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Found 26 results

  1. Did you ever enjoy playing with food coloring? I did, many times. And that, plus my lifetime fascination with computers inspired me to come up with this blog. These are the 16 colors from the Intellivision, rendered in McCormick Food Coloring. It uses the standard red/yellow/green/blue, plus the neon purple/green/pink/blue, and black. Black: 8 parts Black Blue: 7 parts Blue, 1 part Red Red: 7 parts Red Tan: 2 parts Yellow, 1 part Red, 1 part Green Dark Green: 10 parts Green, 1 part Blue, 2 parts Black Green: 6 parts Green, 3 parts Yellow Yellow: 7 parts Yellow White: None Gray: 3 parts Black, 1 part Neon Purple Cyan: 3 parts Blue, 1 part Green Orange: 3 parts Yellow, 3 parts Red Brown: 7 parts Yellow, 6 parts Red, 6 parts Green Pink: 2 part Red, 1 part Neon Pink Light Blue: 1 part Neon Blue, 1 part Neon Purple Yellow-Green: 3 parts Yellow, 1 part Green Purple: 7 parts Red, 3 parts Blue And here's what they look like. Notice that they look kind of pastel, but that's because I used an opaque white paint as my medium. That does it for this segment. Next time, I'm going to render MSX colors using food coloring.
  2. walker7

    Palettes

    From the album: The Best Assembly Computer

    A set of 7 different color palettes to use while programming.
  3. gulps

    Nes compare palette set1

    NES Palette comparison by Wavebeam.

    © http://wavebeam.blogspot.com.es/2017/03/wavebeam-nes-palette.html

  4. Short and Sweet version... The most complete and diverse palettes available; including not only "tint/hue" but internal console "pot adjustments" as well which in part accounts for variances between systems and displays. A range of brilliance and saturation levels are included too. Grab the complete set with below description and explanation here: GCCFINALXX_20130624.zip *UPDATED 6/24* - Additional color logic/decode for neutral "pot" palettes and improved naming convention. Detailed version... The GCCFINALXX palettes offer a robust range of settings with much diversity regarding color control. It includes "tint" adjustment (as typical found on a display's end-user controls) as well as "pot" adjustment (Color tuning found inside the 7800 console). Additionally, there is a range of color brilliance and saturation settings from the raw/base levels to extreme levels. Here is a typical file name: "NTSC_GCCFINAL1G_XTRBRT_LOWSAT.pal" It describes the palette in the following four areas: I. Region II. Palette Family Pot and Tint/Hue Setting III. Brilliance Setting IV. Saturation Level I. REGION: The region difference is noted by either NTSC or PAL in the file name. II. PALETTE FAMILY POT / TINT SETTING The difference respecting the "pot adjustment" is noted by either number 1, 2, or 3 in the file name: 1 = More Blue to Red, Less Blue to Green. 2 = Neutral 3 = More Blue to Green, Less Blue to Red. The difference respecting the "tint/hue setting" is noted by either a letter G, N, or R. G = More Green N = Neutral R = More Red Complete Color Base line: GCCFINAL1G = TINT is more green / POT is more blue over red, less blue over green GCCFINAL2G = TINT is more green / POT is neutral GCCFINAL2G-ALT = TINT is more green / POT is neutral (Alternate color logic) GCCFINAL3G = TINT is more green / POT is more blue over green, less blue over red GCCFINAL1N = TINT is neutral / POT is more blue over red, less blue over green GCCFINAL2N = TINT is neutral / POT is neutral GCCFINAL2N-ALT = TINT is neutral / POT is neutral (Alternate color logic) GCCFINAL3N = TINT is neutral / POT is more blue over green, less blue over red GCCFINAL1R = TINT is more red / POT is more blue over red, less blue over green GCCFINAL2R = TINT is more red / POT is neutral GCCFINAL2R-ALT = TINT is more red / POT is neutral (Alternate color logic) GCCFINAL3R = TINT is more red / POT is more blue over green, less blue over red III. BRILLIANCE: The level of color brilliance or brightness is noted using the following: LOW = Base/Raw Level MED = Average Level XTR = Extreme Level Complete Brilliance Line (Least to Greatest) = LOWBRT, MEDBRT, XTRBRT IV. SATURATION: The level of color saturation is noted using the following: LOW = Base/Raw Level MED = Average Level XTR = Extreme Level Complete Saturation Line (Least to Greatest) = LOWSAT, MEDSAT, XTRSAT A few final thoughts...Keep in mind that your current display device (Computer monitor can have a slant/push) may result in you choosing a palette that could seem like an unlikely candidate or choice. For example, have you ever read a review where they says the monitor has, not a red, but a "pink push", or "too much pink"? The actual issue may be there is a stronger than expected or accustomed to blue over red ratio. In that scenario, you may want to counter it with one of the GCCFINAL3X palettes depending on how strong the monitor's slant/push is of "pink". Or if you have a display with a red push, you may want or/and need to counter it with one of the GCCFINALXG palettes. Then again, your current display may be perfectly color calibrated and it is the original 7800 system or device you play(ed) it on that leans or slants in a certain direction regarding colors as a result of the pot adjustment or television configuration. It's all factors to keep in mind when trying the select a palette that looks 'right' to you. Please note too, one palette may look just right for one game and very wrong for another. A few titles there is little noticeable changes (I.E. Dig Dug) among a slew of different palettes. In other titles, each palette will make a obvious and distinct difference (I.E. Xenophobe). ENJOY!
