • ZeroPage Homebrew's Schedule

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website


Facebook


Twitter


Instagram


YouTube


eBay


GitHub


Custom Status


Location


Interests


Currently Playing


Playing Next

Found 62 results

  1. Are there are keyboard stickers available for the TI-99/4a to make emulation with MAME easier? I'm referring to stickers like this for the Atari: https://www.4keyboard.com/commodore-keyboard-stickers/591-commodore-atari-non-transparent-keyboard-stickers.html I also have a thread about it here (for the Atari stickers): https://atariage.com/forums/topic/225142-atari-8-bit-sticker-for-sale/ TI emulation in MAME works great, but the keyboard layout isn't great. I know I can change the default layout, but stickers like this would be very useful. Adam
  2. I'm trying to use MAME 0.224 to create a disk image. I have my PEB setup with 32K and disk drives. My options to create a disk image are: TI99 sector dump TI99 track dump among other (see this screenshot): Which one should I use? I would like to be able to share these disk images with the NanoPEB and other TI-99/4a emulators, if possible. Adam
  3. So, finally got to using a newer version of MAME/MESS than 0.152 with 0.197 installed from the repositories. I'll likely eventually upgrade it to the trunk, but for now, I've got bigger fish to fry. Trying a MESS script copied from the old computer throws all kind of errors, which brings me to a point: **this is why I often feel unmotivated to upgrade things - because useless and unnecessary changes seem to be the order of the day**. Anyway, now that I have that off my chest, here's an example script from the MESS days: mess64 ti99_4ev \ -peb:slot3 speech \ -peb:slot4 samsmem \ -peb:slot5 pcode \ -peb:slot6 tirs232 \ -peb:slot8 hfdc \ -hard1 ~/mess/TI-HD.hd \ -gromport multi \ -cart1 ~/mess/ti_carts/extended_basic.rpk \ -cart3 ~/mess/ti_carts/editor_assembler.rpk \ -cart4 ~/mess/ti_carts/ti-writer.rpk Changing "mess64" to "mame' and attempting to launch the following segments "peb" and "hard1", "hard2", etc give errors, and MAME doesn't start. Of course, I've already done a bit of investigating, noticing that for some arbitrary and pointless reason "peb" now has to be the more verbose "ioport:peb". I'm still having trouble with "hard1", and didn't find solution for that. And I'm sure there are other erroneous syntax in this script that used to work perfectly. Any advice / help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for reading!
  4. MAME 0.224 Are you ready kids? MAME 0.224 (our August release) is out now! As always, there’s plenty to talk about. First of all, the Magnavox Odyssey² and Philips Videopac+ G7400 have had a major overhaul, with many graphical errors fixed, most software working, and support for the Chess and Home Computer modules. The Gigatron 8-bit homebrew computer, created by the late Marcel van Kervinck and based entirely on 7400-series logic chips, is now working with graphics and controller support. Acorn 8-bit expansions continue to arrive, with several additions for the BBC Micro and Electron. Speaking of expansions, regular contributor F.Ulivi has delivered serial modules for the HP Integral PC and HP9825/HP9845 families. Analog arcade audio continues to advance. If you’ve played Namco’s Tank Battalion, ancestor of the NES classic Battle City, you’ll be acutely aware of the limitations of the sample-based audio. That has been addressed this month, with netlist-based audio emulation. For Midway, 280 ZZZAP sound has been further refined, and netlist-based audio has been implemented for Laguna Racer and Super Speed race, which use similar circuitry. Sega G-80 games have received some long-overdue attention, with netlist-based audio added for Astro Blaster, Eliminator, Space Fury and Zektor, as well as better Universal Sound Board emulation for Star Trek and Tac/Scan, and more accurate CPU timing. Other games receiving netlist-based audio are Destroyer and Flyball from Atari, and Fire One and Star Fire from Exidy. On the topic of audio emulation, the ultra low cost GameKing now has preliminary sound emulation, making the games feel more complete. Work on UK gambling systems has continued, with several more Barcrest, BWB and JPM games working in this release. There are also a number of new European gambling games, including several Cherry Master and Jolly Joker sets. A significant number of arcade driving games have had additional internal layouts optimised for use on wide aspect ratio displays added. Other advances in home computer emulation include Apple IIe RGB monitor mode support, Apple II CMS SCSII II card support, and proper emulation speed for the VTech Laser 500. As always, there’s far more happening than we have space for here, and you can read all about it in the whatsnew.txt file, or get the source and 64-bit Windows binary packages from the download page. Read the rest of this entry »
