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Found 10 results

  1. gulps

    Analogue Nt Mini Gb LSDJ

    Testing "LSDJ" music tracker at the GameBoy (GB) core at Analogue Nt Mini.
  2. I've tried to get a sort of PWM sound in a tracker. And I don't mean an accidental effect, but something more or less stable and predictable. The idea is a development of Raster's idea from his 'Delta' cover and 'C64 synth' instrument. Here is a mediocre example, but I hope you can hear and see what is going on the first channel. XEX included as well. KORTO.xex
  3. EDIT: Updated to version 1.3 TIATracker is a tool for making Atari VCS music on the PC and a new sound routine for the VCS. It features ADSR envelopes, up to 7 melodic and 15 percussion instruments, customizable pitch guides for optimizing the number of in-tune notes, a size-optimized and configurable replayer routine and much more. The Windows binaries for version 1.3 as well as the manual are attached. Included are also three example songs, a few basic instruments and an example pitch guide. For Linux and OS X, use "wine" or compile the sources (they use Qt and SDL). The sources can be found here. Pouet link is here. I'm open for bug reports, feature requests or curses. TIATracker_1.3.zip TIATracker_manual.pdf
  4. There have been many people asking how to create music on the Intellivision and each thread is addressed individually. There is some good information on the IntelliWiki, but the format of the tracker is not described in detail. This thread endeavors to describe the tracker format in all its gory detail. The information in this article was originally provided to me by Arnauld Chevallier, author of the tracker library for the Intellivision. I have adapted and expanded it for publication. I've attached to this article an archive containing the source code for the Intellivision Tracker library, along with the original demo song provided by Arnauld Chevallier. I've also included a simple song taken from the Christmas Carol game for further illustration. Intellivision Tracker Lib.zip Technical Overview The Intellivision Master Component includes a General Instruments AY-3-8914 sound chip, commonly referred to as the Programmable Sound Generator, or PSG. The PSG contains three separate square-wave tone generators, each of which can be programmed individually to control its frequency and volume. The chip also includes a noise generator, which can be mixed with any of the three tone channels. All three channels, potentially modulated by the noise generator, are then mixed and fed to the TV for output. The PSG also contains a hardware envelope generator to shape the output sound-wave. Any of the three channels can be processed through the envelope generator, but only one envelope is available to all channels at a given time. The inability to shape each tone individually reduces the versatility and usefulness of this feature, often forcing the programmer to generate and manage discrete envelopes in software. Programming the PSG manually is certainly possible, but requires a significant volume of insight into the technical details of the chip, and the mathematics involved in calculating musical tones and note periods from raw frequency counter values. For this reason, it is common to use library modules that abstract these properties. The Intellivision Music Tracker Intellivision games designer and programmer Arnauld Chevallier, has implemented a tracker library to play specially-crafted music files on the Intellivision. He has been gracious enough to donate his code to the public domain so that all Intellivision programmers may benefit from it. Because it is freely available--and because it is so exceptionally useful and easy to integrate--it has become the de facto method to play music on Intellivision home-brew games. Using the tracker in your own games is a matter of including the library, defining some needed variable labels, and adding a call to update the tracker state periodically from your game loop. You also need to create your own music files in the appropriate data format. Tracker Data Format The format used in Arnauld's tracker has a lot in common with the classic MOD format of old Amiga tracker modules: a song defines a series of patterns, which describe musical sections, and specifies in which order they are to be played. More precisely, the data layout is closer to the later XM format introduced by Fast Tracker II, which added the notion of instruments. The most notable difference, of course, is that no digital samples are used at all. All instruments in the Intellivision tracker are software-generated tones. Below is the general structure of the tracker data layout, which I'll describe in detail further on. Root | +-- Pitch Effect #1 (...) +-- Pitch Effect #N | +-- Envelope #1 (...) +-- Envelope #N | +-- Drum #1 (...) +-- Drum #N | +-- Song #1 | | | +-- Header | +-- Pattern Sequence | +-- Pattern #1 | | | | | +-- Length of pattern | | +-- Sub-pattern for channel A | | +-- Sub-pattern for channel B | | +-- Sub-pattern for channel C (...)(...) | +-- Pattern #N | | | +-- Instrument #1 | | | | | +-- Pitch | | +-- Vibrato | | +-- Envelope (...)(...) | +-- Instrument #N | | | +-- Sub-pattern #1 | | | | | +-- Notes (...)