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Found 14 results

  1. You want to use your F18A enhanced computer, vintage game machine or other VGA equipped classic computer on your fancy new big screen television set? Think again, most new affordable TV’s no longer support VGA or S-Video inputs. Don’t you just love planned obsolescence and cost saving methods? What’s a hobbyist to do? There are many different VGA to HDMI converters available for sale. The Sewell Hammerhead is on the upper end of the price scale, but there are other more reasonably priced devices that will not ‘break the bank’ and still do the job quite well. Items that you will need 1) VGA to HDMI converter (comes with power cable) 2) HDMI video cable 3) Optional power supply if you don’t use the USB power on the TV. There are numerous lower priced knock-off units out there, some in the $6.00 -$11.00 range. I cannot guarantee results with any of those as I do not have any first-hand experience with them. One, like I purchased is listed in <<THIS LINK>>. This unit sells in the $23.00 range and is confirmed to work quite well with the F18A in my TI-99/4A. Thanks to Atari Age user JediMatt42 for bringing this specific unit to my attention. If you do not already have an extra HDMI cable, you’ll probably want to purchase one at the same time. Be aware that if your VGA output is only 640 X 480, like with the F18A, you’ll have to adjust the setting on your TV to display it at the full or proper size. This thing is a snap to install, however the audio output on many different devices varies, so no matter what converter you end up purchasing, you may have to purchase or make your own converter for the audio plug. INPUT WANTED If you end up purchasing a device in the under $10.00 price range, I'd like to read your comments and a review. Thanks.
  2. The F18A Video Enhancement Board Retro Computing on the TI-99/4A can be a blast from the past for many of us, but nothing can ruin the experience faster than blurry, distorted or snowy images. Were we really going to dump hundreds of dollars into re-acquiring old equipment, as well as the cool new toys coming out, only to view a crappy picture over some lousy old TV or monitor? Heck NO, and we didn't have to, because as many of us in the community learned, before it was discontinued, Matthew Haggarty came to our rescue with the truly affordable F18A Video Enhancement board. UPDATE --- 02/02/2019 --- At one point, among Atari Age users, the F18A was the most used video output device for the TI-99/4A. After being discontinued, the 9918 has regained that spot as more new users have entered the TI community. Of course, the F18A MK2 will probably change that again after it's release. There were so many reasons to get one of these video upgrades, some of the most obvious were: 1) Crisp and sharp video 2) Ability to use modern HDTV's and computer monitors 3) Ease of installation 4) Reasonably priced However, there were more not so obvious reasons as well: With age, numerous TI systems developed different video issues, the F18A card fixed all of these problems without the owners having to waste literally hours, days or weeks trying to diagnose and identify the specific video chip at fault. They also avoided the hassles of removing the old broken components. Since this is a socketed device, it was a fix even a newbie with no soldering skills could perform. It was only advertised as a functional 9918 replacement, but quite frankly, it had a few tricks up it's sleeve that went above and beyond a crisp, clean, and flicker free picture. This board had HUGE additional benefits that many people, myself included enjoy... ...80 COLUMN MODE... Yep! The F18A displays 80 columns in programs like the Multiplan, BOOT, 4A/DOS, Force Command and the Tursi modified BA-Writer and many more. With the sheer number of F18A's out in the wild, it had become the de-facto standard. I'm hoping more stuff becomes available for it's replacement in the coming years. Here are a few screenshots taken from my system.... The attached PDF file below contains all the known programs to currently take advantage of the F18A's 80 column mode or enhanced graphics capabilities. (As of 1 January, 2015) You can download a few of the major 80 column compatible programs << HERE >> This was the #1 upgrade for the TI-99/4A. Everyone gained from this device, from the lowly newbie or returning user with only the basic console, to the rabid TI zealot with a totally over-blown and radically expanded system. As we wait patiently for the F18A MK2, Another Atari Age user, Vectrex Roli made a neat little You Tube video about this card, take a peek here... *** UPDATE -- 09/21/2016 If you want to use this device on a modern flat screen TV that only has an HDMI connector << CLICK HERE >> for more information about VGA to HDMI converters. TI-F18-Extra.pdf
  3. gulps

    ntmini To scart2

    Analogue Nt Mini cable for SCART-Euroconector use.
  4. gulps

    Vga onboard

    Classic motherboard connections.
  5. Projects - VGA to SCART Converter - [2] http://www.nexusuk.org/projects/vga2scart/voltage_from_vsync/view
  6. Hi, I used to collect Atari computers and PCs of similar age and I've been getting rid of most of my old collection since I've fallen out of the hobby. I really like the way the SM124 monitor I have looks though and was wondering if there was any way to connect a vga or other sort of slightly more updated video connection to it. I've found adapters online but they all seem to be so that you can use a VGA monitor with an Atari ST, I'm searching for the opposite of that basically. Any information about adapters, mods, or why what I'm asking isn't feasible or practical would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  7. gulps