  5. Since her sister Maria received new clothes and Stella received new clothes, it was only a matter of time. Download the Atari 5200 palette files here: Pam2XX_Palettes_20131108.zip The 'Pam' palette files are presented with the same options as the 'Maria' palette files. There is a "base" palette plus the following options: x0 = Saturation Increase x1 x2 = Gamma Increase and Saturation Deltas x3 x4 x5 = Gamma and Saturation Increase with Contrast Deltas x6 x7 x8 = Saturation Increase with Contrast Deltas x9 Also like the Maria and Stella palettes, we have Phase Shifts 24.7 through 27.7 degrees in 0.5 degree increments. In addition to palette files with the '*.pal' file extension, the complete set above is also presented with the '*.act' file extension (Used with Atari 5200 emulators such as Atari800Win Plus, Jum52, & kat5200). Phase Shifting examples follow utilizing the x0 [saturation increase only] NTSC palette in the following order... Pam247NTSCx0 --> Pam252NTSCx0 --> Pam257NTSCx0 --> Pam262NTSCx0 --> Pam267NTSCx0 --> Pam272NTSCx0 --> Pam277NTSCx0. Pole Position: Joust: The next few are highlighting the two ends of the phase shift spectrum and a logical 'middle' ground (See explanation below): Pam247NTSCx0 --> Pam262NTSCx0 --> Pam277NTSCx0 Astro Chase: Moon Patrol: Mr. Do's Castle: Ms. Pac-Man: Pitfall II: Here are examples showcasing the different options within each phase shift. Phase Shift 26.2 degrees is selected in this order: PAM262NTSC --> PAM262NTSCx0 --> PAM262NTSCx1 --> PAM262NTSCx2 --> PAM262NTSCx3 --> PAM262NTSCx4 --> PAM262NTSCx5 --> PAM262NTSCx6 --> PAM262NTSCx7 --> PAM262NTSCx8 --> PAM262NTSCx9 Frogger: Pitfall: Color Bars with Reference from PAM Diagnostic [sALT] Cart v1.1: Pam247NTSC --> Pam252NTSC --> Pam257NTSC --> Pam262NTSC --> Pam267NTSC --> Pam272NTSC --> Pam277NTSC. GTIA CHIP - NTSC C014805 Official Document Color Order: Atari 5200 Field Service Manual: Per the technical documents referenced above the following can be deduced: Directions were given for the color just below and above the (grey) reference bar to be within one shade of each other. Under the same reference document, directions are given for it to be the same color. Phase Shift 25.7 degrees - matching Hue 1x, 15x and the color below the reference grey bar fits making it the same color. Accounting for system 'warm-up'/phase shifting as well as the instructions for it to be within one shade of each other would make Phase Shift 26.2 a realistic logical choice. It also collaborates with the official document color order: Hue 1x = Gold, Hue 2x = Orange, Hue 15x/F$ = Light-Orange; Phase Shift 26.2 places Hue 15x/F$ between Hue 1x, gold and Hue 2x, orange; a light orange in color. Here is an alternative capture of the color bars from the PAM Diagnostic [sALT] Cart v1.1 with Phase Shift 26.2 degrees in place by utilizing the 'Pam262NTSC' palette within kat5200's NTSC video simulation mode along with a few game captures: (Click on the capture to remove some of the distortion) Hue 1x for NTSC is intended to be gold, not green-yellow/yellow-green. Gold is how Hue 1x appears under a CRT - the original and intended display device for the system. A green-yellow/yellow-green Hue 1x is how the NTSC 5200 palette is manipulated and modified (in part) under a modern flat panel (I.E. LCD/LED/Plasma) display. The above harmonizes with what has been documented for the Atari 2600 and Atari 7800 systems as well, regarding their NTSC color palette. Although there is no Atari 5200 PAL system the palettes offered in the download for the PAL region are theoretical ones based upon how the colors align under the Atari 7800 PAL system (Since Atari 5200 NTSC and Atari 7800 NTSC share essentially the same palette when viewed on a CRT). However, it should be noted that PAL 8-bit (400/800) Atari computer systems appear to provide the same - or an *extremely* similar - palette of NTSC Atari 5200 consoles displayed on a CRT. Additionally, that would also mean that Atari 8-bit NTSC and PAL palettes are the same (Or extremely similar) from at least the 'base' level. Once actually processed through display circuitry from their respective region as well as slight hardware system differences (There is an additional oscillator for 8-bit PAL systems driving color frequencies), other items such as NTSC color 'artifacting' would not be present under PAL. A thorough summary of Atari 2600/5200/7800 console system palettes is here.