  5. MAME TI 99-8 & TI 99-2 full usable download I have put together a workable MAME TI 99-2 & TI 99-8 packages. Just download and execute the batch file in the MAME directory. The 99-2 & the 99-8 never made it market for TI but they got fairly far along to the point of workable prototypes and even manuals (download manuals from http://ftp.whtech.com/datasheets%20and%20manuals/ ). The 99-2 works fine as is. It only has 4k of memory, no sound and B/W. Bo sure to use only the disk in the DISK directory. The sectors are different than the standard TI .DSK files. To access the disk use: OLD HEXBUS.101.SOMEFILE to save files use SAVE HEXBUS.101.SOMEFILE (somefile is your file name). there is a small file on the DISK BASIC-proj.DSK (the batch auto loads this disk) named HELLO. To load type OLD HEXBUS.101.HELLO In the batch file I kick off a text file that pops up next to the MAME screen with the 99-2 function keys and a vbs script that turns on the upper-case when the 99-2 starts and turns it of when the 99-2 ends. All this pertains to the 99-8. What is different about the 99-8 is the requirements from the PC. A i5 or i7 is required to work fast enough. I have set the 99-8 to work with my i3 in the batch file by skipping 1/2 the frames with -frameskip 30. If you have a i5 or i7 you can reduce this or eliminate it. Also, to keep the sound from stuttering I have set -audio_latency 34. If you have a faster machine, again, this can be changed of eliminated. I you have a PC slower than a i3, forget about it. Download the latest MAME at https://www.mamedev.org/release.html then add the data from the .ZIP files to the MAME directory. Here are the files: TI99-2.zip TI99-8.zip Have fun, HLO
  6. MAME 0.223 MAME 0.223 has finally arrived, and what a release it is – there’s definitely something for everyone! Starting with some of the more esoteric additions, Linus Åkesson’s AVR-based hardware chiptune project and Power Ninja Action Challenge demos are now supported. These demos use minimal hardware to generate sound and/or video, relying on precise CPU timings to work. With this release, every hand-held LCD game from Nintendo’s Game & Watch and related lines is supported in MAME, with Donkey Kong Hockey bringing up the rear. Also of note is the Bassmate Computer fishing aid, made by Nintendo and marketed by Telko and other companies, which is clearly based on the dual-screen Game & Watch design. The steady stream of TV games hasn’t stopped, with a number of French releases from Conny/VideoJet among this month’s batch. For the first time ever, games running on the Barcrest MPU4 video system are emulated well enough to be playable. Titles that are now working include several games based on the popular British TV game show The Crystal Maze, Adders and Ladders, The Mating Game, and Prize Tetris. In a clear win for MAME’s modular architecture, the breakthrough came through the discovery of a significant flaw in our Motorola MC6840 Programmable Timer Module emulation that was causing issues for the Fairlight CMI IIx synthesiser. In the same manner, the Busicom 141-PF desk calculator is now working, thanks to improvements made to Intel 4004 CPU emulation that came out of emulating the INTELLEC 4 development system and the prototype 4004-based controller board for Flicker pinball. The Busicom 141-PF is historically significant, being the first application of Intel’s first microprocessor. Fans of classic vector arcade games are in for a treat this month. Former project coordinator Aaron Giles has contributed netlist-based sound emulation for thirteen Cinematronics vector games: Space War, Barrier, Star Hawk, Speed Freak, Star Castle, War of the Worlds, Sundance, Tail Gunner, Rip Off, Armor Attack, Warrior, Solar Quest and Boxing Bugs. This resolves long-standing issues with the previous simulation based on playing recorded samples. Colin Howell has also refined the sound emulation for Midway’s 280-ZZZAP and Gun Fight. V.Smile joystick inputs are now working for all dumped cartridges, and with fixes for ROM bank selection the V.Smile Motion software is also usable. The accelerometer-based V.Smile Motion controller is not emulated, but the software can all be used with the standard V.Smile joystick controller. Another pair of systems with inputs that now work is the original Macintosh (128K/512K/512Ke) and Macintosh Plus. These systems’ keyboards are now fully emulated, including the separate numeric keypad available for the original Macintosh, the Macintosh Plus keyboard with integrated numeric keypad, and a few European ISO layout keyboards for the original Macintosh. There are still some emulation issues, but you can play Beyond Dark Castle with MAME’s Macintosh Plus emulation again. In other home computer emulation news, MAME’s SAM Coupé driver now supports a number of peripherals that connect to the rear expansion port, a software list containing IRIX hard disk installations for SGI MIPS workstations has been added, and tape loading now works for the Specialist system (a DIY computer designed in the USSR). Of course, there’s far more to enjoy, and you can read all about it in the whatsnew.txt file, or get the source and 64-bit Windows binary packages from the download page.