    Vga screws

    Analogue Nt Mini with vga screws added.
  8. The Atari Lynx 1-UP from: starforcepi.wordpress.com What’s the greatest handheld of the 1980s and 1990s? Why, the 16-bit arcade juggernaut named Atari Lynx, of course! I was a kid when the original Lynx 1 came out for us here in the old country in 1990, and was blown away. The Game Boy was a monochrome moron in comparison, and the Game Gear was all about converting Mega Drive and Master System games to pocket version – the Lynx, with its hardware-driven zooming and distortion of sprites, was going for Arcade experiences. BOOYA! Sadly, as with everthing Atari, this too turned to dust. BUT, fast-forward to 2018 and look at the love for this loveable giant! So much so, that McWill, a name you must’ve heard of by now, released one of the most impressive upgrades for a system I’ve ever seen – LCD replacement for the waning washed-out Lynx screen, with VGA output. The VGA output was a great addition, but the way I’ve seen people utilize it online seemed rather silly to me; you would have to use the Lynx as the controller when playing on the VGA. No sir, I don’t like it. So I decided to use the spacious room behind the screen to build an interface to: 1) securely place the Lynx on a stand; 2) output VGA; 3) connect a standard DB9 compatible controller (Mega Drive, Master System, Atari). It’s a tight squeeze, but the VGA, Controller port and Stand all fit neatly in the small 3x4cm interface window. This was an absolute pleasure to build, everything went smooth and simple, all the measurements were direct hits, hell even the stand only took me 10 minutes to design (8 hours to print, but hey). So let’s see it in full VGA action: It’s perhaps the best handheld to consolize: the GameGear has most games on Master System or Mega Drive, the GameBoy looks rather silly and clunky on a monitor, and TurboExpress is pointless, because it’s a 1-to-1 conversion of the actual console. I am glad I did it, I hope you will too, and stop placing those ugly connectors on the top of your handheld. Building the Lynx 1-UPI bought a pristine looking junked Lynx 1 for 20 euros – seemed a good place to start, let’s see if we can bring it alive! I replaced all the capacitors, power input socket, MOSFET, but finally it was the two 3906 transistors that were the issue. In order to do these replacements, you need a fine-point soldering iron and some tweezers, but everything on the board is quite spacious, so there’s no mistaking what’s what. This part is cheap: 7 dollars on console5.com. They have links and tutorials on that site, very complete. I also bought the McWill for 120 dollars, I was gonna do this mod regardless if this particular system was junked. So far everything together cost me ~150 dollars. After bringing the console back to live, it was time for McWillification! I followed the 1 page diagram that came with it, but it’s a little information dense, so I followed the following video instead: This worked better than I could have ever imagined, I know everyone says they’re gobsmacked when they see the difference, but it really is very true – I get why it’s such an expensive mod now. I was gonna leave it with that, honestly that’s just everything one could ever want from an upgrade… but, of course, me being the way I am, things escalated. You see, the mod came with the VGA socket, and I saw how people were placing these at the top of their handhelds, and you know what – it looked ugly. I want the facade of the handheld to be untouched. While I was adding the McWill mod I noticed the enormous space left behind the screen, which is when I had the idea: make the Lynx into a hybrid, with the connector ports at the back with a stand for console gaming via VGA, and all the ports hidden behing a minimal cover during handheld gaming. I first ordered DB9 sockets for a controller, and placed this together with the VGA socket on the inside of the battery cover. I made a little window in the battery cover, 3D printed a frame and cover for the ports, and there we have our interface. For the controller ports I had to solder 6 wires on the button pads of the Lynx PCB. Luckily most of these have soldered extension traces, so you can avoid blocking the normal button-to-pad press, but for two I had to solder directly onto the pad: be mindfull to be as flat as possible. Then we wire up the VGA socket to the pads on the McWill screen, this is shown in the accompanied diagram of the screen. We then place the DB9 and VGA socket in the space between the batteries, where the little light tube of the old screen sat (ignore the loose wires, they’re from the battery input, I cut them for ease of access). In the left picture, top connector is the VGA socket you can see running to the McWill screen. The lower connector go to the front of the PCB to the button pads. When assembled the VGA socket is lower, and DB9 is upper. Next to these I added screw connectors, so that I may fix the system to a stand, as shown in the next pictures: Unlike the Nintendo Snack Pack, this was a joy to make. I did it to unwind and relax, I didn’t want to build something from the ground up, but this just gave enough inspiration to just slightly 1-up it. The Lynx Stand and little VGA cover in particular really clean the mod up nicely, and makes this thing into a fully consolized system. I must admit though, I’ve been mostly playing it with the stand and controller via the McWill screen, not via VGA, but hey, it’s there. Finally, it all cost me a substantial 150 euro, but it was worth it. The Atari Lynx is a very strange and powerful handheld, spanning 7 years with 72 games, it’s still enjoying new homebrew releases every year, with a small but dedicated following. I’m very happy to be one of them. Upgrades: Full capacitor replacement MOSFET replacement 3906 Transistor replacement Power input socket replacement McWill Screen upgrade VGA output port DB9 input port Custom interface window & stand
  9. gulps

    vga2euro

    This cable lets you connect a TV set with a RGB capable scart input to the PC VGA output. It is necessary to set the PC video card to output a 15.6kHz 50/60 Hz signal so that line and frame refresh frequencies are TV/Arcade monitor compatible as explained in the Introduction.

