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UNIXcoffee928

Datasoft INTER-LISP/65

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Someone, just buy it from him.

 

Given that there's half a dozen people in this thread in 4 and a half years, I'd estimate the value of the book at about 3 dollars.

 

i'll see your $3, and raise 2...

 

sloopy.

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2UNIXcoffee928

Thank you for instructions.

 

About ATOMIC ERROR ... :cool:

It's about accidental nuclear attack.

This is footprints of Cold War of course ... :)

 

May be someone find this useful: LISP books

It's little collection of famous LISP books.

 

I'v tried investigating 80-cols mode in VBXE and AustinFranklin 80 emulation, but still unsuccessfully. So pity. These sweet color letters...

Thank you very much for those books!

 

The one in Cyrillic is gonna take a while, though, lol. I know a tiny subset of spoken Russian, from having once dated a Madwoman from Leningrad, but not enough to get me through a full technical manual, though, ha. Her mother was freakin' crazy, too. They were both very beautiful, and were good cooks. lol. I still miss her "Winter Salad", Kompot, and their Borscht recipe... stomach grumbles.... Interestingly, even though I am hungry, I can't say that I miss their meals enough to ever talk to them again, though, ha. Very crafty womenfolk. Amusingly, they both pronounced the current city name as "Saint Pete-uuuurs-Borg", haha. I'm gonna have to look up multiple recipes, on the web, and get experimental in the kitchen, to Zen-out the way they made that stuff.

 

Re: ATOMIC ERROR- haha, yes, I'm very interested in studying Cold War History, particularly with regard to Technology History from that time-period, and how how computing technology has evolved to it's current stage.

 

Has any info been made available about the Soviet AI Labs?

 

It would be interesting to study the divergent paths that Soviet AI researchers took, while pursing AI, outside of the direct influence of the American & British efforts... because so much information was not shared during the Cold War; it is very much like many hundreds of thousands of man-hours of programming and systems development are still virtually unknown to the scientific community, because of the culture of secrecy that was fostered, back then.

 

Do you know of any links, or prominent names of Soviet AI labs or AI researchers? Considering the amount of groundbreaking work that the US & UK accomplished during that time, I'm sure that Russia must have also had many breakthroughs, that were never published, due to the restrictions that were in place.

 

Thanks, again, for the books!

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Hello UNIXcoffee928,

 

Oops!

I'm sorry for sending Cyrillic translation of finnish "E. Hyvönen, and J. Seppänen: Lisp world" book.

 

As far as it's concearned Russian women which are abroad they are all crazy to the end!!!

The only reason they went to trip is to find a place suitable enough for buying silver dollar for a cent.

They may be foolish or clever no mean ... they are absolutely extraterrestrials with their absurd way of thinking and life. ;)

So ...

I was looking for a natural "wife of mine" for about 43 years and found her at last. Oh Boy!

God knows how I am pity about the time wasted ... By the way, she also cooks perfectly. ;)

 

If we'll speak about AI etc. I must say at first that I'm newer dealt with LISP, PROLOG, AI and so on.

But I may say that Soviet AI researches certainly existed there.

You know of course that a lot of Scientists and Engineers from USSR have dumped abroad in 80th.

You can find the footprints of their efforts in huge improvements having place in recent years in working of Internet searching engines, Automatic translators, OCR's. (Please, recall russian owners of Google, some social networks etc. Cold war, Big brother, Enemy of the State... AI is natural honey for military and spy technologies.)

But I guess that core portion of achievements is under the carpet till nowadays.

Not necessarily the Soviet, of course. ;)

 

I heared smth. about russian Fontain technology in OCR area.

 

I'm not a programmer at all but recently I wrote some useful utilities and math functions. It works!