  7. How do I start a ROM in MAME where the bankswitching type is detected wrong? Is there a commandline parameter where I can provide the bankswitching type?
  8. MAME 0.222 MAME 0.222, the product of our May/June development cycle, is ready today, and it’s a very exciting release. There are lots of bug fixes, including some long-standing issues with classics like Bosconian and Gaplus, and missing pan/zoom effects in games on Seta hardware. Two more Nintendo LCD games are supported: the Panorama Screen version of Popeye, and the two-player Donkey Kong 3 Micro Vs. System. New versions of supported games include a review copy of DonPachi that allows the game to be paused for photography, and a version of the adult Qix game Gals Panic for the Taiwanese market. Other advancements on the arcade side include audio circuitry emulation for 280-ZZZAP, and protection microcontroller emulation for Kick and Run and Captain Silver. The GRiD Compass series were possibly the first rugged computers in the clamshell form factor, possibly best known for their use on NASA space shuttle missions in the 1980s. The initial model, the Compass 1101, is now usable in MAME. There are lots of improvements to the Tandy Color Computer drivers in this release, with better cartridge support being a theme. Acorn BBC series drivers now support Solidisk file system ROMs. Writing to IMD floppy images (popular for CP/M computers) is now supported, and a critical bug affecting writes to HFE disk images has been fixed. Software list additions include a collection of CDs for the SGI MIPS workstations. There are several updates to Apple II emulation this month, including support for several accelerators, a new IWM floppy controller core, and support for using two memory cards simultaneously on the CFFA2. As usual, we’ve added the latest original software dumps and clean cracks to the software lists, including lots of educational titles. Finally, the memory system has been optimised, yielding performance improvements in all emulated systems, you no longer need to avoid non-ASCII characters in paths when using the chdman tool, and jedutil supports more devices. You can read about all the updates in the whatsnew.txt file, or get the source and 64-bit Windows binary packages from the download page.
  9. IDE for developing in TI99 Assembler on the PC (Windows) (using NotePad++ Editor, xdt99 Cross-Assembler and MAME Emulator) https://github.com/miriki/TI-xdt99-IDE/ Hi, all! A few may have noticed: In an xdt99 thread I have published a Batch for DOS that shortens a lot of typing work when developing software. After years of abstinence from the TI99 I actually remembered the "good old days" developing tools and libraries again and tried to recall what I was doing those days. Well, 35 or so years... Firing up the MAME emulator, using TI99_4ev as machine, a cartridge with Editor/Assembler inserted and the needed disk in DSK1 mounted I started typing a few lines while reading through a bunch of books and forum articles. Hmmm... A PC keyboard and the function keys of the TI99, two worlds collide. Yes, the editor _was_ a very good one, at least that days. But nowadays I really, really prefer the comfort of NotePad++ or at least any other GUI based editor. Then I've read about the one or another Cross-Assembler to develop in Windows and using the output to mount within MAME. Almost right from the beginning I got stuck with xdt99, a collection of not only a cross-assembler, but other tools like a "disk creation", too. An integration into "IntelliJ IDEA" sounded good, but.... Hmmm... Maybe I have not digged deep enough, but there is only the editor used for syntax highlighting, isn't it? Putting things together: A batch for DOS (Windows, Microsoft, sorry...) was created that enabled the workflow from editing the Assembler source code assembling the source code into object code creating a disk which contains the object file starting an Emulator with this disk mounted plus a few more tasks... To be honest: I don't like DOS batches with more than, let's say, 25 or so lines. The syntax is ugly and the CLI commands are far from comfortable - not comparable with a high level language. Changing default values is a pain, (re)storing user settings a tremendous effort and doing all with user parameters results in a jungle of % characters shattered across the lines. So I used that batch only as a sketch for a "real" project: An IDE for those tools written in a high level language. I decided on C# (VB.Net would have been the alternative), because it is the preferred language right now in our company. Training... If anybody would like to have a look at it: I just published that project on GitHub. That was kind of training, too. We use Azure DevOps in our company and I have to get familiar with those cloud based team thingy. So hopefully I