(...) | +-- Sub-pattern #N | +-- Song #N Root Objects defined in this section are common to all songs. This may include pitch effects, envelopes and even drum patterns for a rudimentary percussion track implementation. Pitch Effects Some rather simple pitch effects are supported by the tracker, such as tremolo or fast arpeggios. The format is as follows: DECLE D[0], D[1], D[2], D[3] Where D[x] values are expressed in half-tones and are added to the current standard pitch of the note, on every frame, with the following formula: FinalPitch = StandardPitch + D[frame % 4] A frame is every game cycle where the tracker state is updated. Presumably, this would be 60 times a second, on standard NTSC Intellivision consoles. The result is that the tone is modulated, four frames at a time, by the number of half-tones defined for each frame, producing a tremolo effect. For example, pitch01: DECLE 0, 0, 0, 0 ; No modulation: |_|_|_|_| pitch02: DECLE 0, 0, 12, 12 ; half-modulation: |_|_|-|-| pitch03: DECLE 0, 12, 0, 12 ; fast-modulation: |_|-|_|-| The first pitch effect will play the note at its standard pitch without modulation. The second one will play the standard pitch for two frames, then increase the pitch by an octave (12 semi-tones) for another two frames, and repeat this throughout the length of the note. Finally, the third one will alternate the note between its standard pitch and one octave higher on every frame. Envelopes The tracker library does not use the hardware envelopes of the PSG. Instead, it relies on software envelopes defined in this section. The format of the envelope definition is as follows: DECLE SPEED DECLE WORD_00, ..., WORD_15 Where SPEED is in the range of [0..3] with 0 being the slowest and 3 the fastest. Each WORD_xx value is a hexadecimal value in the form $ABCD, where each nibble describes the volume level to be output. The tracker does not currently support loops within an envelope. Consequently, they are applied only once on each note. Consider an envelope as a 64 x 16 matrix, where each point defines the volume to be applied to an instrument on a given frame. Below is an example of a rather exaggerated envelope, in order to illustrate its layout: ATTACK DECAY SUSTAIN RELEASE .--------|---------------------|-------------------------------------------------------|---------------------------------------| F -|. . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E -|. . . . # # # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D -|. . . . # . . # # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C -|. . . . # . . . . # # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B -|. . . # . . . . . . . # # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V A -|. . . # . . . . . . . . . # # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O 9 -|. . . # . . . . . . . . . . . # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L 8 -|. . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U 7 -|. . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M 6 -|. . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E 5 -|. . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 -|. . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 -|. # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . # # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 -|. # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . # # # . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 -|# . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . # # # # # . . . . . . . 0 `+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+------ | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 1 3 7 B F E E D D C C B B A A 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 7 5 4 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ; Envelope definition DECLE 1 DECLE $137B, $FEED, $DCCB, $BAA9 DECLE $9999, $9999, $9999, $9999 DECLE $9999, $9999, $9999, $7543 DECLE $3222, $1111, $1000, $0000 The SPEED value influences how the tracker applies the envelope over time. For instance, a speed value of 0 will cycle through the matrix one point at a time. While a value of 1 will skip every other point, and so on. The envelope position for each frame is computed using the following formula: envelope_x = (frame / 2speed) Below is another, more common example. This one is for a simple envelope with a short attack, immediately followed by a linear decay in volume, all the way to zero. ATCK DECAY .----|---------------------------|---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- F -|. . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E -|. # . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D -|# . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C -|. . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B -|. . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V A -|. . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O 9 -|. . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L 8 -|. . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U 7 -|. . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M 6 -|. . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E 5 -|. . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 -|. . . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 -|. . . . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 -|. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 -|. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . # . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 `+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+------ | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | D E F E D C B A 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ; Envelope definition DECLE 2 DECLE $DEFE, $DCBA, $9876, $5432 DECLE $1000, $0000, $0000, $0000 DECLE $0000, $0000, $0000, $0000 DECLE $0000, $0000, $0000, $0000 Drums Drums are a special kind of instrument that are defined globally. A drum is a short and fixed sequence of tones with optional noise modulation. No pitch effects, vibrato, or envelopes are applied to drums. The drums section includes the patterns for each drum instrument, along with the instrument definitions themselves. A drum instrument pattern is a series of eight instrument definitions that describe the sound of the drum over time. This allows the shaping of the drum sound with varying measures of tones and noise, resulting in a richer sound. The library includes the macro Drum() that facilitates the definition of drum sounds. The macro is used as follows: Drum(TONE_PERIOD, NOISE_PERIOD, TONE, NOISE, VOLUME) ; #1 Drum(TONE_PERIOD, NOISE_PERIOD, TONE, NOISE, VOLUME) ; #2 ... Drum(TONE_PERIOD, NOISE_PERIOD, TONE, NOISE, VOLUME) ; #8 