 

D:EDIT.LSP add-on

; (PP* (GETD 'FUNC)) - pretty-prints to printer

(DEFINEQ PP*

(LAMBDA (S-EXP)

(PROGN (OPEN 4 8 (QUOTE P:))

(PR# 4)

(PP)

(PR# 0)

(CLOSE 4)))

)

; (PPR FUNC) - pretty-prints to printer

; calls PP* - sintax sugar only

(DEFINEQ

(MACRO (F)

(CONS (QUOTE PP*) (LIST (LIST (QUOTE GETD) (LIST (QUOTE QUOTE) (CADR F))))))

)

 

D:INIT.LSP add-on

; (ED) - loads and runs structured editor

(DEFINEQ ED

(LAMBDA NIL

(PROGN (LOAD (QUOTE D:EDIT.LSP))

(EDIT)))

)

; (NULL L) - empty list test

(DEFINEQ NULL

(LAMBDA (L)

(EQ L NIL))

)

; (IF (COND-EXPR) (THEN-EXPR) (ELSE-EXPR))

(DEFINEQ IF

(LAMBDA (CO TH EL)

(COND (CO TH)

(T EL)))

)

; (DEMAC M-NAME (ARG ...) (BODY)) - defines MACRO

(DEFINEQ DEMAC

(MACRO (L)

(CONS (QUOTE DEFINEQ)

(LIST (CADR L) (CONS (QUOTE MACRO) (CDDR L)))))

)

; (SUM-AUX '(1 3 5 7 ...))

; 1-level num-list SUMMA - expext list!

(DEFINEQ SUM-AUX

(LAMBDA (L)

(COND ((NULL L) 0)

(T (+ (CAR L) (SUM-AUX (CDR L))))))

)

; (SUM 1 3 5 7 ...)

; calls SUM-AUX - sintax sugar only

(DEFINEQ SUM

(MACRO (L)

(LIST (QUOTE SUM-AUX) (LIST (QUOTE QUOTE) (CDR L))))

)

; (SUM '(10 (1 2 (3 4) 5 (6 7) 8) 9 ...))

; multilevel lists SUMMA - expects lists

(DEFINEQ SUM*

(LAMBDA (L)

(COND ((NULL L) 0)

((ATOM L) L)

(T (+ (SUM* (CAR L)) (SUM* (CDR L))))))

)

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...

As far as it's concerned Russian women which are abroad they are all crazy to the end!!!

The only reason they went to trip is to find a place suitable enough for buying silver dollar for a cent.

They may be foolish or clever no mean ... they are absolutely extraterrestrials with their absurd way of thinking and life. ;)

....

 

Ha ha, well put! That advice could have saved me a few years of mind-stretching bewilderment, had I only heard it sooner.

 

= )

 

 

 

...

So ... I was looking for a natural "wife of mine" for about 43 years and found her at last. Oh Boy!

God knows how I am pity about the time wasted ... By the way, she also cooks perfectly. ;)

...

 

 

Congratulations, dude!I hope that one day I'll meet & marry a woman who is consistent & "Natural". Thus far, I have established a very good, long-standing track-record of dating Consistently Inconsistent & Naturally Unnatural womenfolk. ha. I guess that I could further qualify that by saying that they were Predictably Unpredictable, but I think that that's intrinsically part of their whole allure, ha. Women, sheesh! ha.

 

 

 

...

 

If we'll speak about AI etc. I must say at first that I'm newer dealt with LISP, PROLOG, AI and so on.

But I may say that Soviet AI researches certainly existed there.

You know of course that a lot of Scientists and Engineers from USSR have dumped abroad in 80th.

You can find the footprints of their efforts in huge improvements having place in recent years in working of Internet searching engines, Automatic translators, OCR's. (Please, recall russian owners of Google, some social networks etc. Cold war, Big brother, Enemy of the State... AI is natural honey for military and spy technologies.)

But I guess that core portion of achievements is under the carpet till nowadays.

Not necessarily the Soviet, of course.

 

 

I pretty much was under the impression that the fruits of the labors of the Soviet AI researchers was to forever be kept from scrutiny, locked away in the firmware of jets & missile systems rusting away in vast scrapheaps... until I ran across "DRAKON", today.