published correctly - it is my first published project over there. https://github.com/miriki/TI-xdt99-IDE/ This is the main page of the project. There is a README, but empty as of now. You will find a subfolder "TI xdt99 IDE" though... There is a subfolder "snap" which contains a few screenshots of the published project: Settings_Xdt.png shows the settings to include the tools from the xdt99 package. Settings_Mame.png shows parameters for the emulator, including configuration of the peripherals etc. Settings_Ide.png shows the standard working area with buttons to start actions and checkboxes to set options. Output_CommandStack.png shows the list of calls to external tools like the editor, assembler etc. Output_Standard.png shows the standard output of the last command, for example the directory of the disk. Output_Errors.png shows the error output of the last command, if there is any. Emulator_AutoStart.png shows the XB output from DSK1.LOAD if "catalog" and "autostart" is checked. Output_Result.png shows the loaded and started demo program I was just working on. Another subfolder "publish" contains a "setup.exe" that should install the IDE. I'd like to get feedback, if that thing runs without any problems. But what has to be done? Well... Perhaps it is best to show my setup: E:\TI99 mame64.exe >roms ti99_*.zip >hash ti99_cart.xml (thanks again, mizapf!) >cart editass.zip minimem.zip exbasic.zip >disk *.dsk >hard *.chd This should be enough to start MAME using e.g. ti99_4ev as machine. Try it... mame64 ti99_4a If successful, try inserting a cartride: mame64 ti99_4a -gromport single -cart exbasic If successful, try connecting a peb with a hfdc in slot 8, a disk drive connected and a disk inserted: mame64 ti99_4a -gromport single -cart exbasic -ioport peb -ioport:peb:slot8 hfdc -ioport:peb:slot8:hfdc:f1 525dd -flop1 disk/flopdsk1.dsk whew... After the first start of MAME there will be a few more subdirs like cfg, nvram etc. You might like to start MAME with -createconfig and edit the output mame.ini to suit your needs. I added cart and cart2 subdirs to the roms path, disabled the info screen at startup and the like... Then I added a subdir >xdt99 xas99.py xdm99.py xbas99.py >lib vdptools.a99 >projects >gmode gmode1.a99 etc. The "lib" folder contains a "vdptools.a99" file right now. There are only a few routines to avoid "BLWP VSBW" etc. in it. The "projects" folder contains the, as you already might have guessed, projects I am working on - for example a "gmode" subfolder. And in the "gmode" folder there are gmode1.a99, tmode.a99, mulcol.a99 and bitmap.a99. With this setup the settings on the XDT and MAME tabs should be self explanatory, kind of... The right hand side shows extensions for the filenames. For example the source "gmode1" gets expanded to "gmode1.a99" for the editor, is compiled into "gmode1.obj" and will become "GMODE1O" when copied to the TI disk. You may change the settings on the MAME tab and can use the IDE purely as a frontend, if you like. The "run" button will start the emulator without fiddling around with an assembler or anything else. BTW: Settings are loaded at startup of the IDE and saved when the IDE is closed or any external program is called. The IDE tab is the "all singing, all dancing" desktop for your development. The left box lists all subdirs aka projects, the right box lists the source files in that (selected) project. The selection is shown additionally in the two textboxes in the upper right (for later extensions). The "edit" button starts the editor, the "assemble" buttons starts the xdt99 cross assembler. It creates the object, image and rpk files, if checked. If "all" is checked, not only the actual selected source but all within the project will be assembled. The "disk" button creates the disk to be mounted for the emulator. It copies the source, list, object and image files, if checked. Again: For "all", if checked. Additionally it can create a DSK1.LOAD to show the contents of the disk and / or load and run the object file of the selected source. The "emulator" button starts the MAME emulator with the configured devices. If set up properly you might select "TI Extended Basic" from the master selection, get the disk contents displayed and after "please wait..." the compiled program should start. The "ADE" button is a shortcut: (A)ssembler, (D)iskManager and (E)mulator - all in one shot. So after editing / saving the source the test only needs 1) click on "ADE" button, 2) any key at the master title screen 3) "2" for XB, then wait... and enjoy! The menu at the top has no function as of now. The status bar at the bottoms shows info about running external tools to the left, "idle" to the right otherwise. Have fun! Michael