  6. Attached are files and associated data that demonstrate how colors appear from various NTSC systems on a Commodore 1702 display with all controls at neutral/default; it is renowned for its rich, deep color depiction. Extremely similar if not seemingly identical to it, includes such displays as a Magnavox CM8762 (074G). Atari 2600: Atari 5200: Atari 7800: C64: ColecoVision: NES: Each system listed is provided with palette hex data as well as a palette file or/and respective RGB data. Palette files support such emulators as Stella, kat5200, ProSystem, WinVice, puNES, Nestopia, etc. Additionally, for some of the listed systems, there is source code modifications (denoted by a "!" in front of the filenames), included for the MAME emulator and corresponding forks. Trebors_C1702_Palettes_20171217.zip Results are very good when viewed raw, but most excellent when applied against NTSC/CRT filters and shaders if available.
  7. ...After you press the power button? Let's see... 1-3 SECONDS --> 15-30 SECONDS --> 1 MINUTE 2 MINUTES --> 5 MINUTES --> 8 MINUTES 20 MINUTES --> 1 HOUR --> 5 HOURS ANSWER... It is Phase Shifting. Yeah, you know what this means... More coming soon.
  8. Download the palettes here [updated 8/30]: 2X7-PROSYSTEM_20130830.zip The '2X7-PROSYSTEM' palettes (25.7 degrees --> 26.7 degress --> 27.7 degrees)... NTSC: PAL: Why? Technically the phase shift of the 7800 is ~25.7; actually, 25.714 according to the math here... https://sites.google.com/site/atari7800wiki/rgb (Thank you Eric Ball). The reality though is most (all?) 7800 systems fluctuate the phase shift higher as the system 'warms up'; additionally there is a variable resistor which also impacts the ultimate end results. The color references affected the most - and consequently most noticeable - are values E$ and F$. At the 25.7 setting colors 1$ and F$ match near exact. To the naked eye they in fact look exact. According to the books this would be proper having a 180 degree color-burst resulting. However, even a new system I obtained within the last year does not stay at that degree. There is a deviation from it, resulting in the shift going higher than 25.7 degrees. The question is how much greater do we go? Simply stated, color F$ more realistically ends up between the hue of Color 1$ and 2$; darker than 1$, but lighter than 2$. If we set the phase two degrees higher (27.7) we end up with colors E$ and F$ as a near exact match of colors 1$ and 2$. Some systems, including one of my own, phases this much and even higher (~28.7) over several hours (To the point where E$ and F$ fall in between 2$ and 3$ in hue - and most other values almost look like they have shifted a complete row (I.E. 8$ starts to look like a 9$, 9$ starts to look like a A$, etc.); but now that is swinging the pendulum too far in the other direction. So, if 25.7 is technically accurate, but hardly remains the reality, and 27.7 brings too much of a phase shift to the palette, then a happy medium would be 26.7. Setting the phase to 26.7 we obtain a color F$ that is in between the hues of color 1$ and 2$. MESS, in fact, has F$ documented (Thank you Dan Boris) as a 'light orange' range, whereas 1$ is a 'gold' range and 2$ is a 'orange' range. Additionally, we obtain light browns from 1$, while now having darker browns set under F$. Looking at color E$ under the 26.7 setting, it falls right as a 'pea soup', the 'Linda Blair special', puke-ish green throughout; placing it in between a green and a brown color. Going back to 25.7 causes E$ to become a stronger green on the lower end, swinging the pendulum to 27.7 makes E$ a brown color. The often noted intension is for the E$ range to fall between a green and a brown; it is arguably better achieved at 26.7. The extensive work done in brightness, contrast, saturation with the literally hundreds of palettes created and viewed across half dozen displays, along with the input of the community, has helped achieved a nicely saturated and bright palette setting from the base values as shown above. That is easily adjusted and open to interpretation of course, so if you want something more/less saturated, brighter, etc...Just ask. Additionally, the "BASE" palettes are being included for those who perhaps just want the base values and/or like to self-adjust saturation, brightness, contrast, etc. BASE '2X7-PROSYSTEM' palettes (25.7 degrees --> 26.7 degrees --> 27.7 degrees)... NTSC: PAL: Unlike the GCCFINAL palettes, we are not looking to factor in a wide range of television tints or pot adjustments. These palettes presumes a properly calibrated/pot adjusted 7800 and a television which falls within a neutral tint setting - and expects similar from the monitor it is being displayed upon. It's almost a certainty that programming color choices