 

 

It seems that more information was recently made available about the "Buran program", which I had heard of, and was familiar with, but didn't know too much about it's operational details. I was under the impression that it had essentially been a mock-up & prototype that was never actually flown... so I was very surprised to read that it had flown once, but more impressively, that it had no pilots, and flew by computer control.

 

As it turns out, the language known as DRAKON was developed by the Soviet AI community, to streamline the process of software & systems development. It also appears that the language was also used to optimize the development of the aerospace vehicle, itself. Fascinating stuff. The manual for DRAKON shows it as a Visual Language that utilizes the familiar "Flowchart Metaphor", which is very cool. Upon reflection, it seems obvious that there should have been a language like this, very early on, since we all learn flowcharting, in school.

 

There is

that shows that Atari was working on this type of programming language, around the time that Alan Kay was running the Atari R&D. Many people are unaware that there is a "lineage of thought" that stretches from the people who left SRI's ARC, then went to XEROX PARC, then went to Atari R&D. Apparently, other DOD funded brain-trust research made it's way to Atari Cambridge R&D, where none other than Margaret Minsky, herself, demonstrates some interesting concepts that are different than, but also somewhat similar & complimentary to the design metaphor which DRAKON utilizes. Of course, this makes me wonder, "How cool would it be if a version of DRAKON was made that used the touch-screen features that Atari was working on?". Answer: It would be ultracool!

 

Ironically, I wasn't even looking for an example of Soviet AI... I kinda figured that I'd get around to that next month, ha... amusingly, I started out by trying to optimize some shielding on a system that I'm building, came upon three NASA manuals that covered EVERYTHING that there is to know about proper shielding, followed links to several fighter planes, and spacecraft, and then ended up stumbling upon DRAKON about thirty links from where i started... ha. This is PRECISELY how I get distracted, lol. &, of course, there is still a big box setting in the basement that needs to be properly shielded. ha.

 

I must say, however, that if you have a project, you really can't go wrong by looking to see how NASA solved the problems that you are looking at, after all, they have some of the best minds on the planet writing up their manuals. I have a fairly complicated music studio set up here, and I run everything as I would run a Datacenter (I'm a Sys Admin, by former profession). I use my tech knowledge to optimize my environment, and I then augment that with the Conventional Wisdom of producers & engineers with backgrounds in designing professional recording facilities. ...THEN, I check to see how NASA does it. In many cases, I have learned more by reading NASA manuals then by reading so called "Professional" recording studio literature.

 

Here's a good link for NASA manuals.

 

 

Personally, I think that DRAKON is a really great concept, & I have a strong feeling that I'll be experimenting with it, in the future. For now, though I have to get back to the La-bor-a-tory, muhaha.

 

EDIT: Ah ha! a quick search for: Radia Perlman mit button box (as evidenced in the Cambridge Atari Research video) yields this link to a paper on the basis behind the touch-screen programming shown in the Atari video!

Edited by UNIXcoffee928

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As far as unique concepts in visual programming go, I had neglected to mention the contemporary programming environment known as "Scratch", which can be downloaded here.

 

A page with a lot of good vintage AI video segments, that is maintained by Cynthia Solomon (from the Atari Cambridge Research video) is here. It has a lot of great footage of the original Turtle-Robots, which could be put to good use as clear examples of how to build one that is historically accurate.

 

I think that, once I can gather enough info, I'll start a new thread on Atari R&D, since I'm pretty sure that few people visit this LISP thread.

 

Oh, and by the way, I remembered the name of one of the Russian foods that I liked, today, which I couldn't think of, before... Perhaps you can tell me the correct spelling, so that I may look up a recipe... It was pronounced: "Pole-meh-knee". Thanks!

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Thanks for the LOGO links. There's a ton of interesting stuff there. I have an interest in how kids relate to computers beyond games and spreadsheets so watching some of the stuff from Papert is really interesting.

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2UNIXcoffee928

 

Hi, friend,

 

Speaking about Buran I can say that my Aunt and Uncle worked on it.

Strictly on launch vehicle 'Energy' - 100 tonns of freight, H2-O2 fuel ...