  10. MAME 0.221 Our fourth release of the year, MAME 0.221, is now ready. There are lots of interesting changes this time. We’ll start with some of the additions. There’s another load of TV games from JAKKS Pacific, Senario, Tech2Go and others. We’ve added another Panorama Screen Game & Watch title: this one features the lovable comic strip canine Snoopy. On the arcade side, we’ve got Great Bishi Bashi Champ and Anime Champ (both from Konami), Goori Goori (Unico), the prototype Galun.Pa! (Capcom CPS), a censored German version of Gun.Smoke, a Japanese location test version of DoDonPachi Dai-Ou-Jou, and more bootlegs of Cadillacs and Dinosaurs, Final Fight, Galaxian, Pang! 3 and Warriors of Fate. In computer emulation, we’re proud to present another working UNIX workstation: the MIPS R3000 version of Sony’s NEWS family. NEWS was never widespread outside Japan, so it’s very exciting to see this running. F.Ulivi has added support for the Swedish/Finnish and German versions of the HP 86B, and added two service ROMs to the software list. ICEknight contributed a cassette software list for the Timex NTSC variants of the Sinclair home computers. There are some nice emulation improvements for the Luxor ABC family of computers, with the ABC 802 now considered working. Other additions include discrete audio emulation for Midway’s Gun Fight, voice output for Filetto, support for configurable Toshiba Pasopia PAC2 slot devices, more vgmplay features, and lots more Capcom CPS mappers implemented according to equations from dumped PALs. This release also cleans up and simplifies ROM loading. For the most part things should work as well as or better than they did before, but MAME will no longer find loose CHD files in top-level media directories. This is intentional – it’s unwieldy with the number of supported systems. As usual, you can get the source and 64-bit Windows binary packages from the download page. This will be the last month where we use this format for the release notes – with the increase in monthly development activity, it’s becoming impractical to keep up.
  11. MAME 0.220 In a world of uncertainty, perhaps you can derive a little comfort from MAME 0.220, our delayed release for the March development cycle. This month has seen fixes for some old bugs in Final Star Force, Ribbit! and Night Slashers, emulation of Crab Grab (the other Game & Watch title with a colour overlay), the acquisition of Solite Spirits (an early version of what became 1945k III), and preliminary work on the Naruto TV game running on the XaviX 2 platform. There are some big software list updates this month, including a lot of Apple II software aimed at North Dakota schools, and the latest VGM music packs. Speaking of which, the VGM player can now show pretty visualisations while you listen. Newly supported peripherals include the Baby Blue II CPU Plus card for PC compatibles, serial and CP/M modules for the HP 85 and HP 86, more sound and disk expansions for the TI-99 family, the CoCo PSG cartridge, and a variety of 8-bit Acorn expansions. We’ve added ROM dumps for a lot of synthesisers in this release, and while most of them are not working yet, they’re there to tinker with if you’re interested. As always, you can get the source and 64-bit Windows binary packages from the download page.
  12. MAME 0.219 MAME 0.219 arrives today, just in time for the end of February! This month we’ve got another piece of Nintendo Game & Watch history – Pinball – as well as a quite a few TV games, including Dream Life Superstar, Designer’s World, Jenna Jameson’s Strip Poker, and Champiyon Pinball. The previously-added Care Bears and Piglet’s Special Day TV games are now working, as well as the big-endian version of the MIPS Magnum R4000. As always, the TV games vary enormously in quality, from enjoyable titles, to low-effort games based on licensed intellectual properties, to horrible bootlegs using blatantly copied assets. If music/rhythm misery is your thing, there’s even a particularly bad dance mat game in there. On the arcade side, there are fixes for a minor but long-standing graphical issue in Capcom’s genre-defining 1942, and also a fairly significant graphical regression in Seibu Kaihatsu’s Raiden Fighters. Speaking of Seibu Kaihatsu, our very own Angelo Salese significantly improved the experience in Good E-Jan, and speaking of graphics fixes, cam900 fixed some corner cases in Data East’s innovative, but little-known, shoot-’em-up Boogie Wings. Software list additions include the Commodore 64 INPUT 64 collection (courtesy of FakeShemp) and the Spanish ZX Spectrum Load’N’Run collection (added by ICEknight). New preliminary CPU cores and disassemblers include IBM ROMP, the NEC 78K family, Samsung KS0164 and SSD Corp’s Xavix 2. As always, you can get the source and 64-bit Windows binary packages from the download page.