were made on systems with a variety of phase settings as well. For instance, some games like Choplifter! and Midnight Mutants look better with a higher (27.7) phase shift, but others like Pole Position II and Joust look better with a lower (25.7) one. Here is a look at Choplifter! - (25.7 --> 26.7 --> 27.7): Notice how much better the sky and ground appear with a system that phase shifts higher. Here is a look at Joust - (25.7 --> 26.7 --> 27.7): Notice how bad the enemy bird wings look with a higher phase shift. They lose their green. Just to emphasize, the above are not utilizing any tint/hue control or manipulation. There is no manual changing of RGB values or proportions. This is not the same as a television display tint/hue control. This comes strictly from the console itself and is not a pot adjustment either. *Note to 7800 game developers: Avoid color E$ like the plague!* Interestingly enough, a 'perfect Fuji' (Enable the BIOS) demands '257-PROSYSTEM' - and it is the technically accurate ideal, if not actually experienced for a long duration of time. Here is the Fuji captured under NTSC (25.7 degrees --> 26.7 degrees --> 27.7 degrees): *The differences are likely less noticeable on a CRT especially when animated, but still worth noting* If you have a system that truly sticks to a 25.7 degree shift, it's covered here, as well as those going beyond, 26.7 degrees, up to 27.7 degrees. UPDATE 8/28: Received request for less saturated palettes. Lighter/less saturated palettes have been added. Here are the '2X7-PROSYSTEM-LT' palettes (25.7 degrees --> 26.7 degrees --> 27.7 degrees)... NTSC: PAL:
  9. What do you want? Atari 7800 colors... A. From a CRT TV...A7800_CRTTV.zip B. From a CRT TV with slightly less red, more green...A7800_CRTTVG.zip C. From a CRT TV with slightly less green, more red...A7800_CRTTVR.zip D. Direct from the console (For use in emulators which have YIQ/YUV CRT simulation), the raw base values...A7800_BASE.zip E. Simulate a system with color shifts when 'warm' on a CRT TV...A7800_WARM_CRT.zip F. Simulate a system with color shifts when 'warm' on a LCD TV...A7800_WARM_LCD.zip Side Notes: --------------- Three old palette sets renamed and three new ones added. Every group has a core palette plus 6 variations - 7 palettes total for a region within each group. A color chart for each palette was going to be included, but the smallest most practical size (x2 resolution) would have driven the size of each set from ~14KB to well over 500KB. For bandwidth and download considerations they are being left out. However, feel free to download the Color Demo ROM here: (Color Selector Demo (2003) (PD).zip It works fine for both PAL and NTSC, and the color charts will display. Absolutely, there is no definitive or final palette - but 42 different ones are provided here for each region, a total of 84 palettes! Background Details: ---------- ------- If interested in "why" this update, in part it is due to the error I mentioned earlier with starting with a PAL base and trying to create NTSC palettes from it. I ensured the front end (technically accurate 'raw' values) were set to the respective region after figuring out my error, but forgot to fix the back end (conversion to CRT). It resulted in an overall redder palette for FINAL (Which was renamed to the CRTTVR), that is within the reasonable tolerance shift, and of course allowed for yet another CRT palette to be a 'truer' less red/more green palette (CRTTVG). The former less red more green palette, ALT_FINAL is actually the neutral and renamed accordingly (CRTTV). The other two new palettes incorporate work in previous threads in harmony with a request fulfillment (WARM_LCD) as well as my own personal drive to achieve the color shift palette that has been documented and captured (WARM_CRT).
  10. ...but i can't draw! example: http://lpugh.deviantart.com/art/8-Bit-Firefox-Icon-215241134 am working on a game engine (for both Windows and Linux but mainly Linux) but not necessarily a game and am in desperate need of retro-themed or retro-styled 8 bit and or 16 bit images. non-game specific. doesn't matter. any format. any image. (even an found an icon that looks like an 8 bit version of the 24 bit firefox icon). help? sorry for the multi-cross-post but as my project is not game/machine specific...wasn't sure where to post it? O_o
  11. I was wondering, with all the different cartridge types, what defines the location where the storage is banked into? Is the logic in the Atari hardware, the OS or the cartridge itself? On the off-chance it is the latter, would it in theory be possible to have a cartridge which only banks a few bytes into the colour registers, allowing quick changes of colour palettes? Probably not possible, but just thinking outside of the box.