I mean - the same vehicle as planning today for MARS project of NASA. ;)

It was a real launch vehicle turning Buran to the orbit.

If you really interested in high technology I'll give you this link to a film about this.

http://tvroscosmos.ru/?page=general

 

It's in russian, of course, but there are many documental filming that can show you something about MAIN project.

Not Buran at all!

It Was long terms project - Spiral and then MAKS...

 

The beginning was in 60-th, the end ... is obviously due to dressed to kill Mr. Gorbachev.

 

They say that Spiral was working (with people onboard) model (1/2 of natural size) of orbit fighter-bomber.

Perfectly controlled in athmosphere or in cosmos, no mean.

It was MUCH and MUCH more aerodynamically perfect than Buran and Shuttle both.

It was launched 6 times for about of 400km orbit. It has life-saving capsule. ;)

 

The MAKS was the same but more powerful for hidden launching from MRIA - heavy transport aeroplane - up to 320 tonns luggage.

They both (MAKS and Spiral) was designed for dog-fight in athmosphere or in cosmos no mean.

 

By the way, Buran was only a cover story for Spiral and MAKS.

 

Speaking about Buran I only can say that it was only heavy orbit fighter.

Shuttle can not being controlled in space but Buran can.

It has 16 tonn force march engines and fuel enough for it work.

 

Two words about AI.

When Buran have approached to landing strip it DECIDED itself that summaru of wind velocity and its own landing velocity is too much and after checking of fuel amount it decided to go on second turn and then landed successfully.

Nevertheless the film is too long for interpreting.

...

 

I'm learning Inter-LISP/65 now, so a little bit of code:

 

; (RIN X)
; Expecting highest number of range.
; Returns Random Integer Number of X.
(DEFINEQ RIN
 (LAMBDA (N L)
   (SETQ L (LIST (INT (* N (/ (+ (PEEK 53770) (* 256 (PEEK 53770))) 65536))))))
)
; RIN List Expects Number
; Returns list of integers
(DEFINEQ RINLIS
 (LAMBDA (N)
   (PROG (I L)
	  (SETQ I N)
	  LOOP
	  (COND ((EQ I 0)
			 (RETURN L))
		    (T (SETQ L (APPEND (RIN N) L))))
	  (SETQ I (SUB I 1))
	  (GO LOOP)))
)

 

And ... PillMenny, but last L sounds like Willie - very soft. Menny is like Merry of course :)

 

Best wishes from far far from anywhere!

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2UNIXcoffee928

 

Hi, friend,

 

Speaking about Buran I can say that my Aunt and Uncle worked on it.

Strictly on launch vehicle 'Energy' - 100 tonns of freight, H2-O2 fuel ...

I mean - the same vehicle as planning today for MARS project of NASA. ;)

It was a real launch vehicle turning Buran to the orbit.

If you really interested in high technology I'll give you this link to a film about this.

http://tvroscosmos.ru/?page=general

 

It's in russian, of course, but there are many documental filming that can show you something about MAIN project.

Not Buran at all!

It Was long terms project - Spiral and then MAKS...

 

The beginning was in 60-th, the end ... is obviously due to dressed to kill Mr. Gorbachev.

 

They say that Spiral was working (with people onboard) model (1/2 of natural size) of orbit fighter-bomber.

Perfectly controlled in athmosphere or in cosmos, no mean.

It was MUCH and MUCH more aerodynamically perfect than Buran and Shuttle both.

It was launched 6 times for about of 400km orbit. It has life-saving capsule. ;)

 

The MAKS was the same but more powerful for hidden launching from MRIA - heavy transport aeroplane - up to 320 tonns luggage.

They both (MAKS and Spiral) was designed for dog-fight in athmosphere or in cosmos no mean.

 

By the way, Buran was only a cover story for Spiral and MAKS.

 

Speaking about Buran I only can say that it was only heavy orbit fighter.

Shuttle can not being controlled in space but Buran can.

It has 16 tonn force march engines and fuel enough for it work.

 

Two words about AI.