  13. Hosted By Von Crap Tournament 7 is now open for registration: http://retrocontests.herokuapp.com/#/ Participants will be prompted to sign up for the site before they can register for the tournament. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Crap Tournament is a yearly MAME competition where all the titles are selected based on their relative obscurity or overall lousiness. Every year brings in new pure crap and some hidden gems - you'll play some of the worst games ever made, and discover some amazing titles you never would've played without the tournament. The games are hilarious, but the competition is fierce. Think you're a true gamer? Come prove it in the Crap Arena. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Dates for the Contest: The tournament will last 10 days, stretching over 2 weekends, beginning May 1st and ending May 10th. Number of Games The tournament will consist of 12 games, none of which will be announced until moments before the tournament start. Of these 12 games, 10 will be announced at the start of the tournament, while the remaining 2 will only be announced at the beginning of the closing weekend (May 8th). Proper game settings will be detailed for each title. Scoring Format The scoring format is simple: 12 points for first on any given title, 11 points for 2nd,... 1 point for 12th, and points are only awarded for places 1 through 12. Thus, a prefect score for this tournament would be 144, regardless of the number of participants, and it's entirely possible to accumulate 0 points despite submitting a score for every game. In other words, the competition will be rough, and the winner will be the player who is the best all around crapper. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Once the tournament officially starts, an easy submission process, live updating standings for each game, and an overall leader board will become visible for all registered participants. As part of the submission process participants will have the option to attach an inp or link to a Twitch stream highlight. Either option is fine, and neither will be mandated unless the submission claims a 1st place. This will allow participants to easily update the scoreboard with their submissions as often as possible without getting bogged down making Twitch highlights for every score they obtain, but still maintain some element of interactivity on the scoreboard itself as 1st place scores begin to change hands. To be clear: streaming and creating Twitch highlights is not a requirement, recording inps is not a requirement, but 1st place score submissions will not be accepted without one of the two. (For me personally, recording and uploading inps is not in any way a nuisance, and I plan on doing so for every sore I submit. Making Twitch highlights, on the other hand, is a little time consuming and I only plan to do so for scores I don't intend to best later on in the contest.) All MAME versions 106 and later are legal for this contest (just be sure to specify which version was used when uploading inps), and if a player somehow actually has cab access to one of the crap titles they are of course welcome to play on the original hardware. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Get busy crappin' or get busy dyin'
  14. MAME 0.211 As we pass the half-way point of 2019, it’s time for MAME 0.211, with all the excitement that brings. In this release, SGI Indy and MIPS RC2030 workstations have been promoted to working. This is a major milestone in RISC workstation emulation. If you’re feeling nostalgic, why not try one of them out, and install IRIX or RISC/os, respectively? This release also includes better support for the China Education Computer Apple II derivatives, along with a preliminary software list. This opens a window to Chinese classroom technology in the late ’80s and early ’90s. Speaking of software lists, we’ve added over five hundred cleanly cracked Apple II software titles, and imported a whole lot of ZX Spectrum cassette images. Looking away from computer emulation for a moment, Game & Watch preservation keeps progressing, with the addition of Ball (the earliest Game & Watch release) and the panorama screen version of Donkey Kong Jr. The Gaelco/Salter Pro Cycle Tele Cardioline exercise system has been promoted to working, and the Pro Stepper system has been added. System 573 MP3 audio has been greatly improved in this release, and support has been added for more Bally pinball sound boards. ClawGrip added example programs from the V.R. Technologies VT03 software development kit. Gemcrush, a rare brick breaking arcade game, has been added in this release. There are lots of other improvements, including a fix for the fatal error when switching away from MAME in Direct3D full-screen mode. You can get the source and Windows binary packages from the download page.