  12. From the album: Computer Food Coloring

    These are the 16 MSX/ColecoVision colors rendered in McCormick food coloring.
  13. This is the second installment in computer food coloring. This time, it's the MSX palette. It's also used on the ColecoVision, and the TI 99/4A. Therefore, it could be called the TI palette. It consists of 15 colors and a transparent color. Color 0 is Transparent. Black: 8 parts Black Medium Green: 9 parts Green Light Green: 5 parts Green Dark Blue: 7 parts Blue, 5 parts Neon Blue, 5 parts Neon Purple Light Blue: 2 parts Neon Blue, 2 parts Neon Purple Dark Red: 30 parts Red, 1 part Blue, 1 part Green Cyan: 3 parts Neon Blue Medium Red: 13 parts Red Light Red: 5 parts Red Dark Yellow: 8 parts Yellow, 3 parts Red, 2 parts Green Light Yellow: 3 parts Yellow Dark Green: 24 parts Green, 1 part Blue Magenta: 7 parts Neon Purple, 2 parts Green Gray: 2 parts Black White: None The transparent color was achieved by using plain water. The medium used was Sargent Art Art-Time white tempera paint, which is opaque. And here's how it turned out: That certainly looks cool! It's pretty accurate.
  14. New palettes for ProSystem - Maria247, Maria252, Maria257, Maria262, Maria267, Maria272, & Maria277! Download them here: Maria2XX_Palettes_20131016.zip Not to be outdone by her older sister, Maria has received some new clothes as well. Like the Stella palettes, we have Phase Shifts 24.7 through 27.7 degrees in 0.5 degree increments. Unlike the Stella palettes under the Stella emulator, Maria has no easy way to make adjustments to the base values when being utilized under the ProSystem emulator, as many video options are not present. So, in addition to the base values, three varieties of intensity accompany the set. Also, the Maria palettes have different files for each region. NTSC and PAL regions are included. After further investigation and research, it appears what seems to be 'automatic' pot adjusting while the system is running is simply just the phase shifting. It is better understood and captured at a lower/cooler start (24.7 degrees) and watching via gradual increases of 0.5 degree. Previous palettes only offered phase shifts 25.7, 26.7, and 27.7. This set is much more complete and thorough in covering the 7800's hues and their respective phases on a CRT better than any prior releases. Screen captures to follow are in this order: Maria247 --> Maria252 --> Maria257 (aka 180 degrees colorburst) --> Maria262 --> Maria267 --> Maria272 --> Maria277 Color Charts (NTSC) Color Charts (PAL) Color Grids (NTSC) Color Grids (PAL) Following screen captures provide an example difference of intensity in this order: Maria262 --> Maria262x1 --> Maria262x2 --> Maria262x3 Donkey Kong XM Bentley Bear's Crystal Quest Here's the Phase shifting in action shown in the following order: Maria247 --> Maria252 --> Maria257 --> Maria262 --> Maria267 --> Maria272 --> Maria277 Joust Scrapyard Dog Enjoy.
  15. Already having discussed the problem we have (http://www.atariage....2/#entry2659435) when trying to use the raw video output, straight RGB values coming from a NTSC A7800, in a palette for emulators which lack proper NTSC video emulation (especially YUV/YIQ support), what will be accomplished here is taking YUV/YIQ achieved colors turn them 'vibrant' and make hard RGB values from them. In that same thread here... http://www.atariage....2/#entry2659624... you'll notice that true NTSC/YIQ/YUV simulation created multiple shade for each color value. So we will take some of the greater values and make a VIBRANT palette from it. The palette will be bright and brilliant respecting red against green, and blue will be stronger relative to the RAW palette or even a default derived YUV palette. Again this is to simulate the colors many NTSC users likely saw from their analog CRT TV's favoring more vibrance. This end result being limited with just an RGB palette and no further video controls working off the RAW palette from the previously linked thread. MESS is closer to ideal: http://www.atariage....2/#entry2660238 but I know many like using ProSystem and wanted to provide this for the community. Here is the NTSC_A7800_YUV_VIBRANT palette and color chart: NTSC_A7800_YUV_VIBRANT.zip
  16. I'm not new to drawing sprites, but I am new to worrying about keeping things to 16 (15?) colors. I have a few questions, one regarding lynx specifications, and 1 regarding workflow in gimp which I am a little new to. 1) So I read that the lynx is limited to a 16 color palette per scene/level. I know you can get fancier with a few tricks, but I have no trouble working within those confines, as most commercial lynx games did. Along those lines, I thought I read something here in the lynx programming contest thread, that 1 of the 16 colors is set aside for transparency? In that case, when making sprites, is it true that I should then use only 15 of the 16 colors in the palette on the actual sprites, for the colors and parts of the sprite that I want displayed? 2) Gimp workflow: I have figured out how to create a palette by importing colors from a picture. How do I set a palette as the "only" colors for a picture - such that I could maybe drop in a sprite I have created without concern to the lynx palette, and have it forced into the limited palette I set? I know this isn't programming, but figured it belonged in this forum rather than the general lynx forum. Thanks for your help!