    © http://www.geocities.ws/podernixie/htpc/cables-en.html

  10. Hello all..... Have done some reading up on why older systems look rubbish on new monitors, like the photo I've attached of my Coco 3 hooked up to my old Bravia. That pic isnt too bad but text is horrible especially in 80 column mode. Been reading up on the VGA adaptor made by Roy Justus and it looks like a great piece of equipment. He was good enough to reply to my email letting me know he's not making them at the moment but will in future (This was last month). When he decides to build them again, I'm still going to buy one but is there something else I can use in the meantime? (Didn't realise how much I missed that old machine....emulators are great but much prefer the real thing!) Thanks.
  11. Alright, so I got this really awesome 3D LED tv (Vizio Razor M3D460SR) but since it's so thin or something they combined the AV input with the Component1 plugs (green is shared with the yellow composite plug) and Component2 with the VGA input (works with a VGA to component passthrough cable and an RCA to 3.5mm stereo cable). Is there anyone with really awesome video ciruitry skills that can help devise a custom external device to combat this? Wishful thinking: A) S-Video to Component circuit - Doesn't need to upscale past 480i, but I'd like to keep the quality improvement from the S-Video connector instead of going S-Video -> RCA Composite A-2) Composite to Component if A) is possible (for 3) below) B) Some form of automatic switching between sources Realistic goals / options 1) Input 1: Component + RCA Left/Right, Input 2: VGA Computer + 3.5mm Stereo, Output: VGA connector + 3.5mm Stereo In other words, make a switch for a VGA -> Component passthrough and a normal VGA source. There's no conversion from Component to an actual VGA signal, the tv supports and has been tested with a Component to VGA cable. 2) Input: Component (Green, Blue, and Red plugs), Composite (Yellow), Output: Green, Blue, White Explanation: A switch that cuts off Red and Blue when set to Composite, Yellow gets forwarded to Green. I've got an automatic switchbox that only outputs one set of RCA audio cables for both component and composite, so that's why that's not included. 3) Assuming A): Input 1: S-Video + RCA Left/Right, Input 2: Composite + RCA Left/Right, Input 3: Component + RCA Left/Right, Input 4: VGA + 3.5mm Stereo, Output: VGA connector + 3.5mm Stereo On Input 2: Left mono to Stereo when Right In connector has no signal VGA passthrough switch as in 1) Assuming B) as well: If there is a signal on Input 4, leave it on 4 unless manually switched. If there is no signal, switch to VGA -> Component passthrough For inputs 1, 2, and 3 switch to the input that has received a signal last. ie: Input 1 is on, input 3 is turned on switch to input 3, input 2 is turned on switch to input 2. (same function as the switch box I have now)
  12. I'm looking to buy a Saturn SVIDEO cable, a Dreamcast SVIDEO cable, and a Dreamcast VGA cable. I'm not too picky; I'll take a Pelican or Performance brand; anything. If the cable sucks, I'll rip it apart and make my own from the console-side connector. Other things I may be interested in if you have them: SVIDEO/Composite to VGA converter Composite cable for Genesis/Megadrive I Composite cable for Genesis/Megadrive II
  13. gulps

    ntmini To scart1

    Analogue Nt Mini cable for SCART-Euroconector use.
  14. Hey guys, I know that this poor horse has been beaten to death on the forums but i need some advice. I have an Atari 1040STe with 4mb memory upgrade. I have a spare LG 27" TV thats sits nicely next to my iMac. My plan is to use the TV for both low/medium and high res via din->scart and din->VGA for the Atari, as well as a secondary monitor for my iMac via HDMI. The problem is the quality of the picture of the Atari. When i view it via the Din->Scart cable in low or medium resolution the screen seems to jump every few seconds, apart from this the picture is good, however, this screen jumping makes playing games impossible When i view the atari in hi res via din->VGA, i get very slight constant flickering. When i plug the Atari into my cheap VGA monitor i don't get anywhere near as much flickering. Not sure if this may be a cause of the problem but, I should mention both the din->vga and din->scart cables have stereo audio breakouts as the rca audio out ports on the machine seem to be playing up (seems the output is way too hot and the volume doesn't match L + R, but i'm going to look into this once I've sorted the screen thing.) So to summarise; plug in via scart i get occasional screen jumping, and plug in via vga i get slight flickering. What do you guys reckon? Thanks so much!
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