  15. MAME 0.213 It's really about time we released MAME 0.213, with more of everything we know you all love. First of all, we’re proud to present support for the first Hegener + Glaser product: the “brikett” chess computers, Mephisto, Mephisto II and Mephisto III. As you can probably guess, there’s an addition from Nintendo’s Game & Watch line. This month it’s Mario’s Bombs Away. On a related note, we’ve also added Elektronika’s Kosmicheskiy Most, exported as Space Bridge, which is an unlicensed total conversion of the Game & Watch title Fire. If you haven’t played any of the handheld LCD games in MAME, you’re missing something special – they look superb with external scanned and traced artwork. On the arcade side, we’ve added The Destroyer From Jail (a rare Philko game), and alternate regional versions of Block Out and Super Shanghai Dragon’s Eye. The CD for Simpsons Bowling has been re-dumped, resolving some long-standing issues. With its protection microcontroller dumped and emulated, Birdie Try is now fully playable. Protection microcontrollers for The Deep and Last Mission have also been dumped and emulated. Improvements to Seibu hardware emulation mean Banpresto’s SD Gundam Sangokushi Rainbow Tairiku Senki is now playable, and sprite priorities in Seibu Cup Soccer have been improved. In computer emulation, two interesting DOS compatible machines based on the Intel 80186 CPU are now working: the Mindset Personal Computer, and the Dulmont Magnum. The Apple II software lists have been updated to include almost all known clean cracks and original flux dumps, and the Apple II gameport ComputerEyes frame grabber is now emulated. We’ve received a series of submissions that greatly improve emulation of the SWTPC S/09 and SS-30 bus cards. On the SGI front, the 4D/20 now has fully-working IRIX 4.0.5 via serial console, and a whole host of improvements have gone into the Indy “Newport” graphics board emulation. Finally, MAME now supports HDI, 2MG and raw hard disk image files. As always, you can get the source and Windows binary packages from the download page.
  16. MAME 0.212 It’s the moment you’ve surely been waiting for: the release of MAME 0.212! A huge amount of work has gone into this release in a number of different areas. Starting with the software lists, you’ll find hundreds more clean cracks for Apple II, the Rainbow on Disk collection for Tandy Color Computer, all the latest Game Boy Advance dumps, and thousands more ZX Spectrum cassette images. Chess computers now support chess piece simulation using the built-in artwork, support has been added for several more chess computers from Hegener & Glaser, Novag and Saitek, and the Tasc ChessSystem R30 is now working. Three Game & Watch titles, Bomb Sweeper, Gold Cliff and Safe Buster, have been added for this release. Protection microcontrollers continue to fall, with Rainbow Islands – Extra Version, Choplifter, Wyvern F-0, 1943: The Battle of Midway and Bionic Commando no longer needing simulation, hacks or patches. In some cases, the dumps have confirmed that the protection had been reverse-engineered correctly and the simulation was correct, but it's still important to preserve these programs. It’s also important for people repairing these systems if the original microcontrollers have failed. There are three important sound-related fixes in this release: FM Towns CD audio playback positions have been fixed, Konami System 573 digital audio synchronisation has been improved, and a special low latency mode has been added for the PortAudio sound module. For more advanced users and developers, more functionality has been exposed to Lua scripts and plugins. The layout file format has been overhauled to better support systems that make creative use of LEDs and LCDs. Disassembler support has been added for the Fujitsu F2MC-16 and National Semiconductor CompactRISC CR16B architectures. And if you've been following along, you might notice that we’ve waved goodbye to a little more of our C legacy with the removal of the [tt]MACHINE_CONFIG_START[/tt] macro and its associated crud. We don't have space to list all the Apple II and ZX Spectrum software list additions here, but they’re in the whatsnew.txt file. You get the source and Windows binary packages from the download page.
  17. hi can you help me delete non-working roms from mame i will pay add me on google pluse at [email protected] i will use TeamViewer for your help help and i will pay
  18. http://youtu.be/xXodUes3VHo Last weekend 45 crazy retro gaming fans showed up at the Metal Jesus Man Cave for live music, booze & fun. Here are the highlights in music video form. I ask the question: What 3 games would you take if stranded on a desert island?
  19. I am currently living in a small apartment, and my girlfriend will be moving in soon. In the interests of maximizing space, I am considering putting my numberous systems into storage and getting a nice emulation setup hooked up to my new TV. How anyone here ever done this, and did it work out for you? Now, what kind of a computer is needed for good emulation? I know next to nothing about hardware, and won't be building a machine. I'll just go to Best Buy when my tax refund comes back and buy a PC. Ideally, I would like to run stuff up to the Dreamcast era smoothly, if that can be done. If not, I'll settle for a machine that runs the classics. Any recommendations on an out-of-the-box machine that does the job? Also, any suggestions for controllers? Also, has anyone here had experience with a first-gen hacked Xbox? Thanks!
  20. ac.tomo