  17. Thanks to palettes that MrFish so kindly posted on another thread (here), it reminded me of this question: What would be some good universal palettes for 9 color gtia mode ? No Dli changes, no separate regions for different colors, any pixel can be any out of 9 colors. Besides going for simple solution similar to first 8 colors of C64 or Zx spectrum (Black, White, Red, Cyan, Purple, Green, Blue, Yellow) plus maybe Grey, what other combo would work well in some scenarios ? Something like platform game with lots of vegetation and earth would benefit from more brown and green colors. Something 'technical' in space would need more shades of grey for example. Bellow are example images scaled, cropped, converted to Atari pal palette and reduced number of colors to 9. My guess is that custom palette and new graphics could look even better. Turrican screenshot from Amiga: Dragon Ninja screenshot from Amstrad: What do you think ?
  18. New palettes for Stella - Stella257 & Stella267. Both palettes contain updated NTSC and PAL colors, SECAM retains the standard Stella settings. Stella257 has the 180 degree colorburst in place resulting in 1$ and F$ being a near exact match (Visually they will appear exact to most). Stella267 closer represents the standard Stella palette having a slight phase shift from the 180 degree colorburst, providing the most noticeable change to F$ - darker browns in comparison to 1$, and E$ - giving a more neutral balance between a green and brown hue, instead of a stronger green presence under Stella257. There is no manipulation of contrast, brightness, or gamma for these palettes. Stella has internal controls to handle that Download the palettes here: Stella2XX_Palettes_20130911.zip Screen captures to follow (click pics to enlarge and remove distortion) are in this order: Stella (Standard) --> Stella257 --> Stella267 Color Bar Generation (1984) (VideoSoft) (NTSC) 'Title Screen' & 'Color Bars' [Composite mode @ Stella default values] Color Test (26-09-2002) (Eckhard Stolberg) (NTSC) [Composite mode @ Stella default values] [TV mode disabled (AKA RGB)] Color Test (26-09-2002) (Eckhard Stolberg) (PAL) [Composite mode @ Stella default values] [TV mode disabled (AKA RGB)] Enjoy.
  19. To achieve a match of NTSC_A7800_CRT.pal under MESS 0.148 (Currently downloadable from here), make the following adjustments from default, ensuring hlsl is enabled: red_ratio 1.000000,0.300000,-0.300000 grn_ratio -0.150000,1.000000,0.150000 blu_ratio 0.150000,-0.150000,1.000000 saturation 1.500000 YIQ is disabled (As it is broken under 0.148) regarding the above values. Only title badly affected by this is Tower Toppler. If using another version of MESS with YIQ enabled, the above numbers need to be tweaked accordingly. If you fall into this category though, you're likely making adjustments to your display preference anyway including palette colors. MESS 0.148 has accurately stored the RAW video output of an NTSC Atari 7800 and you adjust video to personal preferences and experience as seen fit via slew of the video tweaks available. HLSL effects with all the bells and whistles turned on can require a relatively respectable graphics card. For just changing the above with no additional effects, a less powerful one is required. Most cards from the last 5 (Even as far back as ~7) years of a mid-level or better performance should suffice. See here for more details. To simplify things further for MESS here are all the files (BIOS, artwork, etc.) and basic settings you need for the palette NTSC_A7800_CRT working with hlsl. You want to unzip this archive in the same folder as your MESS executable: MESSA7800BASIC.zip Here is the same set of files with screen curvature, overscan, and scanlines: MESSA7800BELLS.zip Hope this is helpful.