When Buran have approached to landing strip it DECIDED itself that summaru of wind velocity and its own landing velocity is too much and after checking of fuel amount it decided to go on second turn and then landed successfully.

Nevertheless the film is too long for interpreting.

...

 

I'm learning Inter-LISP/65 now, so a little bit of code:

 

; (RIN X)
; Expecting highest number of range.
; Returns Random Integer Number of X.
(DEFINEQ RIN
 (LAMBDA (N L)
(SETQ L (LIST (INT (* N (/ (+ (PEEK 53770) (* 256 (PEEK 53770))) 65536))))))
)
; RIN List Expects Number
; Returns list of integers
(DEFINEQ RINLIS
 (LAMBDA (N)
(PROG (I L)
	  (SETQ I N)
	  LOOP
	  (COND ((EQ I 0)
			 (RETURN L))
			(T (SETQ L (APPEND (RIN N) L))))
	  (SETQ I (SUB I 1))
	  (GO LOOP)))
)

 

And ... PillMenny, but last L sounds like Willie - very soft. Menny is like Merry of course :)

 

Best wishes from far far from anywhere!

 

Wow, that will be a lot of fun stuff to look up! I had read that it was primarily a military spacecraft with the veiled guise of a research-oriented shuttle clone. Ha, ha, now THAT would have pushed the state of technology, had it found widespread use in the Soviet arsenal! We would still have jobs here, lol.

 

Being that you are about ten years older than me, you lived more of your grown-up life during those times, and just by your choice of wording, it reminds me of the times when everything was so much more secretive. My father was a submariner during the mid-point of the cold war, before I was born, so I was brought up & educated at home in a similar fashion, but from our side of the fence, so to speak, ha. Between 6-12 years old I was a young expert on military strategy & technology, and a copy of "Jane's Fighting Ships" was never too far from my sketchpad, or the models that I would put together & paint. I was also one of those kids that had a bedroom with model WWI biplanes, WWII prop-driven planes, Jet Fighters, and Estes model rockets hanging from my ceiling with fishing line, and had model tanks on the shelves. I knew what was up, as a kid.

 

There have been three times in my life that I've sat down to read "One Day in the life of Ivan Denisovich"... and I always end up stopping reading it about half way through, because it's such an ongoing onslaught of misery... when you talk about being in the middle of nowhere, I sure hope that doesn't mean Siberia, lol... If you do, I hope that you pack up the family & get on the first train outta there, ha!

 

You seem like a great guy & I'm sure that we would be good friends. Ironic, due to the environment that we grew up in. I am happy that our countries are at peace with one another, again. War is such a counterproductive thing for Humanity. Then again, war is like seeing a car crash, or a train-wreck in slow motion... there is a certain fatalism to it that can hold your undivided attention, however unwillingly.

 

With that said, while the superpowers were clashing, there was no room, or time to worry about random terroristic threats... back then, terrorism was a minuscule, mosquito-like annoyance, in comparison to thinking about the potential effects of MIRV-based ICBM warfare. The way that I see it, though is that we made "good enemies" or "good foes", because, despite all of the saber-rattling and propaganda, we were both intelligent, civilized peoples, and I think that deep down, despite all of the extensive preparations for "The Battle to End All Life on the Planet"... we both knew this in our hearts. I think that my greatest uneasiness during that time was the potential for a false trigger due to malfunction, accident, or the actions of a rogue commander. (I always liked the Russian saying: "If there is a person, there is a problem. If there is no person, then there is no problem." ha, great wry humor! True in the case of the Rogue Commander, not so much, in the case of equipment failure, though, ha)

 

The same cannot be said about the current "war" ("the global threat of terrorism"), or more aptly put, "Errorism". It leaves too much to randomness & uncertainty... this is pretty much the core of what makes it an excellent & perfect propaganda tool, to control societies, though, so it's fairly obvious why it is so in vogue... it makes up for the absence of "a real, tangible opponent", ha.