TONE_PERIOD: Corresponds to a 16-bit value describing the period of the tone to use. NOISE_PERIOD: Corresponds to a 16-bit value describing the period of the noise to apply. TONE: Declares whether to use the tone generator for this drum instrument: 1 = On 0 = Off NOISE: Declares whether to use the noise generator for this drum instrument: 1 = On 0 = Off VOLUME: Corresponds to a value in the range [0..15] describing the volume of this drum. Below is an example of a simple hi-hat cymbal instrument definition: @@hithat DRUM($380, $04, 0, 1, $D) DRUM($380, $04, 0, 1, $6) DRUM(0, 0, 0, 0, 0) DRUM(0, 0, 0, 0, 0) DRUM(0, 0, 0, 0, 0) DRUM(0, 0, 0, 0, 0) DRUM(0, 0, 0, 0, 0) DRUM(0, 0, 0, 0, 0) Song A song is a collection of patterns describing the notes and instruments to be played. The song definition includes a header, the sequence of patterns to play, and the pattern definitions. Header The song header describes the overall definition of the song, and takes the following format: DECLE SPEED, PATTERNS, INSTRUMENTS SPEED: The playing speed, expressed in frames. It actually represents the number of frames that each row in a pattern will last. PATTERNS: A pointer to the pattern definitions table. INSTRUMENTS: A pointer to the instrument definitions table to be used. Pattern Sequence The pattern sequence describes the order in which the patterns will be played. The sequence is comprised of the definition index of each pattern in the sequence. The pattern sequence is the actual musical sequence of the song, so only those patterns included in it will be played. The sequence may be terminated by a negative value identifying a looping point. The tracker will then backtrack that many patterns and repeat the sequence from that point. If the song is to terminate without looping, the magic constant $F000 may be use to tell the tracker to stop playing and clear its registers. Below is an example of a pattern sequence: DECLE 0, 1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2, 4, -4 The above will play the patterns listed in order, and loop indefinitely through the last four patterns. Replacing -4 with $F000 will instead cause the tracker to stop playing at the end of the song. Patterns A pattern is defined by its length, followed by pointers to sub-patterns for all three channels. The length of a pattern is expressed in rows, where a row represents a discrete musical event in time. (The speed of the song defined in the header corresponds to the number of frames between each pattern row.) It is important to think of patterns not in terms of beats and measures like a musical score, but as rows of tracker events that alter the output of a particular channel over time. The format of patterns is as follows: DECLE length, sub_pattern_a, sub_pattern_b, sub_pattern_c Where the length is the number of rows in the pattern, and sub_pattern_a, sub_pattern_b, and sub_pattern_c are pointers to sub-pattern definitions for channels A, B, and C, respectively. NOTE: The tracker assumes that all patterns have the same length. You are advised to ensure this is the case, or else Bad Things may happen during execution. Instruments This section holds all song instrument definitions. Each instrument includes information about pitch effects, optional amplitude modulation (vibrato), and an envelope. The instrument definition takes on the following format: DECLE PITCH, VIBRATO, ENVELOPE PITCH: A pointer to a pitch effect object previously defined in the global header. VIBRATO: The amount of vibrato effect to apply, in the range of [0..3]: 0 = no vibrato 1 = low 2 = medium 3 = high ENVELOPE: A pointer to an envelope object previously defined in the global header. Up to 15 different instruments can be defined. Sub-Patterns A sub-pattern indicates the actual notes to be played in a pattern, the instrument to be used for each note, and its volume. A note in this context describes a discrete tracker event which alters the output produced by a channel over a series of rows. The tracker library includes the macro NOTE() to define notes. For standard instruments (i.e., not drums), the macro takes as argument a string in the form: NOTE("NnO IVL") N = Musical note (from A to G) n = # for sharp; - for regular O = Octave (from 1 to 7) I = Instrument (from 1 to F, with '0' meaning no change) V = Volume (from 0 to F) L = Length, in rows (from 0 to F) The length is the number of rows to wait before the next event, and corresponds to the length of the note minus 1. For instance, a length of 7 corresponds to a note lasting for eight rows: the tracker will apply the note event on the current row, and wait for seven more until the next event. For drum instruments, the "NnO" parameter is replaced by the "DRM" keyword: NOTE("DRM IVL") I = Drum instrument (from 1 to F) V = Volume (from 0 to F) L = Length, in rows (from 0 to F) The library also includes the macro NOTES(), which defines four notes at a time. Any unused arguments can be padded with empty strings. For example: @@p003 NOTES("A-5 3F7", "G-5 3F7", "E-5 3F7", "F-5 3F1") NOTES("E-5 3F5", "", "", "") The "NnO" parameter may also be replaced by the "NUL" keyword, which means that no note change has occurred for this event. This makes it possible to define notes with a length greater than 15. EDIT: Corrected typos and edited for clarity.
  5. Testing "LSDJ" music tracker at the GameBoy Color (GBC) core at Analogue Nt Mini.
  6. Hey all. I would like to write a tune or 2, and have no idea how to "really" start. I found this link: http://knox.ac.free.fr/index.php/pc/aytracker but the software does not appear to be available. I found a link to OpenMPT, but I could not find a way to get anything created there into something I can actually compile into a .rom and run in jvIntv. I also do not understand how to take the code from the sound examples on the wiki and join them with the "hello world" program I successfully built last night for the first time. All ideas appreciated. Thanks!
  7. FreeTalent