  20. Short and sweet with difference from previous offerings: Final layer of A7800 NTSC palette generation applied incorporating the appropriate gamut color space and white point along with a corrected gamma curve which in turn impacted Hue/Tint begin and shift point. Here are all the NTSC palettes zipped along with some captures: ALL_FINAL_NTSC_PALETTES.zip Here is the color reference chart: File details: All palettes - the extra/overdriven ones ("EX" folder) and the plain/neutral ones ("NORM" folder) - are calculated palettes with no 'hand-picked' or 'manually manipulated' colors. Both batches contains a base (‘NTSC.pal’ or ‘NTSC_EX.pal’ respectively) along with a *very* gradual - one degree shifts - to either green or red; same as would be found on a NTSC display with a TINT/HUE control. The extra/overdriven palettes compared to the plain/neutral ones have a contrast increase of 20% and a saturation increase of 10%. Plain/neutral palettes have their contrast, brightness and saturation settings with no bias. There are a total of 62 palettes following this pattern: (MOST RED) NTSC_R15.pal...NTSC_R01.pal <---> NTSC.pal <---> NTSC_G01.pal...NTSC_G15.pal (MOST GREEN) or (MOST RED) NTSC_R15EX.pal...NTSC_R01EX.pal <---> NTSC_EX.pal <---> NTSC_G01EX.pal...NTSC_G15EX.pal (MOST GREEN) I'm still happy to take request, but this should cover most wants as best as possible without actual NTSC generation inside the emulator itself. I am working to have 'NTSC.pal’ palette incorporated into MESS as that is the most unbias with neutral settings and all other provided palettes are easily obtainable through adjustment of the provided emulator controls having the correct base in place. Dig Dug and Ms. Pac-Man (from Pac-Man Collection) are showcased below utilizing the following palettes in this order: NTSC_G07.pal <-> NTSC.pal <-> NTSC_R07.pal NTSC_G15.pal <-> NTSC_R15.pal & NTSC_G07EX.pal <-> NTSC_EX.pal <-> NTSC_R07EX.pal NTSC_G15EX.pal <-> NTSC_R15EX.pal This is really *it* and final this time. I hope you enjoy them and find this useful. & &
  21. ***UPDATE: Download the ENTIRE NTSC & PAL Atari 7800 set HERE. Original Post follows... This is relatively important, especially for our game developers I'm hoping this helps and makes color conversion from one format to another a bit easier. Download both raw color palettes here: There is no bias and both palettes share the following same attributes per standard Atari 7800 configuration without any display device influence (And no 'warm-up' factor). This is system cold/factory default settings as follows: Contrast = 0.05 Brightness = 0.00 Color = 0.22 Phase = 25.7 Colorburst = 180 degrees This NTSC palette and the ones to follow are brand new and never released before due to error on my part, but this PAL palette has been released before under a different name, again due to errors on my part. Again, they are both the 'raw' ones for their respective regions. Your input (especially PAL users as I am in NTSC land) is greatly appreciated for this thread. Thank You, Robert
  22. ...but i can't draw! example: http://lpugh.deviantart.com/art/8-Bit-Firefox-Icon-215241134 am working on a game engine (for both Windows and Linux but mainly Linux) but not necessarily a game and am in desperate need of retro-themed or retro-styled 8 bit and or 16 bit images. non-game specific. doesn't matter. any format. any image. (even an found an icon that looks like an 8 bit version of the 24 bit firefox icon). help? sorry for the multi-cross-post but as my project is not game/machine specific...wasn't sure where to post it? O_o (forum admins: please move and or delete posts as necessary)
  23. ...but i can't draw! example: http://lpugh.deviantart.com/art/8-Bit-Firefox-Icon-215241134 am working on a game engine (for both Windows and Linux but mainly Linux) but not necessarily a game and am in desperate need of retro-themed or retro-styled 8 bit and or 16 bit images. non-game specific. doesn't matter. any format. any image. (even an found an icon that looks like an 8 bit version of the 24 bit firefox icon). help? sorry for the multi-cross-post but as my project is not game/machine specific...wasn't sure where to post it? O_o
  24. There has been many threads and topics devoted to the colors of WinVice on a variety of forums; particularly for the NTSC region. The developers have certainly done tremendous work with the emulator and it is commendable. Even relatively recently, the following was performed respecting the video display: http://www.lemon64.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=596300#596300 It brought contrast and saturation to a default value of 1.250. It makes the current NTSC default display appear as follows: While indeed appreciated as a rather 'dull/muted' look is part of the issue with the way the NTSC display appears, there is another issue which was brought up previously that cannot be corrected properly through the video options offered via WinVice. The default red and blue ratios are not what many NTSC users experience. The worst and most evident being the amount of red applied to blue as noticed on the boot screen, but there are other issues as well. The testimony of many NTSC users on these boards as well as numerous online examples of the actual NTSC hardware running on official Commodore equipment (I.E. 1702) as well as other CRT displays makes this clearly evident: A shift of the tint value (More green/less red) will correct this (improperly) to a degree, but it also impacts the entire palette and will cause greys to look greenish as well as a slew of other undesired adjustments. Again, the main issue is red and blue ratio values, not something a tint/hue control can address the right way. So here is hopefully something to assist those NTSC users. This is not hand-picked or manually manipulated palette colors. Rather we take the default.vpl file values from WinVice and offer up the following comparison: Quickly looking over the chart especially the first three (Default, Default15, Default30) one may not notice much if any difference, but there is as we compare the various boot