 

I kind of had an amusing flash of insight a few months ago... Here in America, in the 1980s, California-based media-presented culture was all flashy florescent colors, BMX freestyle bicycles, valley girls, & Pac-Man... or at least that is the way that a lot of people view the 80s that I grew up in, from afar, in 2011. You end up with a lot of "80s Dance Nites" at nite-clubs, and such... a lot of it is revisionist hogwash, but that's the story that the people want to believe.

 

The thing that struck me as ironic is that it is a circus-like atmosphere of revelry, about a time that younger people didn't even live through, yet celebrate like it was fact, while at the same time, nobody stops to think how much it would have sucked to have to go into the trudging waste of time and lives during the drawn out War in Afghanistan, for teenagers & young adults who grew up in Russia during the 80s. So, no, it would not have been very much of a good time 80s nite in Russia, and I thought, ha, I bet there are no "80s Nite" niteclubs in Russia...

 

ha... I'm sure that Yakov Smirnoff could work that into some kind of comedy routine, lol. I remember he had a funny one, years ago, that went something like: "When I came to America, I needed to get some furniture for the place I was staying, and the sign at the store said, "We stand behind every piece of furniture that we sell."... & he was like Whhhhaaaaa? I left Mother Russia to avoid things like this...". lol.

 

Well, thanks for the pronunciation tip, I'll be looking into making some of that good food!

 

All the Best!

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Hi there, Friends!

 

Do you like this cyrillic congratulation with New Year and Christmas?

I'll repeat it in English of course...

 

> Long Live the Glorious Community of Nobless Atarians!

> My warmest wishes from Moscow!

> Happy New Year and Merry Christmas!

> Evgeni Zolotariov

 

With this post I send you a little demo of russifying of our beloved Atari.

It has full Cyrillic typewriter layout (not KOI-8r) and russian loadable font.

Demo was called fld.com - FontLoaDer. Layouts changed by SELECT console key.

It was written in CC8 and MAC65.

 

All the Best!

post-20208-0-28156100-1323535203_thumb.png

post-20208-0-58079100-1323535217_thumb.jpg

CC8Dos33.atr

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It seems that more information was recently made available about the "Buran program", which I had heard of, and was familiar with, but didn't know too much about it's operational details. I was under the impression that it had essentially been a mock-up & prototype that was never actually flown... so I was very surprised to read that it had flown once, but more impressively, that it had no pilots, and flew by computer control.

 

As it turns out, the language known as DRAKON was developed by the Soviet AI community, to streamline the process of software & systems development. It also appears that the language was also used to optimize the development of the aerospace vehicle, itself. Fascinating stuff. The manual for DRAKON shows it as a Visual Language that utilizes the familiar "Flowchart Metaphor", which is very cool. Upon reflection, it seems obvious that there should have been a language like this, very early on, since we all learn flowcharting, in school.

 

 

Ha,

 

I know the Buran and have seen it a few weeks ago here in Germany ! It had been bought by the german Technikmuseum Speyer (just like the Concorde and many other huge objects) and can be inspected there. Here is the webpage of the museum:

http://www.technik-museum.de/

There are several films, documentations, pictures and lots of other stuff about the russian space technology available in Speyer. So, if you want to see the Buran - welcome to Germany !

 

-Andreas Koch.

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Hi, Andreas.

 

It's very important that someone want to save historical artefacts when others making money trying to sell all their own country.

They are as mistletoes balls on willow tree...

 

Thank you for Speyer's link. I never knew before that Buran is so huge.

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Hello friends.

 

I tried yesterday to write simple function for reading DIR with any mask needed and without any success.

You know that internal LISP (DIR NUM) can't accept file mask and really used in another program.

 

As I remember for reading DIR we must write something like this

  (OPEN 4 6 'D1:*.*)
LOOP
  (IN# 4)
  (SETQ LIS (READ))
  (PR# 0)
  (PRINT LIS)
(GO LOOP)

This code reads nothing.

Any help appreciated!

 

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130XE,

 

I am not a coder in LISP, but from my brief time using LOGO, I might venture that there is a missing single quote following the file descriptor. If I am not off base, the first line from the code above should be (OPEN 4 6 'D1:*.*').