    MAME help

    Hi, I'm having ploblems getting my software to work on the mame emulator, of which various versions I've used, but don't seem to get anywhere. The biggest problems I get are: 1. Either I haven't created a MAME.INI file which I don't know how to do, or particular files can't be found, even though they've been put in the 'roms' folder. If anyone can help me with which mame emulator to download and software to download & any tasks I need to do I would be very thankful, thankyou.
  21. We have seen them a lot lately, people making multi-cades, where people have machines made with multiple titles in one machine, even original machines have been converted in this manner. its not uncommon now to find a machine, most likely with the artwork from the original, but with new internals and controls, and a board with many different games on it. My question is, how do you feel about people taking original arcade machines and converting them into multicades?
  22. MAME 0.210 It’s time for the delayed release of MAME 0.210, marking the end of May. This month, we’ve got lots of fixes for issues with supported systems, as well as some interesting additions. Newly added hand-held and tabletop games include Tronica’s Shuttle Voyage and Space Rescue, Mattel’s Computer Chess, and Parker Brothers’ Talking Baseball and Talking Football. On the arcade side, we’ve added high-level emulation of Gradius on Bubble System hardware and a prototype of the Neo Geo game Viewpoint. For this release, Jack Li has contributed an auto-fire plugin, providing additional functionality over the built-in auto-fire feature. A number of systems have had been promoted to working, or had critical issues fixed, including the Heathkit H8, Lola 8A, COSMAC Microkit, the Soviet PC clone EC-1840, Zorba, and COMX 35. MMU issues affecting Apollo and Mac operating systems have been addressed. Other notable improvements include star field emulation in Tutankham, further progress on SGI emulation, Sega Saturn video improvements, write support for the CoCo OS-9 disk image format, and preliminary emulation for MP3 audio on Konami System 573 games. There are lots of software list additions this month. Possibly most notable is the first dump of a Hanimex Pencil II cartridge, thanks to the silicium.org team. Another batch of cleanly cracked and original Apple II software has been added, along with more ZX Spectrum +3 software, and a number of Colour Genie cassette titles. That’s all we’ve got space for here, but there are lots more bug fixes, alternate versions of supported arcade games, and general code quality improvements. As always, you can get the source and Windows binary packages from the download page.
  23. MAME 0.204 After a busy four weeks, we’re ready to present the hotly-anticipated MAME 0.204 release. The most exciting stuff this month is definitely on the computer emulation side. We’ve added dozens of working cartridges to the BBC ROM software list, and ROMs required by expansion devices are handled more elegantly. Our HP9000/300 series emulation just keeps getting better: it’s now possible to install and use HP-UX 9, with X11 and the Vue desktop environment on an emulated HP9000/370 with accelerated window drawing and Ethernet networking support. There’s also been some progress on the road to Silicon Graphics workstation emulation. On top of that, we’re seeing preliminary emulation of standalone X Window System terminals. Thanks to MAME’s modular, device-oriented architecture, improvements for one machine go on to benefit other machines using similar hardware. The Motorola 68k memory management unit improvements that allow HP-UX to run on the HP9000/300 series will also benefit Mac, NeXT and early Sun systems. The same AMD LANCE Ethernet controller is used in HP and Sun workstations, X11 terminals, the Amiga A2065 Zorro card, and numerous applications. This gives us a wealth of test cases, and a virtuous cycle where progress on one system can lead to a breakthrough on another. With this release, all Tiger game.com games are fully playable. Two more Nintendo Game & Watch titles, Climber and Tropical Fish, have been emulated. XaviX-based TV game emulation continues to progress steadily: numerous e-kara karaoke cartridges have been dumped, preliminary sound output emulation has been implemented (sorry, no microphone support yet, but you can hear the tunes), and more systems have inputs connected. Graphical effects in the bootleg arcade driving game Blomby Car have been improved, and bad dumps of graphics ROMs for Abnormal Check and the Korean version of Prehistoric Isle have been replaced. As always, you’ll enjoy support for more alternate versions of arcade games (including a version of Pinball Action that shows scores on external LED displays), bug fixes, and general emulation improvements. You can read a more detailed account of this month’s changes in the whatsnew.txt file, or get the source and Windows binary packages from the download page.
  24. MAME 0.206 Welcome to 2019 – we’re starting the year with a bang! MAME 0.206 is an absolutely huge update when it comes to new dumps and newly working software, especially when it comes to TV games. As far as we know, MAME is the first V.Smile emulator with working controls and the most compatible, with almost all dumped titles fully playable for one player (the second joystick isn’t working yet). A number of JAKKS Pacific games based on similar technology are also working in this release. And from Japan, you can now play the Popira and Dance Dance Revolution Family Mat rhythm games, as well as Super Dash Ball. The Namco Nostalgia and Taito Nostalgia games are now playable, too. Game & Watch coverage is steadily expanding, with Black Jack, Lifeboat, Manhole (new wide screen), and Rain Shower added in this release. Black Jack is particularly notable as it hasn’t seen re-issue or emulation before now. On the arcade side, San Francisco Rush 2049 and its Special Edition have been promoted to working, and we’ve added alternate versions and bootlegs of several supported games. Heihachi_73 has tested the Aristocrat Mk V slot machines, and dozens have been promoted to working. If you enjoy spinning the wheels, why not give some a try? If you’re aware of the effort to preserve original Apple II software in the new low-level WOZ disk image format, it should come as no surprise that MAME is on board. We’ve started documenting these dumps in a software list, and we’ll continue to add dumps as they become available. If you’re a fan of Acorn computers, you might want to try some of the newly supported BBC Micro ROM slot expansions, including banked ROM devices, RAM expansions, and real-time clocks. A few additional Electron expansion devices have been added, too. Of course, these are just selected highlights, and there are plenty more bug fixes and emulation improvements in this release. There are also some incremental improvements to MAME’s system and software selection menus. You can get the source and Windows binary packages from the download page.
  25. i have been trying for a long time, but virtual trackball will not make my character move in mame4droid. is there anyway to make this work?
×
×
  • Create New...