    Music Tracker

    From the album: Atari 2600 - Tools

    I'm used to tools like FastTracker or ModPlug Tracker , so I developed my own tracker in the same philosophy and exporting code to Batari.

    © Baptiste Bideaux.

  8. Hi all, i have just finish a new beta of my Ym2149 Sound emulations / ym player / tracker for windows, You Can download here. http://www.fedepede04.dk/Ym2149.html or here http://www.bitmania....home_fedepede04
  9. While we're all (rightfully!) awaiting the easter release of Kylearan's TIATracker I'd like to share a small application I wrote. While TIATracker is a much more mature product, this application might be of interest to those who have experience dealing with Slocum's Music Kit/Sequencer Kit (I've noticed the naming hasn't been very consistent). Slocum Tracker is a web based interface for the aforementioned Sequencer Kit. Even though Slocum's documentation is of a high standard and the text based writing of songs a simple enough solution, the workflow is quite spartan. At least in the sense that if your goal is to quickly compose music, the writing of binary codes and the declaring of pattern lists at multiple levels can be cumbersome. Slocum Tracker looks and behaves like many trackers do, offering the possibility to store and revisit your projects, provides hotkeys for quick sculpting of patterns as well as a state history and lists all features of Slocum's Sequencer Kit in easily accessible pulldown menus. Once you're satisfied with your work and want to listen to your patterns, you hit the "export" button to generate the required code for use with Sequencer Kit. You can then assemble the Atari program like before. The tracker is geared towards composers who aren't comfortable enough with writing for Sequencer Kit directly. Homebrew developers can now call in the help of musical friends to deliver a soundtrack while they can rely on the tried and tested performance of Sequencer Kit to ensure that their game / demo is making optimal use of the Atari's available resources. A short video demonstration : You can run Slocum Tracker directly using any modern web browser by navigating here. Would be interested in seeing if it can be of any help to you guys as I basically wrote it to speed up proceedings when enjoying some downright edgy TIA tones
  10. Since I've been experimenting with RMT (and loving it), it's time to peel away the onion and get deeper into the tracking / chiptune thing. I've always been a "sound" guy - I play music, own synths, etc and often thought POKEY could be flexed more than it was (and we see this is now true). Just downloaded MPT, which I believe allows native A8 track development. I also wanted to play around with NeoTracker, but I can't seem to find it. Does NeoTracker run natively on the A8 / XL / XE platforms? Would like to give it a try - any help is appreciated!
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