 

Hopefully, someone who is more familiar with LISP will chime in soon. Good luck!

Edited by Kylev

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Thank you Kylev.

 

Really single quote sign in (OPEN 4 6 'D1:*.*) is a shortcut for this symbolic LISP expression (QUOTE D1:*.*)

It's needed as LISP represents data and statements in the same manner but statements must be evaluated while data must stay intact.

Here the example of working s-exp (LOAD 'D1:EDIT.LSP) It loads programm EDIT.LSP perfectly.

 

Simply I don't know algorithm of getting DIR from disk and thus I'm lost.

 

I can't find a way to terminate cycle of reading DIR data.

 

By the way LISP and LOGO is almost the same.

Do you have working LOGO DIR programm?

 

Best wishes from Moscow.

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Really I think that the Atari way of getting DIR is dirty inconsistent program.

 

It has not logical end.

And it was developed only for assembler. It's very declarative.

 

In BASIC we have ERROR and TRAP and then loops to another environment.

 

Do we need new version of Atari BIOS?

2 times of EOF may be real EOF but one EOF is defined end of directory without FREE SECTORS COUNT.

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This version is slightly more responsive.

It asks user to enter mask and then reads directory.

But output is terrible. (POKE 128 0) hides LISP prompt.

(LAMBDA NIL
  (PROG (INP D)
        (POKE 128 0)
        (PRIN1 (QUOTE "Enter filemask, please..."))
        (TERPRI)
        (SETQ INP (READ))
        (OPEN 4 6 INP)
        (IN# 4)
        LOOP
        (SETQ D (READ))
        (PRIN1 D)
        (TERPRI)
        (GO LOOP)))
Edited by 130XE

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Now I can get real output

 

It's vertical columns of ATOMS.

 

It Ends with SECTORS...

 

Bad luck.

 

Strange thing... Now I can understand what is if they say that LISP - is not a language but selfconstructing environment.

 

I see some things.

 

- one say that input stream obtains by LISP as a lot of ATOMS.

- two - is that I must check about the type of Atom. It may be number or charachter. etc...

 

I'll try investigate it further...

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Hello friends.

 

I'm trying to learn InterLISP/65 and recently decided to define SETQQ function

which does not evaluate it's both arguments but bounded second argument to first one.

It is used in Interlisp very frequently.

 

In Interlisp/65 syntax it may be called like this:

LISP
(SETQQ SUM (+ A B))

LISP
(+ A B)

LISP
SUM

LISP
(+ A B)

I read that in INTERLISP it defines as NLAMBDA...

 

And I found SETQQ definition as MACRO in Common LISP.

_(defmacro setqq (х у)
(list 'setq х (list (quote у)))
SETQQ

_(setqq fn (a b с)) ; 
(ABC)

_fn
(А В С)

Being macroexpanded this definitions transformes to call:

(SETQ FN (QUOTE (А В С)))

And being evaluated bounds (A B C) to FN

 

I tried to write macro like this but absolutely unsuccessful.

Many times later I read in InterLISP/65 manual that type MACRO can have only ONE argument.

The same concerns NLAMBDA.

 

What is this single argument in MACRO is enigma, because InterLISP/65 lacks of MACROEXPAND facility.

 

But reading THE BIBLE I found that it's possible to find this secret argument in NLAMBDA case.

 

Look at this:

LISP
(DEFINEQ MYARGS
?
(NLAMBDA (A)
?
A))

LISP
(NLAMBDA (A) A)

LISP
(MYARGS 1 2 A B)

LISP
(1 2 A B)

as NLAMBDA not evaluate it's single argument thus this argument is the list of arguments while calling!

 

When I understand it I wrote SETQQ.

LISP
(DEFINEQ SETQQ
?
(NLAMBDA (ARG)
?
(SET (CAR ARG) (CADR ARG))))

LISP
(NLAMBDA (ARG) (SET (CAR ARG) (CADR ARG))))

LISP
(SETQQ MUL (* A B))

LISP
(* A B)

LISP
MUL

LISP
(* A B)

That's all, folks.

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