screens with the default and variety of ratio adjustments using the default user adjustable video option values of WinVice. *Note: All screen captures going forward are in the following order: default.vpl default15.vpl --> default30.vpl --> default15-15.vpl --> default30-30.vpl. Once an individual can figure approximately where their display falls in the spectrum, then other adjustments can be applied (Contrast, Brightness, Saturation, Tint). Here is what further difference the boot screen can appear with just contrast bumped up: You'll notice from the boot screen that the default15 and default15-15 does not appear to look different; ditto with the default30 and default 30-30. To truly notice the full range of what has changed and not changed (Or hardly changed) let's take two popular titles utilizing again the default user video option values: Bruce Lee G.I. Joe The differences from default and the four new default values should hopefully be much clearer. The issue (red/blue portions) is not unique to the C64 under the NTSC region. All three Atari systems (2600/5200/7800) and the NES (Both with vastly different ways of how their palettes are generated) experience a similar phenomenon. The only proper way to address it is with the option of modifying red, green, and blue ratio proportions, once a set of default values are obtained from the appropriate performed calculations. You'll notice that the percentage of 15% and 30% were utilized. Every 15% is where a very significant difference becomes apparent as highlighted in the captures. A higher percentage is possible but evidence of any online examples or personal experience of the ratios within a range greater than 30% is lacking. How to apply the different palettes: Copy the palette files to the C64 sub-folder found within the main folder where the main executable resides. (I.E. C:\WinVICE\C64) After copying the files you normally should be able to select them via the GUI interface: 'Settings' --> 'Video Settings' --> 'VICII Palette' tab. However, that appears not to work. An easy method is to just open the vice.ini file (Found in the main directory where the executable resides - i.e. C:\WinVICE) with Notepad and about a third of the way down you will find two lines: VICIIPaletteFile="default" VICIIExternalPalette=0 Change "default" to one of the new default files and change the 0 to 1. So for example if you wanted to try the "default15-15.vpl" file, the lines would be modified to: VICIIPaletteFile="default15-15" VICIIExternalPalette=1 Please make sure you save the file. Proceed then to launch WinVice and make whatever additional video changes you desire - contrast, brightness, saturation, etc. It would be wonderful to perhaps see these options/values incorporated and included in the WinVice distribution. To assist further and in aiding any who believe or desire to make manual adjustments to the default calculations here is the complete chart of palette values: Download the chart in Excel format here: CHARTDELTAS.zip Finally, the four new default palette files for WinVice can be downloaded here: WinVice_Default_Palettes_20131207.zip
  25. Building off the cumulative knowledge, experience, and feedback from the community, incorporating both phase shifts and pot shifts and have never taken into consideration before that not only can the colors phase shift during the duration of the consoles running time, they can also pot shift, here are the latest palettes, download includes nicely brighten and saturated palettes as well as their respective raw/base values: 2X7-X00_PALETTES_20130906.zip They are sorted by region and then phase value. Within each phase value (257, 267, 277) there is the pot adjustments (000 = Blue to Red More, 300 = Neutral, 600 = Blue to Green More). Despite how you set and calibrate the pot adjustment (Dial closest to the cartridge port), it may still end up leaning in one direction or another over time while running. It makes sense to me too, as it explains a while ago when I was calibrating the color on one of my 7800 consoles, I made the appropriate adjustment after it was running for a while, and then after closing it up, putting it back with the rest of my collection, and starting it up again the next day, the pot adjustment looked 'wrong' from the way I recall setting it. The below chart explains what each capture to follow is displaying. Additionally, you will notice a box is highlighted green; it is the one set with the technically accurate palette. It has a 25.7 degree phase shift along with the pot in the neutral position, leaning blue neither towards red or green more. Within ~2-5 minutes your system should ideally be right around that setting. However, over time the palette can, and for every system I have ever seen or heard about, does shift. How much it shifts and whether it is just the pot or just the phase or both seems to vary greatly. Below shows the color charts and some in-game captures. NTSC captures are on the left, and PAL captures are on the right. Just to be clear, there are no hue/tint adjustments to any of these palettes. These color changes are strictly what the console can do 'on its own' while the system is running: Going back to something mentioned earlier, the 26.7 palette setting still appears to be an ideal choice in accounting for what we know factually of the console shifting - and allowing a modest shift for it, as well as providing a happy medium to games that look ideal at 25.7 degree phase shift - such as Joust, Galaga, Pole Position II, and games that look more ideal under a 27.7 degree phase shift - such as Ikari Warriors, Midnight Mutants, Commando. Enjoy, and hope you find your palette match. I’m very curious of observations and feedback from our PAL community. Covering which is the closest to what is seen during both a short duration (Running ~5-10 minutes), and then what the colors look like after running for a longer period (~1 hour or more). Of course feedback from our NTSC users is always welcomed and appreciated as well, either via PM or this thread.
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